Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
That's an awful description of the problem I think but, Its an awful noise too. That's screeching not scheeching.

This is occurring in cold weather 40 degrees and below when the bike is warmed somewhat but probably not fully warmed, 5-10 minutes into the ride. This usually happens on the way to work when the temps are in the 30's, somewhere about 4000 rpm this "screech" occurs, located in the left front of the bike/engine. Clutching doesn't help nor does simply reducing my RPM's. I have to physically slow the bike, get over on the shoulder, it stops screeching usually just before I have to stop. This happened once last year. Some times if I "pop" the clutch inadvertently I get a quick "screech" same noise, but just for a second, as the one I'm describing. So I'm thinking clutch.

I should have used my PDA to see if I could have grabbed a sound file, just thought of it. Could it be that the 15/50 oil is too viscous for these Wisconsin mornings?

Thoughts.
 

·
Driftless Admin
2008 Bonneville Black
Joined
·
12,238 Posts
I get the short version of the screech when downshifting on a cold morning. I have a steep decline about a mile from my house and I get it there predictably as I shift down to scrub speed on a cold morning. Mine sounds a bit like a little terrier being surprised by a kick to the rump (I would guess). Obviously the clutch is complaining a bit. I'm not worried about that sound, unless someone tells me I should be. That longer one you get sounds a bit more worrisome though, wish I knew the answer for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'll try the lubing. The Haynes manual doesn't address how to do that. Any suggentions for that? There's the possibility of low engine oil according to the manual, I just read that. It's not likely as I triple checked the level after I changed out the winter oil...but, I'll do it again before the next ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
schreeching noise

Yes, I've had that problem too, '05 T100, below 40 degrees F it's fairly common. Some folks have had success with lubing the cable. I had no luck with that and sent the speedo to a shop, they lubed the innards and that seemed to take care of it. However they were not able to recalabrate it (notoriously innacurate units) If anybody knows of a speedo shop with experience on these I would love to know their name

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, I've had that problem too, '05 T100, below 40 degrees F it's fairly common. Some folks have had success with lubing the cable. I had no luck with that and sent the speedo to a shop, they lubed the innards and that seemed to take care of it. However they were not able to recalabrate it (notoriously innacurate units) If anybody knows of a speedo shop with experience on these I would love to know their name

Paul
This is making some sense to me in that I'm not having clutch problems. It shifts great even when the noise is at its worst. If its the speedo is the noise worrisome but benign or is it something that could break something serious.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
629 Posts
Hmmm, I think your bike is completely broken.
You should give it to me and just drive your car.
:p

Just kidding, +1 on checking the speedo cable. My Shadow did that exact thing until I sprayed some oil in there.
-K
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,849 Posts
I'll try the lubing. The Haynes manual doesn't address how to do that. Any suggentions for that?
Unscrew the Phillips screw holding the bottom of the speedo cable at the wheel hub; an extra-long screwdriver is helpful for this. Pull the cable off the hub and pull the cable out of the sheath.

Clean it with some WD40 or paint thinner on a rag, dry off, and use your fingers to smear a light coat of grease on the entire length of the cable. Once clean, keep the cable off the garage floor etc, so it does not pick up grit.

Push the cable back in. If you can't get it in the last few inches, chuck it lightly in a drill and spin it in slowly--it'll go in no time. Seat the bottom end in the hub--pay attention to the slot so it engages properly--and re-insert the screw.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top