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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I'm a ham-fisted idiot. Let's establish that upfront OK?

I'm trying to replace the headlight globes in my '06 Daytona and I'm buggered if I can see how to do it...

They have rubber seals (which I can pull back) and then, I'm damned if I can tell how to get the housing out to replace the globes. I don't want to wreck the bike in the process so I've twisted, pulled and poked and all I can see is impending disaster if I start getting heavy handed with them.

There MUST be a secret to them that I can't work out. Can anyone here tell me please?

I don't have a workshop manual so I cannot reference that. If I could, well I wouldn't be such an idiot on a public forum would I?

All help appreciated.

Cheers,
 

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Linz,

I too am ham fisted.

I posted the same question 2 years ago and received no replies. Never did figure it out. I tied a clean lint free rag to a kite strut and used that to clean things up inside the headlight housing through the bulb access in the rear. If you have to replace the reflectors you might be looking at a whole new housing.
You might ask a dealer or good repair shop.
 

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you are kinda out of luck, it is a sealed unit, not ment to be taken apart, but it can be done... on a buddys bike to go some air brushing in side of the light we had to cut the seal in a spot with a razor then use really small hook blade to go all the way around, .. then to put it all back together we used the stuff they put car glass in with ,, it was not a fun job at all. but came out good
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I hate posts that don't come to some conclusion, so here goes.

On my '06 Daytona 955i, there are two access points for the headlight globes, one on either side of the front panel.

The method of removal is first to recognise what you're dealing with. The centre power plug is a stubborn three pin plug which takes some strength and wriggling to remove from the pins on the existing globes (bulbs). Once removed, the rubber seal (which has two finger tabs top and bottom) can be easily removed for access to the seated stock globe (bulb).

A wire retaining clip needs to be released. There's a hook on the right hand side and the clips needs to be lifted inwards, upwards and then back with needle nose pliers. The wire retainer then swings back to the left to give access to the globe (bulb).

The globe (bulb) assembly comes away freely when this is done. Note which way the three pins are facing before removal.

I replaced the stock items with Osram Nightbreakers, a more powerful, slightly bluer light. The Triumph I have takes the H4 model. These are reported to have 90% more light and a slightly bluer light for greater penetration of the road when night riding. I've yet to test it as it's a long weekend, it's double demerit points and the police are thicker than fleas on a dog at the moment. All reports indicate a substantial improvement.

Reinstallation is the opposite of pulling it apart. Take your time and don't get heavy handed. The grip that the three pin plug has on the stockers is amazing. They go back on like a pair of slippers. You'll definitely need needle nose pliers for removing and replacing the retaining clip. A real finger buster.

Well, I did it and my report is above. Who knows at this point whether I achieved anything?

Cheers,

Linz :)
 

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So I'm ham fisted and a dim bulb.. Thought you were trying to access the reflectors not the bulb (globe).

I did the same replacement and it is a big imorovement. Daytona has great lights except for hard turns at night.
 

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So where are the before/after photos???

Hi Linz, I hope that you enjoy your new Nightbreakers. I just posted a new thread, "Philips X-Treme power bulb test". Photos included. Too late for you to do the same as who wants to go through that installation again! I really like my results, and I hope that you are pleased too.

Keep the rubber side down! I'm getting an eyefull of beautiful Melbourne watching the Auzzie tennis open.
 

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I finally got around to figuring this out today, sort of. Took a little reverse engineering, out of sequence. It only took me 4 years.

A factory trained mechanic probably knows The Secret, but they'll never tell. Factory workshop manual is useless for this job.

Remove side plastic in cockpit, 3 allen screws each side.

I had to remove the bulbs before I could disconnect the wiring harness plug from the bulbs. Seems that the wire retaining clip is wedged against the wiring harness plug, with the rubber gasket condom between them.

There also APPEARS to be 2 plastic clips holding the wiring harness plug attached to the bulb. These APPEAR to lock into the holes on the bulb male spade prongs. Or maybe not. Maybe they are just useless appendages? I used a small scribe hook to "unhook" the "tab locks", 2 per bulb. Then pried the bulb from the plug using a flathead screwdriver wedged between them.

Oh yeah, battery disconnected at negative lead, to prevent electrocution. Remove seat first, two allen bolts.

Unhooking the plastic tab locks visible from the cockpit is not required.

My goal for this torture was installing a DPDT switch to cutout the headlights during start, to reduce voltage drain on the battery and computer systems. It will splice into the negative wire on each headlamp, which looks somewhat simple to cut the wire 1/2 inch from the headlamps, and solder 2 black wires to the switch per bulb, plus heat shrink tubing. There's probably a better way to bypass all lights, but that's too complicated for me. I don't want to drill a hole in the plastic, but Im tired of pushing in public. I have a rubber switch cover to waterproof, plus silicon to seal the backside connections.

My starting reliability has been poor, and battery life has been poor. Can't always bump start it when hills are small, using 4th or 5th gear. My cheap trickle charger does not seem to handle long storage, perhaps because Daytona computer system is sucking too many amps even with key off. Which reminds me to go disconnect the big charger before I boil out the water. It raised voltage from 7.2 to 12.7 in 6 hours.

I probably just need to learn how to charge properly, but the headlight cutout switch is more intelligent than the factory setup ordered by Big Brother.


2 tabs hold wiring access cover on harness


Use scribe hook to release 2 lock tabs, but...


This is not required, though it did give grip to arc joint pliers, which also failed to unplug wiring harness


Metal clip is still holding the wiring harness, and possibly lock tabs
 

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Removed bulb before removing wiring harness


Must first release 2 tabs holding wiring harness to bulb using scribe hook then pry apart with flathead screwdriver. Perhaps breaking these plastic tabs will make future replacement easier?


Same problem on right hand side



Have to clean bulbs before re-install or they'll explode, allegedly.

The rubber mount holding the turn signal relay also rotted out, on the left hand side under the plastic. Guess I'll tie wrap it.

Camera is 8 megapixel GE for $80 at amazon. Batteries last about as long as the Triumph.
 

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....
My goal for this torture was installing a DPDT switch to cutout the headlights during start, to reduce voltage drain on the battery and computer systems. ...
Please save yourself the trouble - Triumph already provided this feature for you!
There is already a headlight cut relay that feeds power to the lights - it is a normally closed contact relay that is energized by the starter and flips to the open contact, removing power to the lights.
Of course that only helps for conventional electric starter 'start' will do nothing for bump start

Edit - let me requalify that statement - I now see you have a 600 (the SuperSports forum caters better to the 'little' Daytona)
All of the Triples - Sprints, Daytonas, Speed Triples have this feature - I'd be really surprised if the the 600 didn't also have this capability, but don't know this for certainty

Seems like what you really need to do is get a new battery and get your charging system checked out. Then use a battery maintainer to keep in top condition when not parked for extended periods
 

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Please save yourself the trouble - Triumph already provided this feature for you!
There is already a headlight cut relay that feeds power to the lights - it is a normally closed contact relay that is energized by the starter and flips to the open contact, removing power to the lights.
Of course that only helps for conventional electric starter 'start' will do nothing for bump start

Edit - let me requalify that statement - I now see you have a 600 (the SuperSports forum caters better to the 'little' Daytona)
All of the Triples - Sprints, Daytonas, Speed Triples have this feature - I'd be really surprised if the the 600 didn't also have this capability, but don't know this for certainty

Seems like what you really need to do is get a new battery and get your charging system checked out. Then us a gattery maintainer to keep in top condition when not parked for extended periods
Yes the 600 cuts off headlights, but only when starter switch is depressed. By then voltage has already dropped due to computer self-test and fuel injection priming, as well as all marker lights on even during start.

I've owned a lot of bikes, and this is the only one that didn't have a separate switch for lights, due to govt legislation for "safety". Seems moron drivers cant see 500 pounds of bike, and moron riders cant flip a light switch, according to "genius" govt employees.

I've added vibration damping for the battery, to stop battery cells from shaking loose under bumps, but to add enough damping would require a smaller battery or cutting steel in the the battery box.

A battery should last longer than 2,000 miles.

When the battery refuses to take a charge, then I replace it. This seems to be when a cell plate breaks. Perhaps somebody makes an unbreakable battery? Perhaps an aviation or racecar battery, which are designed to take a beating with extreme vibration.

Part of the problem is I need softer springs, since I only weigh 135 pounds due to kidney disease. Bike appears to be set up for 180 pound riders in USA, which was my former weight. This beats a battery to death.

I'm not saying the Daytona 600 is not a great bike with amazing engineering. I'm saying there's little things that need improving from the factory (bike and manual, ban Pirelli V-twin tires), or modification by owners, and that government bureaurats need to get out of the "safety engineering" business. The same govt that bans use of the word "countersteering" in rider license tests, media "safety" campaigns and factory operator manuals. Same govt that says wearing full safety gear, and knowing your lean angle limit is probable cause for arrest. Same insane govt that bans all motorcycles AND HELMETS from riders younger than 12 AND FROM THEIR PARENTS, and tries to put those dealers and manufacturers out of business during a global Depression, or IN JAIL with a $70,000 fine PER BIKE SOLD (USA 2009).

Edit: Never mind. Thanks for the new thread. I was too lazy to do it.
 

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UPDATE: Headlight on/off switch works good, but requires double-OFF after engine shuts down or some panel lights remain half-on, such as Hi-Beam. Perhaps the off switch prevents a capacitor from discharge?

New battery. Old one had one cell bulging, very low volts, not hold a charge.

1st day with new battery and it ran all day then wouldn't start at 11pm at a gas station. No hill, so had to enlist a pusher. Bump started in 6th, rode home fine, voltage 11.5 with engine off.

So now I'll start testing Voltage Regulator/Rectifier and Stator, with mods to larger-gage wiring. This seems to be a common and expensive defect. A bike should ride longer than 3,000 miles before meltdown.

But I shot some great video of a Goldwing 2-up dragging sparks in every curve of the Dragon, riding from Florida to Alaska to a Caribbean cruise:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reuVgJ5EIGQ&feature=channel_page
 

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Yes, the R1 voltage regulator seems like a wise upgrade costing 20% of what the Triumph part costs.

I knew something was wrong with the electrical design by Triumph, I just underestimated how bad their underestimate was, at 12 midnight 30 miles from home.

BTW, my upgrade to Dunlop from Pirelli was another great move. Now the bike actually steers without "counter-countersteering", as the biker mag reviews reported for the D600. Round tires - what a concept!

Copying the Japs, or Italians, isn't always a good idea. Sometimes you just have to think for yourself.

Guess I'll go measure some volts now, and look for flaming parts.
 
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