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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Repairing or Replacing Neutral Safety Switch

Here is a what I hope will help others on repairing and or replacing their neutral safety switch. Some times it is for leaking and other times for failing. Mine was slightly seeping. I suspect the failures are due to the plastic around the center probe or oil saturation causing a short and can also be repaired. It is a really simple switch. There is my engineering mind going again...
Ok so here goes :
1. If you have a center stand - Jack the bike up and put wood blocks under the front and back wheels. Keep the bike level or slightly lower in the front. Really helps to get the bike up a little to see what you are doing. Not mandatory but sure makes it easier.
2. Drain the oil as you normally would, removing the oil filter is not required but does help for clearance to the neutral switch. Do not refill.
3. Pull electrical lead off the neutral switch. It’s a spade connector and just slides off.
4. Remove the switch with a 14mm deep socket. Slides right on no issues. Torque is light [ 7ft / 84 in lbs torque].
5. Switch drops right down with no oil loss. The copper sealing washer should be on the switch. There it is the little bugger that is giving you grief.
6. Now it’s time to fix that little bastard from leaking ever again. Chip away the hard plastic / epoxy sealer that they used to assemble. Pops right off using a small blade.
7. Roughen the area on both sides of the spade connector. Also with a small jewelers file roughen the steel area all the way around the internals.
8. Clean really well and dry. No it’s ready for the fix.
9. I use 3M epoxy patch – incredible stuff ! Mix it up 50/50 and carefully apply to the entire area around the spade and onto the steel body. Don’t get wild and go too much. You still have to have clearance for the 14mm socket,
10. Put the switch in sun to cure or use a heat gun if you want.
11. While it is curing in the sun it’s time for the copper seal to get some love,
12. I use a small butane torch and heat the seal to anneal it for reuse.
13. Next day look over your repaired switch and it should be ready to add the copper seal washer and reinstall.
14. I used a little [very little] dab of Loclite 592 thread sealant to the threads. I just figured it is good with oils and does a really good job of sealing without locking.
15. Install the switch with the 14mm deep socket to 84 in lb torque.
16. Install the spade connector – which is a little bit of a pain to feel it get back on to the spade blade. Just take your time.
17. That’s it – Install the new oil filter and torque the oil drain plug [216 in / 18 ft lbs] refill the crank case.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
One thing to add : If you use an epoxy like JB weld or something similar that contains metal filler it very well may cause a short from the spade connector to the metal of the switch body. So be aware of that.
 

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Sorry to bring back an old thread. Is there anyway to test this switch? My neutral light never comes on (thus can never leave the bike running with the kickstand down) I need to see if it's the switch or if I need to start looking into the wiring. Thanks!!
 

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Good write up. Be cautious using thread sealants as this switch needs to ground to the crankcase via its body. The copper crush washer should be either replaced with new or annealed (heat with a blow torch until cherry red, then drop into a pot of water to quench...basically rejuvenates the copper so it can crush fully again). This will negate any need for thread sealant.

Furthermore, I believe there was an old thread here about how the switch actuator can become worn to the point it no longer makes good contact with the transmission piece that indicates neutral. If the switch can be torqued a little more tightly, such that is moved further into the casing hole, this can overcome the worn actuator sometimes. Maybe a slimmer sealing washer?
 
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