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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forchetto's recommendation has me ready to pull the trigger on a Scottoiler.

Now I'm looking for thoughts on the benefits of the E vs. V versions. The Scottoiler website seems to promote the electronic version over the vacume driven model. I like simplicity.

Any suggestions?
 

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Hello

I have used the V Scottoiler on three bikes with excellent results. E version is more expensive and presumably more complicated. Simplicity and lower cost does it for me.
 

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I have used the V Scottoiler on three bikes with excellent results. E version is more expensive and presumably more complicated. Simplicity and lower cost does it for me.
+1. I have no experience with the E version, but very good experience with the V version. Once you find the correct vacuum take-off to make the thing work, installation is quite straightforward.

Expect a significantly increased chain/sprocket life. My '00 VFR800 had the originals on at 90,000km.

The only downside on my Thruxton is that the chainguard is shorter than on a Bonneville so there is more chance of 'fling' from the chain if you have the metering set too high.
 

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I have had a few "V" versions and once you get them dialled in, they just work. I would strongly recommend buying the optional dual injector, it makes metering much more precise so you get less mess and more oil where it's supposed to be. You can also adjust the flow way down- I have had 2000 miles out of a single fill.
 

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2009 Bonnie A-1. 1968 T120R
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I have the "V" and really like it. I, too, looked at the electronic version and found myself leaning toward a more 'natural' flow of oil (gravity).
I recommend the dual injector in that it gets both sides of the chain and does make metering a snap.
I don't know what year your T-100 is but I did a bit of round & round insofar as to which vacuum tube to tap into. So you might want to be very sure. I found a tube that only created vacuum when the throttle is turned (it runs top to bottom below and behind the airbox - I can post a pic if you're interested).
-Sparky
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
On the E vs. V issue, all confirm my inclination. It also looks like the E has an ugly electronic box mounted on the handle bar. Uggg.

Sparky, please send pic. My T-100 is a 2010. Any help finding best placement for vacume tube will also be appreciated.
 

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2009 Bonnie A-1. 1968 T120R
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Sparky, please send pic. My T-100 is a 2010. Any help finding best placement for vacume tube will also be appreciated.
I'll try to remember to post it tonight when I get home.:)
 

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You can either connect the vacuum pipe to the take-off point just under the TPS (Throttle position sensor) on the LH throttle body, which is what the maker's instructions say, or use the one indicated on the photo below.

This one has vacuum as soon as the engine is running, whereas the other only after 3000 rpm or so.

The makers reason that because our bikes have that fairly rare feature of a right hand chain drive, the point with full vacuum could drip oil onto rear tyre if left idling on the sidestand for long periods.

Note that on the photo there's also two vacuum points: The rear one is the equivalent of the one found on the LH throttle body, but the other one towards the front has vacuum all the time.




There's a recent thread here discussing various aspects of the fitting:

http://www.triumphrat.net/twins-technical-talk/90319-scottoiler-installation-revisited.html
 

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2009 Bonnie A-1. 1968 T120R
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I remembered!



This is my first posting of a picture. Sheesh; not the easiest thing in the world!

A big thanks to Propforward for his tutorial on posting photos.

-Sparky
 

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I don't know what Scottoiler are driving at with the E-system. It's three times the price, it has the ugly controller, and there is no extra benefit that I can see. The V-system works perfectly well. There's nothing to improve.

I suspect it is aimed at gadget freaks who simply must have a digital readout for everything they do. The V-system is simple, robust and reliable, and it does everything you need it to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks to all. My order is in. Really appreciate having your experience available.

I'm headed to Laconia Bike Week today in the rain!
 

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The only issue I've found with the V system is that the oil flow changes with ambient temperature as the oil thins, other than that I agree, nothing to improve.
I like the idea of it only chirping in above 3000RPM but surely that makes it difficult to set-up initially?
 

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The only issue I've found with the V system is that the oil flow changes with ambient temperature as the oil thins, other than that I agree, nothing to improve.
They offer a standard and high temprature oil, the latter which is thicker. I live in a whacky place where the winters get to the teens (F) and the summer gets 100+ (F). I have to swap out the oil twice a year.
-Sparky
 

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They offer a standard and high temprature oil, the latter which is thicker. I live in a whacky place where the winters get to the teens (F) and the summer gets 100+ (F). I have to swap out the oil twice a year.
-Sparky
It's not so much ambient temperature which is the problem, we don't get it that hot in the UK and I don't ride in the winter, it's more that as the bike heats up it transfers heat to the oiler and thins it, I need to set it for when it warms up and not when it's cold.
 

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It's not so much ambient temperature which is the problem, we don't get it that hot in the UK and I don't ride in the winter, it's more that as the bike heats up it transfers heat to the oiler and thins it, I need to set it for when it warms up and not when it's cold.
Mine's mounted on the frame behind the RH side panel, and engine heat doesn't affect it. Perhaps mount it somewhere cooler?

Useful hint for setting up:

Take the vacuum elbow off the spigot on the carb (still connected to the vacuum pipe), put a length of clear tubing in it firmly, and have a Mole wrench handy. Suck like mad on the end of the tube until you can see the valve move up in the reservoir (you can also hear a slight click as it moves). Clamp the Mole grips on the clear tubing before releasing the vacuum with your mouth. If you have done it right, the valve will stay open as if the engine is running, and you can adjust the flow rate until it's right. Remove Mole grips, put the elbow back on the carb, and you're done.

Setting the flow rate can take 20 minutes or so, and this way you can do it without the engine running and annoying the dog/wasting fuel/choking with fumes. It worked perfectly for me. The key is getting the right size of tubing that will make an airtight fit in the elbow. I used windscreen washer tube.
 

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Mine's mounted on the frame behind the RH side panel, and engine heat doesn't affect it. Perhaps mount it somewhere cooler?
That's where I put mine, too. Makes for a straightforward installation because it is a fairly short distance from both the vacuum source and where the delivery spigot will end up on the rear sprocket.

As the summer gets warmer hereabouts (it can get up to 100f) I just add progressively thicker weight oil when it is time to top up the reservoir.
 

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Mine's mounted on the frame behind the RH side panel, and engine heat doesn't affect it. Perhaps mount it somewhere cooler?

Useful hint for setting up:

Take the vacuum elbow off the spigot on the carb (still connected to the vacuum pipe), put a length of clear tubing in it firmly, and have a Mole wrench handy. Suck like mad on the end of the tube until you can see the valve move up in the reservoir (you can also hear a slight click as it moves). Clamp the Mole grips on the clear tubing before releasing the vacuum with your mouth. If you have done it right, the valve will stay open as if the engine is running, and you can adjust the flow rate until it's right. Remove Mole grips, put the elbow back on the carb, and you're done.

Setting the flow rate can take 20 minutes or so, and this way you can do it without the engine running and annoying the dog/wasting fuel/choking with fumes. It worked perfectly for me. The key is getting the right size of tubing that will make an airtight fit in the elbow. I used windscreen washer tube.
Apologies BD for any confusion, I don't have one on the Triumph just yet, I have it on the Honda and it's mounted under the front seat (where the ABS would be if it had it) it's a good clean installation but does mean it gets a little warm (from all angles if I've had a curry). I need to have another look at it as I have a dual outlet nozzle to install it's ok once it's set up for warm just means I don't get any lube for the first mile or so, shouldn't be a problem.
 
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