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Just bought a Scrambler 1200 XC with Escape Kit. I test rode a 2017 BMW F800 GS, a Honda Africa Twin, an FTR 1200, a Scrambler 1200 XE, and sat on a Ducati Desert Sled (Dealer could not allow test ride). The Scrambler 1200 is the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden, right out of the box. A big part is the bench seat. I can move back (and around) where I am comfortable without being pigeon holed into a spot (like the virtual saddle of the multistrada) which inevitably pushes me toward the tank.

I am still second guessing if I should have gone for the XE. I am 6'6". These are big bikes (not quite Africa Twin Big), and I felt even more comfortable on the XE, which is a bit larger bike and even has adjustable handlebar height. However, I didn't have the best experience on the XE as it seemed to wander a tiny bit here and there on the test ride. Sort of unnerving, like going over a bridge grate, but I was on asphalt . After the ride I even checked to see the bikes had the same tires (they did have Metzeler Tourance). The dealer thought the tire pressure may have been an issue, because he thought I was only coming for the XC and did not pre-check the pressure in the XE.

I do "0" off road riding, save a gravel/dirt road I may run into by accident out here in Iowa. It is simply the bench seat and bike height that drove me to the scrambler market. So, between the factory installed Escape Kit on the XC, along with the fact that it is designed for more on road the the XE, I got the XC and just ordered Rox Risers for the handlebars.

Looking for any words of wisdom, tips, or any chatter in regard to the Scrambler 1200. I am happy to try to answer any questions or give my opinions if anyone is curious. I do not see a place to add a pic of the bike, so I'll look into that later.
 

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Just bought a Scrambler 1200 XC with Escape Kit. I test rode a 2017 BMW F800 GS, a Honda Africa Twin, an FTR 1200, a Scrambler 1200 XE, and sat on a Ducati Desert Sled (Dealer could not allow test ride). The Scrambler 1200 is the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden, right out of the box. A big part is the bench seat. I can move back (and around) where I am comfortable without being pigeon holed into a spot (like the virtual saddle of the multistrada) which inevitably pushes me toward the tank.

I am still second guessing if I should have gone for the XE. I am 6'6". These are big bikes (not quite Africa Twin Big), and I felt even more comfortable on the XE, which is a bit larger bike and even has adjustable handlebar height. However, I didn't have the best experience on the XE as it seemed to wander a tiny bit here and there on the test ride. Sort of unnerving, like going over a bridge grate, but I was on asphalt . After the ride I even checked to see the bikes had the same tires (they did have Metzeler Tourance). The dealer thought the tire pressure may have been an issue, because he thought I was only coming for the XC and did not pre-check the pressure in the XE.

I do "0" off road riding, save a gravel/dirt road I may run into by accident out here in Iowa. It is simply the bench seat and bike height that drove me to the scrambler market. So, between the factory installed Escape Kit on the XC, along with the fact that it is designed for more on road the the XE, I got the XC and just ordered Rox Risers for the handlebars.

Looking for any words of wisdom, tips, or any chatter in regard to the Scrambler 1200. I am happy to try to answer any questions or give my opinions if anyone is curious. I do not see a place to add a pic of the bike, so I'll look into that later.
Hi Dr Joe,
At last I've found someone who has experienced the unnerving handling of the 1200xe. I picked up my new 1200xe (unlike you I should have test ridden it) only to find within the first three miles that it wandered like it was out of alignment. I reported this to my dealer and they said it was fine. I was not satisfied with this, so I checked the wheel alignment, and found the front wheelwas 26mm out of alignment with the rear. I contacted triumph directly, and they told me that is was designed to follow the same Centreline. I have continued to try and resolve this, but now they are saying that it was designed this. I am still trying to get them to respond to my emails and phone calls, but I think I'm being threated, like the proverbial, fly in the ointment.
Hopefully I will find outer people that have experienced the handling issue, in order to bring it further to their attention.
Regards Gerry 59.
Just bought a Scrambler 1200 XC with Escape Kit. I test rode a 2017 BMW F800 GS, a Honda Africa Twin, an FTR 1200, a Scrambler 1200 XE, and sat on a Ducati Desert Sled (Dealer could not allow test ride). The Scrambler 1200 is the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden, right out of the box. A big part is the bench seat. I can move back (and around) where I am comfortable without being pigeon holed into a spot (like the virtual saddle of the multistrada) which inevitably pushes me toward the tank.

I am still second guessing if I should have gone for the XE. I am 6'6". These are big bikes (not quite Africa Twin Big), and I felt even more comfortable on the XE, which is a bit larger bike and even has adjustable handlebar height. However, I didn't have the best experience on the XE as it seemed to wander a tiny bit here and there on the test ride. Sort of unnerving, like going over a bridge grate, but I was on asphalt . After the ride I even checked to see the bikes had the same tires (they did have Metzeler Tourance). The dealer thought the tire pressure may have been an issue, because he thought I was only coming for the XC and did not pre-check the pressure in the XE.

I do "0" off road riding, save a gravel/dirt road I may run into by accident out here in Iowa. It is simply the bench seat and bike height that drove me to the scrambler market. So, between the factory installed Escape Kit on the XC, along with the fact that it is designed for more on road the the XE, I got the XC and just ordered Rox Risers for the handlebars.

Looking for any words of wisdom, tips, or any chatter in regard to the Scrambler 1200. I am happy to try to answer any questions or give my opinions if anyone is curious. I do not see a place to add a pic of the bike, so I'll look into that later.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi Dr Joe,
At last I've found someone who has experienced the unnerving handling of the 1200xe. I picked up my new 1200xe (unlike you I should have test ridden it) only to find within the first three miles that it wandered like it was out of alignment. I reported this to my dealer and they said it was fine. I was not satisfied with this, so I checked the wheel alignment, and found the front wheelwas 26mm out of alignment with the rear. I contacted triumph directly, and they told me that is was designed to follow the same Centreline. I have continued to try and resolve this, but now they are saying that it was designed this. I am still trying to get them to respond to my emails and phone calls, but I think I'm being threated, like the proverbial, fly in the ointment.
Hopefully I will find outer people that have experienced the handling issue, in order to bring it further to their attention.
Regards Gerry 59.
How interesting! In fact, I now own both an XC and an XE. I have two residences, I loved the XC so much but always 2nd guessed my choice of the XC over the XE. I went and test rode another 2019 XE, and it did not have the wandering feeling at all. So I bought it and now have about 800 miles on it and pushing 3,000 miles on the XC. I plan to take the XE to my FL residence. I have no issue with that unnerving wander on this new XE, and I have ridden it well above the posted speed limit on rare occasion.

BTW, How did you measure the wheel alignment? I have seen a simple method with a string, but anything else? Alignment would definitely explain the handling issue I thought that I felt, but so might suspension adjustment. Can you share your documented communications with Triumph? I assume alignment repair would be under warranty. My dealer (Baxter) tells me that Triumph (the company) is great at customer support and making things right, so maybe start with your dealer. I also doubt that this issue is inherent in all XE's based on my own experience (owning a "good" XE) and the lack of comment from all of the reviewers of the bike.

Now, I have heard that there is a suspension issue regarding under-sprug rear pre-load and generally stiff XE suspension. I have seen a YouTube video of a Ohlins employee noticing that the factory-set adjustments of the stock suspension on an XE was terrible. Some adjustments fully opened and some fully closed. He also could not set the proper Sag for a heavy guy (but I noticed he was incorrectly using the specs of the XC).

I do not know your weight, but I am 6'6" and 275 and I do not know what the Sag is on my bike. Have you adjusted your suspension? Maybe it is not the alignment but the suspension settings. It is hard to adjust the preload on the XE d/t the position of the knob, even with the seat off. So I have not adjusted that yet but I plan to stiffen it up for full support as I assume Sag would be more than 1/3 with me on the seat. But I did set both front and rear compression and rebound (so easy) to just a clink less that fully open (soft). They were set factory set evenly side-to-side, but set on the firm side. I don't go off road or plan to do any jumps, and this bike has a mile of travel and is a firm ride anyway. I think the bike, for me, is much more comfortable and generally better to ride this way. I do not really push in the corners, but I love the handling with these settings. If you have not checked and adjusted the suspension try doing that and let me (us) know how things pan out.
 

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How interesting! In fact, I now own both an XC and an XE. I have two residences, I loved the XC so much but always 2nd guessed my choice of the XC over the XE. I went and test rode another 2019 XE, and it did not have the wandering feeling at all. So I bought it and now have about 800 miles on it and pushing 3,000 miles on the XC. I plan to take the XE to my FL residence. I have no issue with that unnerving wander on this new XE, and I have ridden it well above the posted speed limit on rare occasion.

BTW, How did you measure the wheel alignment? I have seen a simple method with a string, but anything else? Alignment would definitely explain the handling issue I thought that I felt, but so might suspension adjustment. Can you share your documented communications with Triumph? I assume alignment repair would be under warranty. My dealer (Baxter) tells me that Triumph (the company) is great at customer support and making things right, so maybe start with your dealer. I also doubt that this issue is inherent in all XE's based on my own experience (owning a "good" XE) and the lack of comment from all of the reviewers of the bike.

Now, I have heard that there is a suspension issue regarding under-sprug rear pre-load and generally stiff XE suspension. I have seen a YouTube video of a Ohlins employee noticing that the factory-set adjustments of the stock suspension on an XE was terrible. Some adjustments fully opened and some fully closed. He also could not set the proper Sag for a heavy guy (but I noticed he was incorrectly using the specs of the XC).

I do not know your weight, but I am 6'6" and 275 and I do not know what the Sag is on my bike. Have you adjusted your suspension? Maybe it is not the alignment but the suspension settings. It is hard to adjust the preload on the XE d/t the position of the knob, even with the seat off. So I have not adjusted that yet but I plan to stiffen it up for full support as I assume Sag would be more than 1/3 with me on the seat. But I did set both front and rear compression and rebound (so easy) to just a clink less that fully open (soft). They were set factory set evenly side-to-side, but set on the firm side. I don't go off road or plan to do any jumps, and this bike has a mile of travel and is a firm ride anyway. I think the bike, for me, is much more comfortable and generally better to ride this way. I do not really push in the corners, but I love the handling with these settings. If you have not checked and adjusted the suspension try doing that and let me (us) know how things pan out.
Did you adjust preload on the forks yet? I'm trying to determine which way to turn the gold nut to increase preload, oddly turning it all the way in either direction doesn't really effect sag that much on my XE.
 

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Did you adjust preload on the forks yet? I'm trying to determine which way to turn the gold nut to increase preload, oddly turning it all the way in either direction doesn't really effect sag that much on my XE.
The right hand fork adjusts the compression, and the left hand fork does the rebound. The preload is adjustable via the rear shocks, via the large adjuster ring at the top on both shocks. Hope this helps.
Regards Gerry.
 

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The right hand fork adjusts the compression, and the left hand fork does the rebound. The preload is adjustable via the rear shocks, via the large adjuster ring at the top on both shocks. Hope this helps.
Regards Gerry.
The black screw on top of the fork adjusts rebound and dampening on either side, but the gold nut on top of the fork is pre-load, I just can't find any literature or instructions on which way to turn it.
 

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Did you adjust preload on the forks yet? I'm trying to determine which way to turn the gold nut to increase preload, oddly turning it all the way in either direction doesn't really effect sag that much on my XE.
Did you adjust preload on the forks yet? I'm trying to determine which way to turn the gold nut to increase preload, oddly turning it all the way in either direction doesn't really effect sag that much on my XE.
How interesting! In fact, I now own both an XC and an XE. I have two residences, I loved the XC so much but always 2nd guessed my choice of the XC over the XE. I went and test rode another 2019 XE, and it did not have the wandering feeling at all. So I bought it and now have about 800 miles on it and pushing 3,000 miles on the XC. I plan to take the XE to my FL residence. I have no issue with that unnerving wander on this new XE, and I have ridden it well above the posted speed limit on rare occasion.

BTW, How did you measure the wheel alignment? I have seen a simple method with a string, but anything else? Alignment would definitely explain the handling issue I thought that I felt, but so might suspension adjustment. Can you share your documented communications with Triumph? I assume alignment repair would be under warranty. My dealer (Baxter) tells me that Triumph (the company) is great at customer support and making things right, so maybe start with your dealer. I also doubt that this issue is inherent in all XE's based on my own experience (owning a "good" XE) and the lack of comment from all of the reviewers of the bike.

Now, I have heard that there is a suspension issue regarding under-sprug rear pre-load and generally stiff XE suspension. I have seen a YouTube video of a Ohlins employee noticing that the factory-set adjustments of the stock suspension on an XE was terrible. Some adjustments fully opened and some fully closed. He also could not set the proper Sag for a heavy guy (but I noticed he was incorrectly using the specs of the XC).

I do not know your weight, but I am 6'6" and 275 and I do not know what the Sag is on my bike. Have you adjusted your suspension? Maybe it is not the alignment but the suspension settings. It is hard to adjust the preload on the XE d/t the position of the knob, even with the seat off. So I have not adjusted that yet but I plan to stiffen it up for full support as I assume Sag would be more than 1/3 with me on the seat. But I did set both front and rear compression and rebound (so easy) to just a clink less that fully open (soft). They were set factory set evenly side-to-side, but set on the firm side. I don't go off road or plan to do any jumps, and this bike has a mile of travel and is a firm ride anyway. I think the bike, for me, is much more comfortable and generally better to ride this way. I do not really push in the corners, but I love the handling with these settings. If you have not checked and adjusted the suspension try doing that and let me (us) know how things pan out.
I measured the alignment by using two aluminium straightedges perfectly placed against the rear wheel, as high as you can get away with, and touching the front and rear of the rear wheel. Once they are positioned correctly, check to see if the front wheel is sitting parallel with the straightedge. Adjust steering to achieve this, but make sure they remain against the rear. When you are satisfied that everything is set, check the gap at the front wheel either side. It should be the same.
Triumph are reviewing mine at the moment to see what the problem is. My first contact with them, they said that both wheels should follow the same Centreline. If this is right there is a big problem with mine, but now I'm beginning to think that they have built an offset into the frame design. Hopefully I will find out soon.
Regards Gerry.
 

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The black screw on top of the fork adjusts rebound and dampening on either side, but the gold nut on top of the fork is pre-load, I just can't find any literature or instructions on which way to turn it.
The adjustment details are on page 141 of my handbook. If you haven't got a handbook, there is one that keeps popping up on Google.
 

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The adjustment details are on page 141 of my handbook. If you haven't got a handbook, there is one that keeps popping up on Google.
This is weird. Am I the only one whose manual does NOT have “FORK”preload adjustment instructions.

I’m not sure you are getting what I’m saying... I’m not trying to adjust the preload on the rear shocks or dampening or rebound anywhere. There are NO instructions in the manual, google searches, YouTube videos... anything on how to adjust preload on the Showa forks on an XE. I can’t even find a product manual on the Showa website. Weird.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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This is weird. Am I the only one whose manual does NOT have “FORK”preload adjustment instructions.

I’m not sure you are getting what I’m saying... I’m not trying to adjust the preload on the rear shocks or dampening or rebound anywhere. There are NO instructions in the manual, google searches, YouTube videos... anything on how to adjust preload on the Showa forks on an XE. I can’t even find a product manual on the Showa website. Weird.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I don't think there will be preload adjustment on the front, unless it's done by using spacers. I haven't tried front preload adjustment only rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Did you adjust preload on the forks yet? I'm trying to determine which way to turn the gold nut to increase preload, oddly turning it all the way in either direction doesn't really effect sag that much on my XE.
Yes. I did adjust all suspension settings on both my XC and XE, but ultimately I only completed measuring Sag on the rear on my XC, and I was at almost exactly 50%. I had no help so I just assumed that the XE and XC were similar enough and that the front forks, like the rear, would not be able to have enough pre-load to accommodate my weight (275). So I just went with max pre-load on both front and rear.

Based on online videos, I gathered that the front fork pre-load gold nut is measured as fully clockwise is least pre-load (shorter bike) and fully counter-clockwise results in more pre-load (taller bike). So I went with full counter-clockwise.

So, full pre-load and softest compression and rebound for both front and rear. I am happy with the result on both bikes. Feels a bit softer, but still pretty firm and very sure footed.
 

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This is weird. Am I the only one whose manual does NOT have “FORK”preload adjustment instructions.
Oh yes, you must have that one manual that does not mention fork pre-load. There have been rumors about that. I understand that the bike that came with the so-called "Short Manual" may also have an alignment issue. J/k.

There is no mention of fork pre-load in the manual, but there are online videos of Showa fork pre-load adjustments, and that Gold Nut atop the forks does appear to be for that purpose.

I don't think that either the front or rear pre-load on the Scrambler 1200 suspension actually does very much.

Please let me know how Triumphs replies. I may measure my bikes alignment.
 

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Oh yes, you must have that one manual that does not mention fork pre-load. There have been rumors about that. I understand that the bike that came with the so-called "Short Manual" may also have an alignment issue. J/k.

There is no mention of fork pre-load in the manual, but there are online videos of Showa fork pre-load adjustments, and that Gold Nut atop the forks does appear to be for that purpose.

I don't think that either the front or rear pre-load on the Scrambler 1200 suspension actually does very much.

Please let me know how Triumphs replies. I may measure my bikes alignment.
I will keep you informed as to Triumphs answer, but at the moment they tried to tell me that the misalignment is down to "tolerance stack". To me that sounds like an alternative to, accumulation of errors. I have now involved the DVSA to investigate .(dot) I think you would cal it.
 

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BTW, anyone remove the air snorkel under the seat?
Yes, I took it out last week and have put a few hundred miles on it without. I also changed the air filter to a DNA oiled serviceable filter from A&J Cycles. I feel a slight improvement in the engine, feels a tad sportier and pulls harder, I found myself holding out to higher RPMs before shifting as the fun was multipled, but this is very subjective and the bike is still pretty new to me. The sound might have improved a little... same sound just a little less stifled. No new starting/stalling issues yet.


Thanks for confirming that counter-clockwise on the gold nut increased height, stiffness, and preload on the forks!
 

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Yes, I took it out last week and have put a few hundred miles on it without. I also changed the air filter to a DNA oiled serviceable filter from A&J Cycles. I feel a slight improvement in the engine, feels a tad sportier and pulls harder, I found myself holding out to higher RPMs before shifting as the fun was multipled, but this is very subjective and the bike is still pretty new to me. The sound might have improved a little... same sound just a little less stifled. No new starting/stalling issues yet.


Thanks for confirming that counter-clockwise on the gold nut increased height, stiffness, and preload on the forks!
I just took out the snorkel and I'd swear it sounds louder and grunt-ier when I fully open up the throttle. I can't tell for sure because I am either at red line or doing 1000 mph in about 3 seconds.

I should mention that the XC does not have the pre-load front fork nut. Maybe pre-load is not mentioned in the manual because it is not functional on the XE? It did not seem to do much, but neither did the rear pre-load adjustment.
 

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I will keep you informed as to Triumphs answer, but at the moment they tried to tell me that the misalignment is down to "tolerance stack". To me that sounds like an alternative to, accumulation of errors. I have now involved the DVSA to investigate .(dot) I think you would cal it.
Have you adjusted the alignment? What did your dealer say about all this?
 

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Have you adjusted the alignment? What did your dealer say about all this?
Have you adjusted the alignment? What did your dealer say about all this?
I felt that my XE was letting too many sharp bumps thorough the suspension. To the extent that some road surfaces would induce traction control activation under hard acceleration in the first 3 gears.

I have just settled on my own suspension preferences for the XE.
Front, open settings for comp and rebound damping, 4 turns out ( comfort settings as per manual). Drop the yokes/trees/triple clamps by 20 mm ( lower the front).

Rear, compression and rebound set to the comfort setting as per the manual. 5 turns of rear preload applied. This is as much as i could apply by hand. I lifted the bike using my ABBA skylift so could apply 5 turns rear preload by hand .

Rider weighs 100Kg
Before rear preload adjustment (zero turns)
Static Sag 58 mm
Rider Sag 108mm

Post adjustment 5 turns preload rear
Static Sag 49mm
Rider Sag 97mm

This adjustment in shock stroke position (11mm longer) has allowed the suspension to move more quickly and so absorbed the sharp road bumps, as it is on average 11mm further down the rising rate curve and in a more open part of the comp damping circuit. I would have liked to have applied more preload but I feel that I am eating into the soft portion of the spring stroke. I am happy with suspension now for 2 reasons, it is more compliant whist maintaining good damping , AND I made the changes, so it feels like my bike. :)
 
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