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OK, I know all about how to fix the flat on a tubes wheel once it's off the bike, but getting the wheel off if out traveling has me baffled. On my old Tiger I'd put it on the center stand and with just the tiniest shifting of weight (i.e. removing or leaving my luggage boxes on) I could have either wheels off the ground for removal. On the Bonnie, NOT. I have it on the center stand and the weight is clearly forward. I put 40lbs of weight in my luggage bags and the front wheel was still firmly on the ground. Had to literally sit on the back to get the front wheel to rise. At home I resorted to a jack under the skid plate, but is there some other trick to getting the front up so the wheel can be removed? Carrying a jack is of course not an option. If I'm with someone else they could sit on the back the whole time but I usually am riding off alone. Help!!!
 

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You're right. This operation can't be done without a jack or a lift. You'd also need a 17mm Allen socket key and some way to drive it, plus other tools. No one carries this stuff when they ride, so road side assistance is about the only option.

I take comfort in the fact that I've never had a flat in all my years of owning and riding many different bikes, all with tube-type tires.
 

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Not as lucky as Tsmgguy here: 3 flats in a year. Maybe Vietnamese roads... two screws, one of which legit’ (*) and a cutter blade.

The 17mm Allen key weighs over a kilo I reckon, but is a necessary addition for a touring toolkit, as they don’t come easy, even a town-sized tyre repair shops.

I have a jack but found the engine bash plate is good enough if you slip logs under to prop up the front wheel, as long as you are careful and don’t load the bike while it’s up.

Ride-on did not save me from the flat, and repair spray gave me some respite from pump to pump to a proper-looking shop.

I often carry a battery-driven air pump on the longer rides, to be used while the engine runs.

I use Fobo TPMS, which have saved my day twice in the three times (not installed until after the first flat on the front wheel).

Aaaah the joys of riding.

No irony here: you couldn’t wipe the smile off my face.

NN

(*) one was sharp at both ends, and found in a high-repair-shop-density area.
 

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@DesertBum Why don’t you go to an Auto Breaker and buy a scissor jack of the sort used in small Hondas and Toyotas? If you’re already packing tyre irons, pump, spare tubes etc it’s not going to add too much extra weight.

The front spindle is easy - use a ‘multi adapter’. These nifty little things have 17,19,22&24 mm hexagon heads and fit pretty much every bike. They’re small, cheap, light and invaluable.



Look on Amazon or EBay for ‘motorcycle front spindle tool’ or similar. Or put this item # into EBAY..
202140363471

Good luck.
 

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It's not often I get a puncture in the front, but went to ride home today, and found the front felt a bit soft.
I still rode it home, and tomorrow morning I'll top up the air and ride it down to the workshop to fix it up.
Now if this had been a tubed wheel, this would probably have done the usual explosive decompression on the way in to work, and there's no way in hell I could have ridden it home.
 

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Thanks @Simon64ds for the hint at the multiadapter: good one to have on hand.

[...]
Now if this had been a tubed wheel, this would probably have done the usual explosive decompression on the way in to work[...]
Not sure about explosive decompression being usual with tubes. All my flats were progressive and slow enough I could manage some km at a time.

Then, I use Fobo tyre TPMS, which give you advance warning.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the input. I DO carry pump etc for fixing a flat now (and have used them on the road, most notably on a freezing, rainy January day in NW Spain while on my Tiger.) However I'm finding with the Bonnie I seem to need a lot more stuff than I did with my Tiger (i.e. removing or at least dropping the silencers so the tool bag keeps getting bigger while my luggage is smaller. But as NN65 says "you couldn’t wipe the smile off my face." :). Longer term converting to tubeless is in the plans (I've done it quite successfully before.)

Thinking along NN65's log solution has got me thinking that maybe taking a tie-down strap would help. I have lots and they don't take much room. It could either be run to a large rock (or log) on the ground behind the bike, or even one of those reusable shopping bags filled with rocks (both plentiful here in Arizona!). Even a luggage bag filled with rocks could work, or possibly to another bike. Possibilities!
 

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I'm just posting in response to @jsobell and his well scrubbed in tires. Nice to see it is being ridden hard. Do you take it to the track?
Well I don't ride it that hard around the city :) Yes, that's left over from Philip Island a few weeks ago.
 
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Thanks @Simon64ds for the hint at the multiadapter: good one to have on hand.
Not sure about explosive decompression being usual with tubes. All my flats were progressive and slow enough I could manage some km at a time.
Then, I use Fobo tyre TPMS, which give you advance warning.
Unfortunately a TPMS does nothing when a tube splits or a valve is sheared off, other than telling you that you have no pressure and that's why the rim is almost on the tarmac.
If you're lucky (?) enough to get a small hole in a tube it will go down gradually, but pretty quickly nonetheless. If the tube splits or the tyre spins and shears the valve off, they go flat in a few seconds. When a nail sticks in the tube it sometimes causes a split like a balloon having a pin stuck in it, as the rubber in tubes is pretty damn thin, and if you look at the tubes in the WC1200 wheels they are surprisingly small and thin (they stretch a long way to fill the void!). With tubeless it generally takes a cut from a sharp piece of metal to cause rapid deflation, and even with the screw yesterday in my tyre it still had about 16psi the next morning.

I hope your luck holds out, but in 33 years of daily riding I've never had a tubed tyre puncture where I've been able to pump it up and ride it to a workshop. With tubeless I've never had a puncture where I couldn't (yet).
 

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Thanks jsobell for the eye opener.

Indeed shearing the valve is a tubed-only experience. I should know, it happened to me on a Tenere a few years ago. Instant flat.

You make a solid point for sealing my rims.
 
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