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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have to remove my front wheel to change the rotor and pads on my 2007 Scrambler, and noticed a 'bolt' going through the RHS fork leg under the axle.

It doesn't look threaded but I guess is part of the removal process of the front wheel.

Can anyone enlighten me and also suggest a good workshop manual for my bike.

cheers

Peter
 

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Can anyone enlighten me and also suggest a good workshop manual for my bike.
Peter, you'd be best getting down to Halfords to see if they have the Haynes manual for the Bonnie.

The "bolt" I think you're referring to is the clamp bolt for the front spindle.

Shown here...


Its important that this is retorqued to the correct value when its put back together,
as are the caliper bolts which you'll also be removing.

You'll need the manual (and a torque wrench!) to get the correct values for these.

V.
 

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You will probably want the Hayne's manual. It deals with all such issues. Also there is a Triumph manual, but it assumed a fair bit of knowledge.
 

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Peter, stop...

....put down the hammer, put your hands in the air and step away from the motorcycle sir :D

Peter,

Don't take this the wrong way, but if you don't know what the pinch bolt is for, are you sure you want to be replacing the rotor and pads?

As well as the other things mentioned, you'll find things a bit easier if you also have a stand for the front end. Also while you're down at Halfords, get an impact driver for the disc bolts. They have shallow heads and are loctited in, sometimes they're tight enough to round off with an ordinary allen key alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No offence taken, just most of my work has been restoring Japanese classics, and they are a bit more straightforward. It wasn't immediately obvious how to remove it. The bike is on a scissorjack stand with the front wheel off the ground, and I have blue loctite and a torque wrench to hand. I find it is always easier to ask if unsure, even if something appears obvious, when working on a new bike for the first time. I am never embarrassed to ask what might seem blindingly obvious to others ;-)

I will get the Haynes manual asap

cheers

Peter
 

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No offence taken, just most of my work has been restoring Japanese classics, and they are a bit more straightforward. It wasn't immediately obvious how to remove it. The bike is on a scissorjack stand with the front wheel off the ground, and I have blue loctite and a torque wrench to hand. I find it is always easier to ask if unsure, even if something appears obvious, when working on a new bike for the first time. I am never embarrassed to ask what might seem blindingly obvious to others ;-)

I will get the Haynes manual asap

cheers

Peter
What's the rule... Oh yeah, there are no stupid questions. Can't really fault you for asking. A seemingly dumb question now may save a ton of frustration and cash later. I see a Haynes manual in your future :)
 

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When refitting your wheel, Tighten the axle to the correct torque, push up n down on the forks to centralise the fork tubes in the sliders, THEN tighten the pinch bolt on the fork.
This is a step often over looked by many, and is the most common reason for stiff/binding tubes, and premature bush wear in front forks.
Hope this helps.
 
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