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Continuing my work to bring this 76 Bonneville back to safe riding condition I am replacing the rear wheel bearings and tire. Here is a picture of the rust found, mostly on the nipples. How do I decide if the whole wheel is shot, just replace the spokes or simply clean, reassemble of go? The outside of the rim looks fine, minor surface rust, some light rust on nipples, no cracks or bent areas.
 

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if you are not going for "as new" -as long as the pic is representative of the general condition of the wheel i woul say it looks sound and safe - if you wire brush the inside of the rim and treat it with some form of rust treatment then you should be good to go -- be sure to neutralise the rust treatment if its instructions call for it
 

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Hi Rick, That amount of rust is common. I personally would not use rust stripper. I would just wire brush & paint with any of the rust preventing paints from hardware store. Some rims are very rusty & strength may be compromised. I don't see that on yours.

Last one I did I used Rustolum cold galvanizing compound spray paint. However I sprayed paint into butter tub, then brushed it on. That way I don't have to mask. This paint doesn't have a hard surface though.

I then let it dry a few days & paint over that with normal Rustoleum spray paint. I like machinery grey color. Let that dry a week or so if possible.

Some paint may wick by the nipples & show on top of rim. I then wipe the unwanted paint off with Berryman's carb cleaner & a cotton cloth.

After 3 years it seems to be holding up ok. That's when I did tire change.

I don't wash bike with water hose if possible but will if it gets too muddy. I usually just use a wet sponge & pail of water. I seldom ride in rain, but occasionally get stuck in rain while on a ride.
Don
 

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Great input here as usual. I thank you both. I'm not going for a "like new" restoration. I want safe, I want clean but its a 40 year old machine and that's ok with me.

Thanks again.
 

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Great input here as usual. I thank you both. I'm not going for a "like new" restoration. I want safe, I want clean but its a 40 year old machine and that's ok with me.

Thanks again.
Hi Rick.

My Tyre Guys ran the inside of my rims against a brass wire wheel mounted on an electric grinder.

This is the quickest way to remove most of the rust.

You can also get wire wheels which mount on a drill.

https://www.toolstation.com/shop/Power+Tool+Accessories/d80/Wire+Abrasives/sd1920/Abracs+Wire+Wheel+Brush/p50562



Also, if original, your spokes will be cad plated steel.

My spokes looked pretty shabby with lots of rust, so I spent a lot of time cleaning them with wire brushes mounted on a drill and dremel tool.

It will remove any remaining cad plating along with the rust, but that wasn't a great finish anyway.

The spokes now shine like chrome.

Yes, the spokes will eventually rust again, but I'm trying Clear Guard made by White Knight (Metal finish specialists) which will lock and preserve the spokes.

Or spray them with Eastwoods Diamond Clear.

http://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-diamond-clear-dtm-and-painted-surfaces-aerosol.html

A clear finish designed to be sprayed directly to metal.
 

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I would clean it up as well. Don’t forget that after you are done with cleaning, there is some adhesive tape (or rubber cover, I’m not sure) that goes on top of the spokes to protect the tube. If not protected, the spokes could puncture the tube.
I had no choice but to replace my spokes and regret it so much. If you dismantle your wheel you will have to do the following:
- Find the appropriate spoke size. It took me almost 3 months to find the proper ones.
- Re-lace your wheels using the proper offset numbers. This can be really tricky and you might have to pay someone to do it. To my knowledge, every bike has its own offset which could be different than the standard;
- Balance the tires again

I’m still going through the pain of doing all the steps above. It can be very time consuming. But I had no choice
Just my 2c…
 

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The spokes should be easy to obtain if you go to the right place
Most reputable wheel builders will have a book of the correct offsets- they are not unique to each bike.

You have the option of galvanised or stainless. Stainless can be blasted before building to look like galvanised.

My bikes always get stainless rims and spokes.
 

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Building a wheel,build a box first that the rim can sit on,then,build a platform that the centre sits on.It will look like a bottomless box with another inside it.Use on a flat surface. That is with the wheel before you cut out the spokes.You will then be able to build it to the existing offset.
I still have good original spokes in both wheels as i like to preserve most original parts.If you want a good finish on plated spokes,wheel silver spray looks good and can be dulled down a little by coating over with clear after the silver.
 

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Mine were like that, too. As people have suggested, I cleaned the rust off with a wire wheel on a portable drill, then applied a rust treatment. New rim strips. What annoys me most is that there are some rust flakes rattling inside the closed part of the rim, I can hear them when the wheel is off (hard to listen to a wheel when the bike is in motion!). After treatment, I keep ACF-50 on the spokes and outer rims to keep the rust off.
 

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Before cleaning the rim I always spent time making sure all the spoke nipples are free to turn. This may require a bit of heat but no where near red hot...Then I check the tension on the spokes and have to true the rim slightly in most situations

Buchanan's in California can supply any spoke for any wheel in plain steel or stainless for reasonable money.You may not be able to get the exact original style however...You may need to know actual spoke length , thickness and shape for some applications.
 

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The spokes should be easy to obtain if you go to the right place
Most reputable wheel builders will have a book of the correct offsets- they are not unique to each bike.

You have the option of galvanised or stainless. Stainless can be blasted before building to look like galvanised.

My bikes always get stainless rims and spokes.
With so many sources on the web, I thought so too. I guess I got unlucky, the first set I bought from a store in Montreal came with the wrong size. Took me months to convince them. Then I ordered from British cycle supply and they had in back order for a while :frown2:
Now I think I'm ok.
 

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yesterday notice my spokes rusted, well not much but it would get worse if leave it. am a bit shock as tot the spokes are stainless steel all this while. Did a few google the best way to keep it away from rust, the suggestion are endless ! chuck the ipad away and look at my available products, decide to go with WD40 to clean the rust and finish with a layer of Meguiars Metal Polysh. I do notice that the spokes holding the HUB, there were crevices where water could have gotten inside the hub. not sure what to do but spray WD40 into it, hopefully it will get into internal rust as am no DIY guy to strip open each spokes.

WOW....to change to a stainless steel spokes is not cheap, might as well live with it and polish occasionally. another new discovery or should i say a shocking discovery.
 

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With so many sources on the web, I thought so too. I guess I got unlucky, the first set I bought from a store in Montreal came with the wrong size. Took me months to convince them. Then I ordered from British cycle supply and they had in back order for a while <img src="http://www.triumphrat.net/images/TriumphRat_2015/smilies/tango_face_sad.png" border="0" alt="" title="Frown" class="inlineimg" />
Now I think I'm ok.
I really like Chris over at Moto Montreal but I've had a few quite dodgy pieces from him. He always changed them but I lost faith and went to walridge in most cases for less hassle.
 

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Hi
I had rust forming on some ‘Stainless Steel’ brake master cylinders that I bought.

When I looked into it, it seems Oxygen just attacks everything including Stainless Steel, the best advice I found was to clean with baking powder by rubbing, leave for an hour to react and then clean off. I then coated them with ACF-50 to protect them better.

It turns out that there are different grades of ordinary Stainless Steels,

The cheaper 400 series S/steel is steel and chromium (up to 18%). The chrome forms an Oxide layer protecting the steel, slowing down the rusting process of the metal.

The more expensive 304 contains Steel, Chromium and nickel (8-10%). Apparently the Nickel binds the chromium oxide in place to make the protective laver more impenetrable.

The most expensive 316 Stainless Steel contains Steel, Chromium, Nickel and molybdenum (2%). The molybdenum makes the Stainless Steel resistant to salts, acids and other nasty things. (They reckon about 1200 years before pitting occurs with 316 grade S/S)

If there are any metals experts to correct/confirm, it might be useful?


So I guess we got the cheap 400 series Stainless Steel on my master cylinders and your spokes. I felt kind of cheated as these were purchased for an exposed environment (including salted roads during winter in the UK).


Regards
Peg.
 

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ACF-50. I live in Hawaii and every piece of metal here rusts like crazy since the humidity is tropical sea air. My tools stay coated with Johnson's paste wax. The bikes are liberally coated with ACF-50 (based on advice on this forum). I just spray it onto a rag and then wipe it onto all the exposed metal. The spokes take a little while to wipe each one, but it definitely works. Don't know how long the stuff stays on. I only take my vintage bikes out a couple times a month and they are in a carport otherwise. I seem to need to redo it every six months or so. I assume if I washed the bikes weekly or something it would wash off.

The ACF-50 basically actually does what the WD-40 wished it could do.
 

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Great input here as usual. I thank you both. I'm not going for a "like new" restoration. I want safe, I want clean but its a 40 year old machine and that's ok with me.

Thanks again.
Don the TR7RV man’s advice is consistently good here. I would use a rust converter on this, then some cold galvanising paint. I then seal the nipples with gaffer tape. Never had a problem subsequently.
You could go for extreme repairs if inclined to do so but unnecessary. RR. :wink2:
 

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Hi Peg,

The cheaper 400 series S/steel
The more expensive 304
The most expensive 316
Mmmm ... I'm not any sort of expert and I don't know the grade of every piece of stainless on my bikes; however, from Dave Middleton's catalogues:-

. most Unified and metric (bought-in) fasteners are 304;

. most bar he sells is free-machining 303; that's also what he makes his Cycle, BSF, etc. fasteners from;

. he also sells 431 as "High Tensile", that's what I use for cylinder head studs and similar.

Some of my bikes have stainless-spoked wheels, at least one for over thirty years, some certainly supplied by Hagon, others possibly by CWC (sourced by the wheel-builder); I've one stainless master cylinder, by Harris afaik (bought from Reg Allen the best part of twenty years ago). Nothing's ever 'rusted' (even when it's spent time near the sea) which was/is the whole point of using stainless for me.

Possibly worth bearing in mind with pattern stainless components prepared without enough care is, if a stainless component is made/finished with tooling also used for 'non-stainless' components, perhaps tiny particles of 'non-stainless' become embedded in the stainless, and it's these particles that rust? Rather like cleaning chrome with a steel wire brush, the latter embedding tiny particles of bare steel in the chrome, that then rust? Just a thought ...

Hth.

Regards,
 
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