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I can definitely appreciate your experience and dedication to excellence in these matters. Retaining the stock look is important to me, which you have accomplished. I was just curious as to how much of an impact the divider had, overall. My approach to converters (on cars) has been to chisel out the catalyst from an end port. It looks a little more difficult with this unit but hopefully I could get by with more minor surgery.
 

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I can definitely appreciate your experience and dedication to excellence in these matters. Retaining the stock look is important to me, which you have accomplished. I was just curious as to how much of an impact the divider had, overall. My approach to converters (on cars) has been to chisel out the catalyst from an end port. It looks a little more difficult with this unit but hopefully I could get by with more minor surgery.
That's the purpose of this post, step by step instructions.
The cat comes out in one piece and when followed closely, fool proof and easy (I did the first two decats the hard way and learnt what I have shared here...
Thanks for the explanation, Peter. Very helpful to hear about some of the detail that goes into it. Defeinelty not looking to cut corners which is why I'm trying to understand what's the best way to go about this. Unfortunately, where I live I have not yet met someone like yourself that has this sort of knowledge and skill that I'd be confident handing my Scrambler over to. If I was there, I'd have it over to you in a heartbeat. The better I understand the process and different ways people have gone about it + the pros and cons, the better equipped I'll be to explain it to any fabricator/metal worker I do find. Thanks again for the detailed insight. Much appreciated.
Look around your local area for a stainless steel fabricator specialising sheet metal products, food processing equipment and one off art pieces, with bikes in the car park .
 

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Did a run to Queen Mary Falls with a group of friends today, dodging bushfires. After 331km the bike took just 13.71 litres of fuel, which works out at 68 miles per imperial gallon. Pretty sure the decat is a contributing factor, as well as running a rear sprocket with two less teeth than stock.
I too have found that 65-70 mpg very achievable on a 1200 Thruxton. The bike testers who get 40 mpg must be constantly "screwing the ring" off their test bikes.
 

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You may find that those lower figures are based on US gallons.
As long as I ride without wringing it’s neck (too often), my Thruxton uses less fuel than my Street Scrambler, the wife’s Street Triple RS and way less than my Tiger 800 did. I have gone one tooth up on the front sprocket, which no doubt helps, but there’s no substitute for torque when it comes to fuel efficiency.
 

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Pjay55,

Thanks for sharing. That post is timely for me. I have that modification planned for my 2019 SS. Now I know the pitfalls. Regarding the separating plate, I had planned to install sections of properly-sized tubing inside the case to direct the flow, yet allow some interaction between the two exhaust streams. Your solution seems much more elegant. Am I correct in assuming that the plate is not "end-to-end", but allows some mixing of the two streams?
Once again, thank you for posting this (especially the pictures), you have saved more than one of us some headaches.

Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
All the thanks is due to Peter from Meerkat, I just had the opportunity to document the process with my camera. Your assumption about Peter's plate placement is correct.
 
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