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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the things I have noticed as I put my T'Bird into hibernation for the winter, is that the rubber boot covering the rear brake light connector to the master cylinder, together with another of identical appearance covering a connector to the engine block on the same side of the bike, have cracked and split.

They seem to be very thin, flimsy efforts. Has anyone had to replace them and, if so, did you go for stock triumph items or find a more robust alternative?
 

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Same problem....

I tried to get a replacement for the boot on the rear brake switch, but the boot isn't listed as a separate part.

The dealer said I had to order the entire wiring harness to get one! Needless to say, but I'm just gonna let that sucker rot and fall off....

I'll put replacement boots on my list and research some options when I get time.... :wink:

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks chaps.

The whole wiring harness??? Mind you, the rubber boots on my bike's mirrors are also cracked and Jack Lilley told me, with regret, that I would have to buy the whole mirror.

I'll have word with Sprint Manufacturing and see if they have any suggestions. I'll let you know if they can help.
 

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The boot you are talking about is in fine shape on my '95. How and where your bike has been stored can affect the rubber/vinyl parts. Maybe something changed on later models. If the early parts are better (I know the earlier bikes are better/faster/prettier) maybe someone breaking an older bike would sell you just these parts.

Stan
 

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All my rubbery bits are perfect too.. not that that helps you much :) The older stuff does seem to be better.

I read somewhere a while back that storing a bike in a garage or shed which contains garden chemicals can do all kinds of damage to the finish and perishables, especially if there is any dampness in the air. This may of course be complete BS.
 

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The boots on my 04 are split and cracked (Brake switch, mirrors) Anyone with suggestions for replacement or repair (hey -I'll try anything) PLEASE chime in! Maybe equivalent/similar from other manufacturers??
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've talked to Sprint Manufacturing, and they say they will need to source them from bikes they have broken. They are looking out for some.

I think that it may be a case of inferior quality on later models. I am rather obsessive about cleaning and polishing, including the regular use of Autoglym Vinyl & Rubber Care. None of the rubber components on either of the cars has suffered deterioration that I can see (nor on the lawnmowers, which are kept in the gardening tool shed).
 

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Like Stan's, those boots are fine on my 95. As a sidebar to the quality issue, I notice that the black paint on the tanks of new Bonnies in the showroom is vastly inferior to my tank..... very orange-peely. Makes me think that quality has taken a backseat to costs, at least in some areas.
 

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Whilst it is correct that the rear brake switch rubber boot is not listed on the fiche, it *is* available separately. I ordered one last week & expect to receive it soon. The part number is T2500254
Last year I replaced the boot on the oil pressure switch as it had rotted, causing me some degree of alarm when the oil light kept going on & off intermittently as a result of the heavy rain I was riding in, getting to the switch terminals.

Cost of the rear brakeswitch boot was Aus$4.00 plus Aus$9.00 postage.

Regards
Cuppa
 

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Replaced the boots in question on my Legend with genuine Triumph parts. My dealer charged me $1.69 each. I am at work so I don't have the part numbers with me but will look tonight. The rear boot is different from the front but bothcan be replaced with the front boot. The problem with the rear boot is that it won't fit without cutting the wires and inserting the cut ends through the boot hole.
Flybiker :cool:
 

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On 2006-12-06 08:55, flybiker251 wrote:
The problem with the rear boot is that it won't fit without cutting the wires and inserting the cut ends through the boot hole.
Hi Flybiker,
I received my rear brake switch boot (part no. T2500254) in the mail this morning. At first glance it appeared that I would need to cut the wires to get the new boot on, but with a bit of fiddling around with a pair of needlenose pliers I was able to fit it without cutting any wires. The terminals are easy to push out of their plastic connector, & then possible, with a bit of patience, to push each terminal through the entry hole in the rubber boot, & afterwards to put the terminals back into their connector block.
Regards
Cuppa
 

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Further to my post above, I just noticed that the entry point for the wires on the oil pressure switch boot is narrower than the brake switch boot. If you used an oil pressure switch boot on the rear brake switch then you would need to cut the wires to get it on, but as I said, no need to do this if you have the correct brake switch boot.
regards
Cuppa

[ This message was edited by: Cuppa500 on 2006-12-06 17:16 ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Sorry to drag this one back to the fore, but having finally got round to replacing these components, I thought it would be helpful to post the part numbers:

Rear master cylinder brake light switch boot: T2500254 (as per Cuppa500)- £1.12 incl VAT

Front oil pressure switch gaiter: T2500159 - £4.68 incl VAT

Both obtained from Jack Lilley as it happens.

Why the front boot (gaiter) should be so much more expensive than the rear (particularly as it is smaller, but otherwise remarkably similar and just as flimsy) is beyond me.
 

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a little tip

my experience with these is they often split from where the wire goes through. After fitting put a small black cable tie around the boot there and pull it tight - it helps support it and stops any splitting from the cable entry point progressing down further to the boot. this is just from my experiences YMMV. It can also save boots that have a small split already. Obviously its not going to help much against oxidation etc of the rubber it just provides some mechanical help.

[ This message was edited by: MickMaguire on 2007-02-28 15:47 ]
 

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"Sorry to drag this one back to the fore,"

are you kidding- thanks for draggin to the fore.. while we're at it...any PNs for the mirror boots on the tbs??
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the tip, Mick. I'll adopt it.

On 2007-02-28 18:56, rickj wrote:while we're at it...any PNs for the mirror boots on the tbs??
Every UK Triumph dealer I contacted told me that the boots are not available separately from the mirrors - grrr!
 

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The quality of the minor bits and pieces was definitely better on the earlier bikes.

The rubber boots on my TBird are all split and it is only 3 years old with 13,000 miles on the clock. In my spares collection, I have a rear brake boot from a '95 and it is a much more robust and heavier grade of PVC/Rubber.

I had a '95 TBird originally and I think it compared favourably with the later bikes. The unneccessary cost cutting on the later bikes annoys me; things like the 'Thunderbird' badges on the side panels - these were bolt-on metal items on the early bikes, but stick-on plastic on the later ones. Same goes for the little Triumph badges on the frame - rivetted metal versus plastic stick-on.

I know Triumph have to make money on their bikes, but small touches like this do make a difference (well they do to me anyway) to customer perception.
 
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