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Discussion Starter #1
I think everyone knows that Salt is no good for your bike (apart from the obvious reduction in risk of ice), however I got stuck behind a gritter the other day and could not get past for about 10 minutes. My bike and I were getting thoroughly covered in a fine powder from the cloud in its wake. I backed off to about 50 metres, and would have stopped completely and waited for a while if I wasn't in a hurry to get home. I could even taste the salt in the air I was breathing.

Anyway, I woke up this morning feeling dreadful. My throat is sore and my lungs feel like they have been burnt. I have a really dry cough, and my lungs feel itchy and irritated.

So my advice is: Don't ride behind a gritter.

Anybody out there got any tips or able to recommend the best way to treat my bike to get rid of the nasty salt dust? (when I recover from the affliction myself)
 

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Hose it down asap with cold water (not hot water), wash it with the usual cleaner and cold water then apply ACF 50 everywhere apart from the brakes and disks. Hope this helps.
 

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Your throat and lungs can recover. The bike will not unless you take immediate action.

All of the bare metal surfaces, less the anodized ones, will develop surface defects ranging from discoloration/staining up to and including corrosion. The first to go will be the gold cad fasteners. Depending on the moisture content/humidity, your electrical grounds could lose conductivity over time from this exposure.

Do what Granty advised. The only thing I would add is that you need to pull your fairings to do it properly. Do it now!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks

Sonds like I have a busy day today then! Still feel rubbish, but as you say, I will recover - my bike doesn't have an immune system!
 

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Does your bike really get damaged That fast?

I know my bikes looking like crap today after going up and down the m4. Not been behind any gritters but they have been out for sure.

I've not had time to wash it off and tomorrow I'll be heading in again. I dont get back till after dark and by then the temperature is around 0 and dont want to throw water on the bike just for it to freeze up. The bikes 7 years old and in good but not perfect condition and I'm not going to be too over protective about keeping it perfect.

So what do I do?
 

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Hi mate...

Re: avoiding corrosion etc... Don't bother with Scottoiler F365, it's rubbish (washes off at the first sign of rain). Okay if you spray it on your metal bits after every ride in the wet (personally am far too lazy for that!) but otherwise not as good as it makes out to be.

The answer is ACF-50 Anti-Corrosion Spray... brilliant! My 3 year old, 31,000 mile Tiger lived outdoors in all weathers (and was ridden in them too), and when I part ex'd it in for my new Sprint, there was no corrosion!

So far my 6 month old Sprint (also lives outdoors) still comes up like new (all the bolts still shine!). AFC-50 doesn't get washed off by the rain and works very well. Even the underside of the exhaust shows no rust and the bike has been ridden on the mega-salty roads of the UK quite a bit recently.

Russ
 

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The rate of corrosion on a bike is going to be relative to the degree of salinity on your roads. Some will never have to worry about it, while others need to take the appropriate preventative measures.

Evidence of salt induced corrosion can happen in as little as two days. I was once on a trip and stopped for the night in a motel, not realizing that I was about a 1/4 mile from the ocean. It stormed that night and continued for another day. When I could get to the bike, the corrosion had already started on the gold cad bits. :mad:

I am now a firm believer in ACF-50.

http://www.corrosion-control.com/acf50.html
 

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ArtA, basically I spray in on all the metal bits - centre stand unit, rear suspension parts, bolts, nuts, exposed engine casing, exhaust etc, although I don't bother so much with the handlebar metal, apart from brushing the lever bolts etc...

Don't be worried about the initial 5 minute smoke/smell on starting your bike afterwards, it soon passes :) And also don't worry about it getting on the paintwork. I was never so careful not to hit the mudguard/fairing plastics and it never seemed to harm anything

HOWEVER (and this is important), when you get to the wheel area, spray a bit in a small container (I use an old egg cup!) and use a paint brush to brush it on. It's easy to get carried away and accidentaly spray some on your brake disks or pads by mistake. so be careful. It won't damage them but your brakes won't work properly (experience from the 1st time I used it)! I also use a brush to dab the fairing bolts, brake caliper bolts - be careful! - Doesn't take long, 20 minutes max...

There is plenty of spray in a tin (used 5 times in a year and have only just finished my last tin) and once it's on you don't have to worry so much, even if your bike gets filthy. I washed my Tiger about once every couple of months and put a fresh application on then. Probably didn't need it but it certainly worked!

Give it a try
 

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As ever, this board is full of useful information - I had never heard of that stuff before, I have just ordered two cans (to amortize shipping costs better) and will follow your advice when it arrives. :cool:
 

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The most economical way to buy ACF is the litre bottle rather than the aerosols. You get much more for your money in the long term for a little bit more effort decanting it into the supplied pump spray bottle.
 

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Acf 50

Was just about to start a new thread but noticed ACF50's been discussed under this one. I've spent the most I've ever spent on a bike this summer ('06 Sprint) and want to keep it rust-free. I took the bodywork off and gave the bike a good spraying with ACF50. I've been on a couple of rides since and the bike got pretty dirty. I read somewhere that you just hose off the salt (but don't scrub the bike as it will bring off the ACF50). Even after a hosing, the bike still looked dirty around the rear shock. Is it really ok to leave the bike dirty? I've always washed bikes the best I can thru winter (although they've still rusted!). It just seems a risk relying on the ACF50, although most people rave about the stuff. Do people advocate re-applying ACF a few times thru the winter or will one application go all the way thru? Cheers, Tone
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Was just about to start a new thread but noticed ACF50's been discussed under this one. I've spent the most I've ever spent on a bike this summer ('06 Sprint) and want to keep it rust-free. I took the bodywork off and gave the bike a good spraying with ACF50. I've been on a couple of rides since and the bike got pretty dirty. I read somewhere that you just hose off the salt (but don't scrub the bike as it will bring off the ACF50). Even after a hosing, the bike still looked dirty around the rear shock. Is it really ok to leave the bike dirty? I've always washed bikes the best I can thru winter (although they've still rusted!). It just seems a risk relying on the ACF50, although most people rave about the stuff. Do people advocate re-applying ACF a few times thru the winter or will one application go all the way thru? Cheers, Tone
I second this question. I have been looking at getting my bike valeted and ACF50 sprayed by a chap who works through P&H in Crawley,UK. I was under the impression that it should last pretty well. Then at the end of the winter I was going to get it cleaned up again for the nice weather in the summer (based on the last 2 years, that'll be never then!)

I'm hijacking my own thread here, but I have another query about shocks - how do you keep them really clean? I thought my hugger would make a difference but that's been disappointing, I have seen some bikes with a mud flap that hangs down and seems to protect the shock. Any tips, I searched for "shock cleaning" but didn't find anything specific?:confused: apologies if I have missed previous threads on the subject.
 

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As long as you hose the salt off, the dirt won't cause corrosion problems. I'd apply ACF every few weeks if it looks like it needs it, or after a very thorough wash if it looks too clean! If you make sure the first application gets everywhere then subsequent coats are just top ups. ACF reacts with salt to render it less corrosive, delaying the onset of nasty rust which means less time spent cleaning :)
 

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The flap you refer to which protects the shock is standard on the ABS bikes to protect the control box.

I think, although I may be wrong. It's referred to on the parts list as the ABS shield.

As far as I'm aware it will fit straight onto the "standard" bike.
 

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Yes, the ABS shield also protects the shock, and it fits non ABS STs as well. Per usual practice, it does not come with the two mounting brackets and bolts. They must be ordered in addition to the shield.
 

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I second this question. I have been looking at getting my bike valeted and ACF50 sprayed by a chap who works through P&H in Crawley,UK. I was under the impression that it should last pretty well. Then at the end of the winter I was going to get it cleaned up again for the nice weather in the summer (based on the last 2 years, that'll be never then!)


Hey Unique I am also based in Crawley.. we should try to get together and ride out when the weather improves.

I had also heard that P & H offer the ACF-50 treatment. Do they take off the fairings to do it, I wonder? Fairing removal is not something that fills me with excitement!

I have used this ACF-50 stuff before. I lived in Florida, and had a 1963 Beechcraft Musketeer airplane (older than me!). It is a little 4 seat, single engine plane. I kept it at New Smyrna Beach airport which is very close to the ocean. The sea air is horrendous for corrosion on all metal objects and this plane, being as old as it was, was a prime candidate. I had it treated with the ACF-50 during it's annual inspections and it worked brilliantly. So much so that I went on to have the the entire fleet of training planes at the flying school where I worked treated. It is pretty expensive stuff (or used to be) but saves a fortune in the long run.

Best wishes,

James.
 

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I'm convinced!

An order going into tomorrow (there is a dealer in Southend).

:)
 

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I'm convinced too! I feel like treating my bike even though we don't need salt on the roads and I live 80km inland.

I just really think I need some. :)
 
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