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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys quick question. Is replacing the pads on my TBS a hard job? I have the shop manual for help. Just wondering if this should be my first repair or let my shop do it?
Thanks.
 

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'Tis one of the easier jobs. Just remember the copper grease goes on the back of the pads (the metal bit!) and not on the front (the stoppy bit). Watch out for grease on your hands and make sure everything is clean (pistons/pins etc). Oh, and don't pull hard on the brake lever with no pads in or the pistons will pop out! Not good. Any problems, panic.:D
 

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Just be careful with removing the pins - the recessed allen heads can stick a bit with corrosion.

I tend to use the impact driver straight off (it has the best fitting bits I have too), setting the caliper down on something solid (because of the hammer action) near the wheel to avoid removing hydraulic lines.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the response guys. My bike is in the shop now getting tires. My mechanic is going to flush the brake lines while he's changing out the pads. I'm sure it needs it on a 9 year old bike that I'm sure has sat around. So in other words I chickened out, lol. I am going to change the oil and filter next week. I'll get my hands dirty then. Thanks to everyone for all the help. Next time the pads need changing I'll do it. Thanks again.
 

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Since the shop has broken all the threads loose for you, when you get it back home I would carefully unscrew one at a time, and put just a tiny bit of Never Seize on each. The rear threaded plug that covers the actual pin which unscrews was galled into place on my rear caliper, and took some muscle to remove. Two cautions if you do this: don't get any Never Seize on your pads. It takes just a small amount to work. Second, use a torque wrench on everything. You'll need either the factory manual or the Haynes to get the correct torques, but this is very important, especially if you ever need to tighten those stainless bolts in the future. Stainless is real brittle, and will break easily.
 
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