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Good video, but not quite applicable for our bikes. I mean that part with loosing the spark plugs, then put back all together and starting the engine. I think that it is no need to doing that. It is enough effort just to do the job ones not twice. Besides it is enough carbon deposit
in first five or six treads of spark plug, that can't be blown away anyhow.
But it is good advice if the spark plug is going out hard, to tight it a little, then loose it a little and repeat this until the spark plug is out. And always do this job patient and calm.
 

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Good video, but not quite applicable for our bikes. I mean that part with loosing the spark plugs, then put back all together and starting the engine. I think that it is no need to doing that.
True, on a motorcycle where the plugs are changed a LOT sooner than those on some cars. There wouldn't be as much carbon build up on the plug threads.
But, most of us do drive and work on cars as well, so it's a good little tip! ;)
 

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Sorta agree....

Take this for an idea also:

The legendary Marvel Mystery Oil (Hey they lubed centrifical superchargers on Corvairs with this stuff in the aftermarket in the 60's with a drip feed, no ****....)

Apply several drops around the plug on the top side/highest side for two days, DO NOT RIDE IT or HEAT CYCLE IT/ie crank it.

Then put a slight 1/16 to 1/32 twist clockwise tightening it, repeat the adding of fluid, wait another day.

Then it SHOULD in most cases loosen right out without doing the in and out thing which wears on the aluminum threads a lot more then you think. Galling and stripping of the threads is mostly from lack of anti-seize being applied prior to installation. However if you run into this issue as you remove then, rise and repeat; just don't over stress the plugs or the head by "wiggling" it in and out, which isn't a "wiggle" really; but a bad method. Though it DOES work in a pinch!

Learned this hot-rodding cars years ago and even works on turbo cast iron heads that have "set" the plugs to def-con never to be removed 4....

My 2 cents and it's cheap to do both anti-seize with the new ones (grab a little packet at the check out at the auto parts counter, maybe two packets) and use as directed. And Marvel Mystery Oil is DIRT CHEAP for what all it can do. It's not my ultimate cure all (SOME Lucas Oil/ Amsoil products get that right), but it's up there....

Peace!
 

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For 4.6 liter ford engines, the recommended practice is to run some "Sea Foam".
In the gas tank a few days before you change the plugs. These engines are famous for stripping plug hole threads. Sea foam should wrk in our bikes too.
Gord
 

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Hmm, interesting. Just digging about here I as figure replacing the spark plugs after 9K of my own miles (and potentially 21K total) on them would be an easy upgrade. (I wanna dig in there to check/replace hoses too.)

Do you guys actually follow the method shown in the video? Slightly backing out the plug and 'blowing out' the carbon bits? I 've never heard of this before ... I just dive in like a Neanderthal and back 'em out. Do you use the anti-bonding goop on the threads too? Makes sense.
 

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Great video and trick. I have always wondered why I feel resistance unscrewing those plugs, it's the carbon and that is what will or can strip out the threads.

When re-installing the old plugs, another good thing to do is to take a wire brush and brush off those threads, then always use some copper anti seize. Don't use the aluminum colored stuff, it turns to concrete.
 

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That video has to be the worst example of Bull-sh#ting the torque needed to tighten a plug that I have ever seen!

"lift a five pound weight so you get the feel of it.." WHAT????
That's all good until you find lifting that weight feels nothing like turning a ratchet handle!

To fit a spark plug, first introduce the new plug and tighten using the extension bar by hand only,
That much I do agree with.
But!... you should wind the plug down to the cylinder head by hand, or if its a bit stiff towards the end of the thread, use the ratchet handle, gently until the plug just seats lightly.
Once the plug is gently seated, you should continue tightening, using the ratchet, by 1/4 to 1/2 turn ONLY and then leave it alone, just as directed by the plug manufacturers. That's all you need to compress the crush washers and to give a good seal.
Any anti-seize compound is going to be a help as long as its designed to be used in a high temperature application.
 

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Ummm, I like his watch!

I can change plugs without all that effort. I've never had ANY trouble doing it. Just make sure to change plugs on a cold engine.
 

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I can change plugs without all that effort. I've never had ANY trouble doing it. Just make sure to change plugs on a cold engine.
This may start something, not my intent, but from my own experience. Plugs in aluminum heads come out easier when the engine is hot. My feeling is when hot, the alloy expands more than the steel sparkplug so the hole get's ever so slightly larger thereby easing it's grip on the plug just a bit. Never stripped a plug hole in any alloy head using this hot method. Including anything from lawnmowers, to my original Norton, to a really overdo 5.3 liter Sierra V8.
 
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