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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I just purchased a street triple last month as my first bike and am loving it! I couldn't wish for a better bike for me. However, riding now for a month (unfortunately only straight commuting as the weather was still kinda iffy) im still a bit at a loss as to what is the best riding style with the street.

Unfortunately I do not have any biking friends so am looking for some answers here. On my learning bike, a er-5, i usually just counter steered in turns sitting back a bit. On the street that doesn't seem to work as well. Usually all thats nessecary is either push the steer down a bit at higher speeds in conjuction with shifting my weight a little. And simply pushing the tank with my thighs at lower speeds.

Am I on the right track here? My seating position is usually a little back, havent been playing with that much, but on pictures everyone seems to sitting a bit more forward with the torso on the tank.

I guess basically what im asking is whats the best/your riding style for the triple. Kinda like a ss, tour, etc?
 

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One of the great things about a bike like the Street Triple (and most UJM type bikes) is that they are very versatile and can be ridden however the rider decides, and that doesnt have to be just one way either.

I commute daily to work 130 miles and if I rode the bike like a SS, all hunched over and pretzeled, it'd be a pretty uncomfortable ride, so I sit back a bit more, use lazy handlebar steering and just enjoy life.

On the other hand, when I do hit the canyons or twisties, its a simple matter to shift the rear back, the body forward and really hit it hard in the turns. There does seem to be a handlebar right about where I'd like my head to be, but thats the nature of these universal bikes.

In terms of "riding style", as I mentioned, with a bike like this you can make your own. Be safe and enjoy the new purchase.
 

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Riding Style

Reiterating on what was said above, Everyone has there own style, to each his own right,

The street tripple likes to be ridden and behaves like a sportbike, so i guess you would benefit more from that kind of riding style. Leaning into corners, matching RPMs when downshifting.

I think you would benefit alot from the Keith Code books and video(Twist of the Wrist). I dont know if that is relevant here but thats just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input! Like I said, i was just wondering what the 'best' riding style would be with the street triple as i am still discovering mine. I have about 4 months of motorcyle training, including both a road course as well as motorcylce handling (its 2 seperate exams in the Netherlands before getting you license + a theory exam). I dont think more lessons would help, I gues I just need to get road experience and discover my own style. I already have the book twist of the wrist, i just forgot about it :). Definitely going to read that. Would probably help a bit riding the triple as a sportsbike.

Anyway, nice to know there is not one definite style for the bike. A nice reassurance that im not not doing what i am supposed to be doing. And I must say im definitely improving over the last month, going faster through corners than i ever imagined on the er-5. Perhaps some sportcycle training would be good. However, I think ill hold off on that for a while. I think you get more out of that course having had some experience.

Thanks!
 

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If you are new to riding don't try to learn how to do so properly from text whether it be a forum or a book. There are a lot of techniques and terminology that you need to learn and the only proper way is by demonstration. Go take a riding school.
I couldn't agree more. I returned to 2 wheels after many years away and before I even test-rode any bikes, I took the MSF starter course. A lot of it was old-hat, but it was great to revisit all the basics.

After having ridden all winter in ALL weather (other than snow), I am looking forward to signing up for the next MSF course to help hone my skills and un-learn any bad habits ;)

Taking a course has multiple benefits - not only do you learn key skills, but you also get to meet a load of riders and most likely make a few riding buddies while you're at it :)

Even though you state that you've already taken a bunch of courses, it's the training you take after having ridden "out in the wild" for a while that really helps you hone your skills and helps you fix any bad habits or improve specific skills.
 

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I HAVE ridden in snow, and a lot of other places besides. No matter - a safety class every so often is a great refresher and a great attitude adjustment. Every ride is a new learning experience.
 
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