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I know this topic has already been addressed on this forum, but I am too lazy to slog though all the threads, so I am asking owners for some assistance.

I am seriously looking at a new Scrambler, as my first brand new bike in almost 30 years. How do you like it? Any undue problems?
how have you been treated by the dealer/factory? Are warranty problems handled promptly? Any problems not covered by warranty?

How is it on the highway? I'm not looking for a touring bike, but I don't want to rattle my teeth cruising at freeway speed, like my old Bonneville does.

How about dirt roads? I know it's not a dirt bike, but there are lots of old mining roads around here I like to ride. My Sportster handles them fine.My Commando, not so much.

Any feedback you can supply would be greatly appreciated. :bow:
 

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Hi Commando guy, I'm much like you, I've recently bought a Scrambler, my previous bike was a 1964 T100SS, so my big worries were changing gear with the left foot and braking with the right, also the Scrambler weighs ~200 kg and has a fairly high seat height and I weigh 60kgs soaking wet. Anyway I trailered it from the dealer and had my first nervous ride out from home, early in the morning. Absolutely fabulous, lovely big powerful bike, easy to ride, NO vibration, lots of modern gizmos like electric starter and indicators and stuff. Am really pleased with mine but would not do any serious off roading 'cos I know if I dropped the bike I would never be able to pick it up again. Only disappointment has been the silencers (mufflers), far too quiet, but that's an easy fix. Get down to your dealer and buy one now!







--k
 

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This is my 40th bike, I sold my 996 Ducati and bought a Scrambler, Have had everything from Harleys to GSXR's Ducks Triumphs Hondas and even 2 Custom built mega buck choppers......Buy the Scrambler. I have more people comment or talk with me about this bike than any other, People of all ages stare at it in Traffic, It is a total blast, I actually think this will be a keeper, Its not fast but fast enough, its wayyyyyyyyyyyy to quiet soon to be fixed, Handles great good gas and the smiles per mile are unreal, I got mine for 8500 OTD and I think you can get them now for 8200 otd in California, Buy one you will ot be Sorry :-D
 

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the reasons I didn't buy a scrambler:

1. 270 firing...a guy let me ride his, and at low speed you get the "ta-Dung ta-Dung ta-Dung" lope. I understand it gives a torque wallop, but a vertical twin is not a V twin. By doing that 270 thing it loses some of it's nature.
2. tho I like high pipes (should be on the left) the right carb is inaccessable and oil fill is awkward.
3. high pipes make luggage a slim possibility.

I like the Scrambler.
if I had a collection, it would be there.
taste-wise, I wanted a Tiger...then a Scrambler
then bought a Bonneville.

I like the 360 better, and because my knees are shot, I'm currently making a forward pegs set-up (passive). The Bonneville platform just lends itself to more variation.

dirt-wise, your oil filter sticks down just as far as mine...so other than the 270, we're looking at cosmetics. with a skid plate and tires, I can still do everything you want from the Scrambler...only civilized... the torque may come on a bit higher...rationally my projected miles are 95/5 road/dirt.

If I wanted more dirt, it would be a KLR or similar with some suspension travel...so on the edge, we're looking at escaping police by running up/down some city steps, and the Scrambler may be more provocative.

the only reason to choose a Scrambler over a Bonneville is passion/emotion....cause logic swings the other way.
 

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Commandoroadster,

Given your taste in motorcycles, you'll be very happy with the Scrambler! I sure have enjoyed mine for 3,500 miles since July 4! I ride it on the extemely crooked roads of the Smokey mtns. near my home, and all the National Forest roads are a blast.

On the highway, it will cruise at 80 mph all day, and I've felt no buzzing or irritating vibration at all.

Warranty issues? What warranty issues? I haven't even had to adjust the chain yet!

It needs those Thunderbike mufflers.

Now I have a question for you...I have a 1965 T100SC, but it has low pipes. Where can I get high pipes for it?

Regards,
 

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I purchased my 06 Scrambler in September, so far it's been excellent with no problems. It's a great bike that's a blast to ride. Like others have said, it handles the curves with plenty of power to be fun.

My only issue with the bike is the exhaust, it's way to quiet. Don't get me wrong, I'm not looking to rattle windows but the stock exhaust is so quiet you can hardly tells it's running.
 

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I have had my Scrambler since May. I have owned 8 other Triumphs and this is one of my favorites. I am 6'1 and it sits higher than the standard Bonnie - which I need. I like the motor - more power/torque than I expected. I added the TOR's and rejetted - love the sound. Make this change as quickly as possible.

I have no problems on the highway, although I have not done a lot of miles on the slab. Same for off-road. I will not take this off-road - unless necessary. I consider it to be strictly a street bike.

I am in the middle of a number of mods to the bike. New rear shocks, Race-Tech front (emulators/springs), new tires (Pirelli Sport Demons), new bars, new front/rear lights, new seat, Dart flyscreen. I want to turn it into a street bike only - that is why I went with more aggresive street tires and lower bars.

I would definately recommend the bike. Fun, good looking and easy to work on. I can't wait to get mine back together and back on the road.
 

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The Scrambler is a great all around bike. the TOR's sound actually pretty loud, with a booming crack to them when you fire it up. The bike bone stock has plenty of low end grunt, and enough power for cruising st up to 90 mph, and has a very nice, unique retro look. It definately sits up a little higher than the rest of the Bonnie lineup, and has slightly different steering geometry, making it a little more maneuverable at lower speeds and a little twitchier at higher speeds.

Like all the rest of the Bonnies you can massage the motor if that's your prefence and squeeze out another 10 to 40% more horsepower depending on if you want to just do stuff like airbox removal and aftermarket mufflers/TOR's or if you want to go full nine yards reworked cylinder head, cams, and carbs as well. I left mine alone mechanically, other than the TOR's, re-jet and AI removal (this greatly reduces the pipe's bluing, mine just turned slighly gold where the header exits the head) because I drive her pretty mellow and don't want to spend a fortune on mechanical upgrades, and most of these more sophisticated engine mods seem to yield the majority of their benefits at engine rpms in excess of 5k, which I don't see too often. Also, a lot of people change the springs and shocks for a more supple ride.

The Scrambler engine shares the same block, pistons, bore and stroke as the rest of the Bonnie lineup but it has a 270 degree firng rather than 360 degree, so it produces about 10 less peak horespower and slightly more torque at a lower rpm range. It also gives the engine a more rumbling exhaust note with less of a staccato bark to it than the 360 degree motor. Some people say that it also gives the bike better traction for an off road environment, and definately the higher torque at lower rpm's, lower peak horsepower, makes it better as an around town bike, and less of a highway bike.

Just like with the higher performance mods, the Scrambler offers the same kind of blank canvas styling opportunities that the rest of the Bonnie lineup does, and a lot of people give it the "off-road" look treatment with bash plate, single seat/rack, headlight stone guard, etc. I went pretty nuts with styling mods on mine, giving it a "City Scrambler" look with chrome engine, backrest, flyscreen, Lucas lights, etc.

I think this time of year, you could probably get a pretty good price on an '06. The only difference between '06 and '07 is there is a new color combo available of silver and green 2 tone, and the engine covers are now black rather than clear lacquer.
 

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I've had my scrambler since July and love it. No vibration on the highway and it does okay on fireroads. The torque curve is absolutely flat so the bike is a plkeasure to ride under any conditions. My buddies who ride Harleys feel a little left out as no one gives their bikes a second look but there is always a lot of interest in the scrambler. The scrambler has no problem keeping up with the Harleys on a long road trip.

As others have said the bike is way too quiet. Instead fo forking out $450 for the Triumph TOR's I drilled the baffles out of my stock mufflers. The stock suspension is okay at slow speed and around town but on the freeway it is way to stiff. I put Progressive Suspension springs in the front and Ikon 7614's on the rear. That made a huge difference. The only other thing I will change soon are the tires. The stock Bridgestones anr fine on the dirt but on the pavement they howl and vibrate. I will likely replace them with tires that are a little more street friendly like the Michelin Anakees.

All in all I would say buy one. You won't be disappointed and the it is a great value.
 

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This is my fourth Triumph and eighth bike overall (dirt and street) and I have to say it is by far my favorite! I actually like the feel of the 270 degree engine and I actually like the pipes.

It does handle dirt and gravel roads well and it will go on roads that I wouldn't have taken my Bonnie on (I traded in my KLR and Bonnie on the Scrambler).

Get one, it puts a smile on my face everytime I ride it.
 

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A fly screen is nice at highway speeds, and a bash plate is a good idea if you're going to ride the mining roads. Otherwise the bike is perfect.
 
J

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Hey there,

I'd highly recommend scrambler ownership! Coming from serial norton commando ownership, I was reluctant to own a bike with an electric starter, unit construction motor and all of those modern conveniences that make new brit bikes a bit better than 30 year old brit bikes. I thought I'd end up wimping out like the rest of the world has seemed to and start thinking convenience is better than soul.
Well, I bought the scrambler and I love it! It doesn't sound like my old bike because the motor's different, but when I ride my commando I end up wondering where the whining sound is and when I ride the triumph, I wonder why I can't hear the valve train tapping away. It has been a pain in the butt remembering that the triumph's shift pattern is the reverse of my commando's though, it makes for fun down***** action!!!.
When on a small two lane road going way too fast my scrambler reminds me of a t100c that I used to have . It feels lighter than it is and has great power. I rode it from Virginia to Maine in September, in pounding rain about half of the time up and back, and the only thing that happened is the the gas cap vapor-locked and the motor stalled twice. So I just left the cap loose and continued on my way. I think it was my tank bag making wet seal around the gas cap because it has not happened again and I've had the cap tight for a while now. As far as power goes, I could pass just about anything I wanted to on the interstate and frequently did. The bike felt rock solid the whole way.
I have had a warranty issue, the oil galley plugs up behind the starter were leaking oil at about 600 miles and this was fixed under warranty at the dealer without any undue BS. They wrapped the plugs with teflon tape and re-inserted them as per the factory's advice.
The scrambler is better on dirt/gravel roads than my norton is. I went up a mountain on a gravel road that was well rutted and eroded and it was alright... until the gravel got 6-8 inches deep and then it's weight became apparent, but it did it. I especially like the pinging sound when rocks hit the skid plate!!
Overall I just can't say enough positive stuff about this bike, chicks dig it, kids dig it, grouchy old HD guys dig it and most importantly, it puts a smile on MY face.. and that's the most important thing.
jimmy
 

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Buying a Scrambler is like taking a bath in the fountain of youth. You will become younger,your hair will return to it original color,you will loose 45lbs and be full of piss and vinegar!!.....If however you want the opposite effects,buy a Harley Davidson! :-D
 

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I live in the Hi Desert of California, it plows a bit in sand but Fireroads and minor trails are a non issue, I have a full blown MX bike and no its not near the same but the fact is you CAN off road it and hit the fwy etc....love this thing :razz:
 

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I agree with 99% of what everyone else said here. I love my Scrambler, and 100% recommend this bike. Just make sure you know what it is about, and what it cannot do. As I add most of the Scrambler accessories to my bike, it takes on a character that becomes even more distinct from the Bonneville (which I also have). The Bonneville is probably a better and smoother ride as a cruiser type bike. But the Scrambler has its own style that is equally unique. You will be amazed at the comments you will receive about the Scrambler or any of the current retro Triumphs.
 

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I spent my whole life riding dirt bikes, so the Scrambler was a perfect choice for me........it 's comfy, looks great, fun to ride on dirt roads or the highway.

As others have said, it gets a lot of attention at the gas station or stoplight. Not why I bought it but a nice fringe benefit!

Buy it and you won't be sorry.
 
K

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I've been considering a Scrambler too. I wondered about heat from those pipes. I've heard conflicting reports on this. One dealer I spoke with recommended wrapping the pipes due to heat. Another told me the heat shield got hotter from the sun shinning on it than it does from the heat of the pipes.
 

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k9bite,

I've done nearly 10,000 miles since March, the only time I cursed the heat of the pipes was getting burnt on them whilst trying to change the oil (should've had another cup of coffee to let them cool down a bit) and when my flappy nylon oversuit got holes burned through the leg where it got blown onto the pipes in bad weather. Apart from that they're pretty well shielded as stock.

[ This message was edited by: johnyC on 2006-12-13 04:56 ]
 

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I agree with johnyc Triumph did a good job with the heat shields and even though you know the heat is there I haven't had any problems.

I have heard from others on ratnet that removing the air injection will lower the temperature of the pipes.
 

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Removing the air injection did make a difference in respect to the temp. However, the heat shields work great as they come from the factory, no modifications required.
 
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