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Discussion Starter #1
Would someone kindly point me to an existing thread covering this topic or describe the basic process - in very simple steps - to someone of limited technical knowledge. Tried a forum search but didn't find the answer.
 

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You will need a bike stand that will allow the rear tire to be remove to the right of the bike.

You will need a trusty 46mm socket and a decent breaker bar.

You will need a torque wrench capable of 108 FT-LBs

1) Remove the Nut Locking clip (you can do this by hand)

2) Before lifting the rear of the bike, with the bike in gear or the rear brake on and bike stable, break the rear wheel nut torque

3) Raise the rear on your stand and finish removing the Nut and all the stuff in the picture below

4) Carefully rotate the tire away from the hub. Not sure if you have low mount exhaust, this may get in the way

5) Repeat the process in reverse order to put it back on.

6) Torque to 108 FT-LB's (146Nm)

7) If the holes for the Clip do not line up I always turn in the tighten direction until they do. That is just how I do it. Not sure what the official Triumph procedure is for that.

Here is the section from the factory service manual

Hope it helps
 

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I had the verniers on that nut today, bigger than anything in my collection, so will have to add to my xmas list.
 

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I ordered my socket from Northern Tool. It was 3/4" drive too so keep that in mind if you don't have a big enough driver for it. It really only takes like 5 minutes. I also don't have a rear stand so for me I just used a floor jack under the linkage and it works great.
 

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Take care when pulling the MASSIVE socket away from the 46mm nut. If your ratchet drive/extender does not have a strong depent-ball on it it can easily pull off the drive/extender and fall and dent your beautiful rim. Or break your foot!!

I know! That was the very first rookie mistake I made with my S3. I had my stock rear tire for about 3 weeks before it was thrashed and was replacing it. Off it went and BANG into the rim. Not one dent but two!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for the clear, step by step instructions. Really appreciate you taking the time to guide me towards being able to undertake the task - without fear of unwittingly doing expensive damage.
 

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I prefer to support the bike on a stand that picks the bike up by the steering neck

Remove the calipers and put them back out of the way .
I usually put them back on top of the rad secured with a bungee strap so they do not fall off and smack anything .

Loose the pinch bolts and remove the axle , I have made a tool for supporting the wheel so it does not just fall out . Take note of the axle spacers and how they seat in the wheel .

On re assembly put the axle in finger tight and lower the bike off the stand. jounce the forks a few times , this helps get everything straight, Torque the axle , then pinch bolts and restore the calipers .
 

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Very timely thread as I'm awaiting new Pilot Road 3's to have mounted and need to remove both wheels. I need to purchase the 22mm hex for the front, and 46mm for the rear this week and I should be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bizarre place is the interwebby - here we have people from Britain, Canada, the USA and New Zealand all talking and learning in a positive fashion and to a common purpose.
 

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Bizarre place is the interwebby - here we have people from Britain, Canada, the USA and New Zealand all talking and learning in a positive fashion and to a common purpose.
Just do not ask what the best oil to is to run in your bike and the collective world of S3 owners will all get along just fine!!!
 

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Bizarre place is the interwebby - here we have people from Britain, Canada, the USA and New Zealand all talking and learning in a positive fashion and to a common purpose.
Oh no, you're still a hubcap-stealing, flat cap wearing, whippet-owning northern monkey :D

Seriously, though, nobody mentioned that a 1 13/16" socket is identical to 46mm, some people have saved money by buying the potentially more readily-available Imperial socket (here in the US, at least).

Also, I'd recommend that you cover the open end of the socket with masking tape to avoid scratching the soft aluminium conical washer.

Cheers!
 

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I don't have one of those fancy stands. I used a small block and chain hoist and two short nylon lifting strops (off ebay) on my previous bikes. That works pretty well, but I can only lift one end at a time. the rafter wouldn't support the whole bike.

I note the manual (still reading) says for abs bikes, not to mix front / rear fitments, so if you change brands (usually the rear) then you have to replace the front too. Is this correct?

In the past I have ordered specialised sockets (like torx sockets) from sears now that they ship internationally, even with freight they were cheaper than buying them locally, so I will check them out.
 
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