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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

I own a 2014 Triumph Scrambler and although I absolutely love this bike I am a 5.2 female and can just reach the ground in tall boots, wanting to change the suspension to make things abit easier but have been told it needs a lowering kit to do this.
Cant seem to get an actual reason why I cant just straight swap the Scrambler Shocks for Bonnieville shocks..
Anyone who knows these bikes have advice? >:)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Swap Scrambler shocks for Bonnie Shocks?

Hi there,

Im Chloe, have been riding since I was 14 (motocross) but after an accident Im solely a road rider and love it

My pride and joy is a 2014 Triumph Scambler and although I absolutely love this bike I am a 5.2 and can just reach the ground in tall boots, wanting to change the suspension to make things abit easier but have been told it needs a lowering kit to do this.
Cant seem to get an actual reason why I cant just straight swap the Triumph Shocks for Bonnieville shocks..
Anyone who knows these bikes have advice?

Cheers
 

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It's been done before, go for it. You can also loosen the fork pinch bolts and raise the fork tubes 15 mm to lower the front. If you move the forks too far past 15 mm the fender might hit the R/R when the going gets rough.
 

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Awesome thank you. I was worried it would affect the handling but good to know it has been done before successfully.
Have wondered that in the past people are just trying to sell me a lowering kit saying that I cant straight swap Bonnie shocks onto the scambler.
Not much room between the top of the folks and the bars but could get 10mm out of it. The rear end of the scrambler sits quite high anyway... see what its like when we swap them over. Appreciate your help
 

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I personally wouldn't go further than 10mm with the front forks, mine are currently at 5mm. I'm probably going down the same road with 340mm rear shocks. Another option that does help is a narrower seat.

So you get an idea of how it can look here is another member's bike lowered to Bonnie type spec:



I think it looks better.........

On a side issue your header pipes are fitted the wrong way around, they should cross over as per the stock originals and the above photo. They are quite often fitted this way, the wrong way IMO, not sure why, maybe it's just because they can be!

I would like to see some photos (especially side on as per this one above) when completed please.
 

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Just a little info on the seat deal that Boy Racer mentioned, the seat that you currently have on your bike sits much lower then the seat on the bike that he pictured(I dont mean to imply that he was suggesting that seat specifically) just that you're trying to lower your bike and that stock seat, albeit the most uncomfortable thing I have ever sat on, is fairly low, much lower then the single seat. I have both and use both but the single sits maybe 1" to 2" higher.
 

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Delboy's video shows how to lower the ride height on a Scrambler by using shorter shocks and then cutting down the spacers in the front forks.....
 

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Delboy's video shows how to lower the ride height on a Scrambler by using shorter shocks and then cutting down the spacers in the front forks.....
Cutting spacers and reducing suspension travel seams rather drastic. By relocating the R/R you could remove the fork springs and raise the fork tubes (with the wheel up against the stops) to see how far you could go before the fender hit the bottom tree. If that and a narrower seat as was suggested and a shorter shock isn't enough you could shorten the spacer as little as necessary to retain as much fork travel as you can. That travel might come in handy on rough terrain.
 

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See my PM to you. You can have my 2005 OEM Bonneville shocks if that works for you.

I assume that you can swap them, but I don't know that. I guess that the Scrambler shocks are longer?

There's information around this forum about dealing with your situation, a search might reveal some useful threads about it.
 

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Any air cooled wire wheeled Bonneville shocks will be a straight swap and be about an inch shorter. Scramblers and Thruxtons have the same length shocks. Lowering the rear will slow down the steering a little bit, make it more stable to an extent. You could slide the fork tubes up the triple trees a little to keep it the same as you have now, couldn't tell you by how much as the angles of the shocks and forks are different I think. There are fork lowering kits available I believe , I'd be inclined (no pun intended) to see how you get on with the shocks first. Should be lots of stock shocks around for not much money, usually the first thing people upgrade. Also, the seat off an alloy wheel Bonneville is lower, maybe an inch and is also a straight swap. Doesn't look as good though in my humble opinion, but I am a guy with six different seats for my T100 so who am I to say? Some would advise stacked boots, but shifting may be an issue, as was falling down stairs in the 70s in my glam rock chimney stack phase.
FWIW the reason I have a Scrambled T100 is because the 2006 Scrambler on the showroom floor was too tall.
 

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Hi there Chloe.

If you go the Bonnie shocks and lowering the forks measure it before you begin. Thats vertically beside the rear shock and the triple tees. Then fit the new rear shocks and re-measure the distance you have now at the back.

That will give you the measurement to lower the front triple tees and will bring it back to level, so to speak but lower overall.

If you need a hand with this I am 2hs ride from you and can sort it for ya if you bring some shocks.

Mo
 

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So here is what matters and what you can preserve.

The rake of the bike and the resulting fork angle are what determine the quickness of the handling.

So in stock form you have a 13 1/2 inch shock.

If you lower the rear with a shock that has, lets say, 12 inches eye to eye then how much does that reduce your fork angle? It is that fork angle that really defines how your bike turns, turns in and turns out.

So can you slide those front fork tubes up the triple tree enough to preserve your original fork angle?

You may find that you can both reduce the rear shock travel and lower the front end and preserve the delightful front end rake you had while still lowering the bike overall a bit.

I have about a 27 degree fork rake on an SE and the handling is light and excellent. If you lower your rear end and do not recover the front fork rake you will feel like your bike handles a bit slower.
 

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Welcome to the forum Chloe.

My wife, Leonie is 5' and 3/4" and and owns a Thruxton (same height as the Scrambler) and could only tip toe when it was standard length/ height. I lowered her Thruxton to Bonnie height by lowering the triple tree through the forks and installing Bonnie length shocks.

Her's has the clip on and I installed them above the triple tree but you have handle bars and would have to worry about that part.

There are several seats available that fit over the rails or have less foam and this makes a huge difference but it really depends on your comfort versus need to touch the ground.

It is all very easy to do and makes a big difference to the confidence level in being able to flat foot it at a stand still. You'll still need to watch where you park.

Have a look at the links below.

Good luck with it all and tell us how you go.

https://www.triumphrat.net/air-cooled-twins-talk/235771-lowering-the-triumph-thruxton.html

https://www.triumphrat.net/air-cool...lowering-my-wifes-thruxton-i-need-advice.html
 

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I merged the two threads together to keep all the great advice in one spot. Hope it does not mess anyone up.
 

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just a question as an innocent (well, maybe not very innocent) bystander. Lowering the bike will effectively make the sidestand longer. Does the bike lean enough that the stock sidestand is okay? A friend of mine loered his 800 tiger had to get a different sidestand.
 

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Hi there,

Im Chloe, have been riding since I was 14 (motocross) but after an accident Im solely a road rider and love it

My pride and joy is a 2014 Triumph Scambler and although I absolutely love this bike I am a 5.2 and can just reach the ground in tall boots, wanting to change the suspension to make things abit easier but have been told it needs a lowering kit to do this.
Cant seem to get an actual reason why I cant just straight swap the Triumph Shocks for Bonnieville shocks..
Anyone who knows these bikes have advice?

Cheers

I don’t really have anything to add to the advice that been given on the suspension. However, I hope you won’t mind if I point out that your header pipes have been connected incorrectly. If you look at the pic that @Boy Racer posted you will see that RH pipe crosses over the LH pipe and sits below it at the collector. On your bike they don’t cross over.

It’s actually not uncommon to see them set up like yours with maybe 10% of Arrow exhausts fitted that way. Even David Beckham had his done the wrong way. It probably doesn’t matter too much but I think just looks a bit odd.

Also @blkvsn asked about the side stand. I know when I had my Scrambler the bike leaned over a long way on the stand so it’s possible that you’ll be able to lower the bike a little with modifying the side stand. Just be careful not to have it sitting too upright.

Love the bike, by the way. Mine was the same colour as yours.
 

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just a question as an innocent (well, maybe not very innocent) bystander. Lowering the bike will effectively make the sidestand longer. Does the bike lean enough that the stock sidestand is okay? A friend of mine lowered his 800 tiger had to get a different sidestand.
I had a cut a shut on my wife's side stand and had the push down knob lengthened at the same time. Click on the link :)

https://www.triumphrat.net/air-cooled-twins-technical-talk/455834-thruxton-side-stand-cut-and-shut.html
 

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I have the same Scram and have swapped to an Arrow exhaust, and love it to bits. CanBerra is right to point out that your exhaust is installed wrong. It should look like the pic I've added here.

As to the height of the bike, the easiest thing you could do to start is to switch the seat. If you get one with a flatter profile you can cut a couple inches off the seat height. Something narrower can help, too, because your feet will reach the ground more easily. Also the stock seat is (at least for my backend) absolute murder that results in numbness throughout my legs, so it might be a major comfort upgrade. I switched to a solo seat, which has been better (still breaking in); I wouldn't recommend that model as a seat change in your case though, as, if anything, it adds a bit of height.
 

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