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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I installed the Scottoiler on my Thruxton back in 2007 when I purchased the bike. It was previously fitted to my Daytona 955i, with a Dual Injector.

Here's some photos for those of you thinking of installing one on your Thruxton/Bonneville/Scrambler - not sure about Speedmasters or America's as their air-box is different.

Here's a view of the RHS side-panel, you can just make out the oil delivery tube exiting below next to the brake line.


With the side-panel removed you can see the Scottoiler position - nice and vertical! The bracket for the Scottoiler is provided, I just screwed it into a spare, threaded, hole in the air-box.


The fusebox had to be raised a little to make room. Also I had to cut the tab off of the adjuster ring on the top of the Scottoiler itself to stop it rubbing on the inside of the side-panel (you can see it at position 3 in this photo).


The vacuum connection if plug and play - just route the tubing, fit the adapter T-piece, remove the Triumph cap and fit. Here it's on the RHS carb.


The business end. I reused the Dual Injector mount to fit the single injector - so that black bracket isn't included with the standard kit - however there are other brackets and such in there.


Here she is - with the Scottoiler out of sight where mischievous little fingers can't get at it!! :D
 

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I like the mount off the swing arm. I mounted mind off the axle, and every time I adjust my chain the mount wants to shift. This requires a screwdriver jambed in to hold in place while tightening the axle. Not ideal.

Here is my question: when I adjust the flow to spec, I end up with an oil mess all over my wheel. What's your experience?

I adjust according the manual.

1. Ride bike 10 min. to warm up.
2. Leave bike idling.
3. Adjust to 1 drop per minute

Is one drop be minute excessive?

Do do measure the drops with the tip of the hose touching the sprocket, or pulled away to get a true drop into the air.

I have my bike all apart for winter maintenance, and I'm thinking about abandoning the Scottoiler and going back to 200 mile spraying. Please convince me otherwise. I love the concept of this product.

Sincerely, "Man with a Mess"
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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Oh yea. Love it behind the cover. Given that oil only required every 1,000 miles, it's a good time to remove the cover to check the brake fluid.

Oh yea, another question.

My oiler's flow rate seems to be quite sensitive to temperature. I even run red in the summer.

How often do you adjust flow to accommodate for temp changes?

PS: hope this isn't considered a hyjack shifting from thread about beautiful install to a discussion of my greasy rear wheel!?!? Just thought it was a good chance to ask an obvious Scottoiler expert a few questions about operation.

Let me repeat, love the install, and love the bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here is my question: when I adjust the flow to spec, I end up with an oil mess all over my wheel. What's your experience?

Is one drop be minute excessive?

I'm thinking about abandoning the Scottoiler and going back to 200 mile spraying. Please convince me otherwise. I love the concept of this product.
There is no standard setting really. There can be a huge difference between one oiler and the next - this is my second unit, replaced under guarantee, as the first one delivered too much oil on it's minimum setting even though I changed to summer (thicker) oil.

I adjust to one drop (air drops) every 1m30s - 1m40s, assuming that the chain is already well oiled. If I run out of oil and it gets a bit dry I'll up the rate to maybe 1m or 1m20s until the chain is again well lubed.

You flow is excessive IMHO - increase the time between drops by at least 30 seconds.

To convince you otherwise: that´s easy!. How's about this, all from my own personal experience with Scottoilers over the last 8 years or so.

1) My Daytona 955i (140+ BHP at the wheel) was sold on with 44,000km on the clock. The chain was adjusted just three times in all that time and when I delivered it as part-exchange for the Thruxton the dealer thanked me for "having installed a new chain and sprockets" and gave me €150 more on the part-ex price. They were 100% original.

2) I transfered the Scottoiler to my Thruxton (no extra cost) and have adjusted the chain twice in 36,000km. The chain and sprockets are as-new.

3) The Daytona would have "chewed" a C&S kit in about 20,000km - I thus saved over €200 on this and made an extra €150 on the sale price of the bike.

4) The Thruxton would probably have needed a new C&S kit at maybe 30,000km, I am therefore saving around €150 right now.

5) My chain is "as-new", no sloppy gear-changes, no nasty "worn-chain" noises from the rear-end - the bike is as smooth as the day I bought her.

6) I don't have to clean my chain and I don't have to use sticky, ucky, gooey, chain oil sprays. Neither do I have to buy them. I'm on my third bottle of oil (€6/half litre) over a total of 80,000km. You can even use engine oil if it's thin enough, I'm considering trying USED engine oil in an attempt to recycle, however I dunno if this is gonna screw up the O or X rings in the chain or not.

7) At €120 (+ €12 for oil) the Scottoiler has cost me just €16.50 per 10,000km. It has directly saved me around €350 in C&S's plus an indirect €150. I have bought NO chain lube sprays and haven't got my hands, or garage, dirty using them.

8) I don't need to adjust my chain every 800km (as the manual states) as I only need to do this on average every 16,000km. I see no reason why my C&S won't last upto 70-80,000km - whereby others will probably buy 2 or 3 C&S kits in that time - cost aprox. €300.

Ok, the back wheel does get oiled up every now and then but I've never had any oil on the actual tyre - just on the sidewall. Never been a problem. On the wheel the oil actually protects and is sooooo easy to clean off - no need to scrub or use the harsh degreasing agents which are needed for normal chain sprays.

Enough already, you guys are starting to think I have shares in the company or something! :eek:
 

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Gary Spain: thanks for the the info! I will go to 1:30 for "air drops" and it should make a difference.

My only hassle with my Bonneville after 1 year and 25,000 miles is the chain and sprockets. I've been through 3 chains and a set of sprockets. Part of this is my fault. I replaced the original factory chain on a trip when it started clicking severely on acceleration. With no Triumph dealers around I got a cheap chain with a clip at a Yamaha dealer. That chain lasted 5,000 miles before I found myself in the same situation and did the same thing. Now. I'm replacing with a Triumph continuous chain, and with your advice I hope to get lots of miles out of it.

Thanks again,
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Its advisable to always replace chain AND sprockets. If the sprocket teeth are shark toothed then you chain will wear much faster as it lifts itself out of the sprocket when running.

A bad sprocket looks something like this:
 

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I agree on replacing sprockets with chains. My last two chains were replaced on trips when I had plans and time deadlines to meet. A clicking chain drives me crazy, so I found a Yamaha dealer, both times, with a clip type chain and replaced.

Question: I've never had a chain break. Do you have any idea how close a chain is to failure when it starts to noticeably click on acceleration?

Here is my front sprocket the I replaced:



Hear is my shiny new rear sprocket:

 

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Discussion Starter #10
Question: I've never had a chain break. Do you have any idea how close a chain is to failure when it starts to noticeably click on acceleration?
I've only ever seen one chain actually break - and that was at a race meet at Oulton Park 20-odd years ago. The chain broke and just laid itself down on the track in a perfectly straight line :eek: The rider didn't come off, just rolled to a stop. :)

I think that on a road bike, before a chain actually snaps, it would probably jump off the sprockets due to wear. Of course that's a very dangerous situation coz we're talking at least a serious rear wheel lock-up and at most severe leg/ankle injury. :(
 
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