Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am restoring a 76 T140V and was having a bit of trouble getting the gasket residue off of the engine casing. Well, I took a dremel and sanded the residue off without eating into the metal at all! The pieces look like new now and should be able to have a great seal. Dremels can do amazing things!


IMG_8932 by eamann665, on Flickr


IMG_8931 by eamann665, on Flickr

Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
I would be concerned that the dremel tool would make the surface uneven.

I safer way would be to lay a sheet of very fine wet and dry on a flat surface and rub it down gently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wet or dry is a type of sandpaper. Yes I thought that may be an issue but it is not actually sandpaper but a finer type of wheel that is similar to something you would use to strip paint. the surfaces are actually very flat as I have tested it on a piece of glass. It works very well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
425 Posts
A dead flat surface, plate glass is ok, emory paper, and some kerosene. I use 3M 77 to stick the emory onto a Blanchard ground plate. Less likely to get tears in the paper. Kero will keep the emory from loading up, excellent cutting fluid for alu. Use even pressure and a figure 8 motion when possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
I use elbow grease and Methylated Spirits (or Denatured alcohol), which I find is especially good at getting off the older type gasket compound such as Red Hermetite. I'd be very wary of using power tools such as a Dremel, fearing that the integrity of the surface becomes even more compromised - particularly on vintage classics -- and thereby creating more opportunity for oil leakage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
After using a scraper to get the easiest parts off, I use Permetex gasket remover. It works really great on those hard to get at remaining tidbits and reduces the chances of gouging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
I have not seen that product on the shelves over here. It sounds excellent. I must check to see whether in fact it is available...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I have not seen any difference between the brands, they should all work ok. Has anyone tried oven cleaner? I have used it to remove clear paint from aluminum parts but have never tried it on gaskets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,515 Posts
I have not seen any difference between the brands, they should all work ok. Has anyone tried oven cleaner? I have used it to remove clear paint from aluminum parts but have never tried it on gaskets.
I would use paint stripper and/or oven cleaner subject to it not being caustic soda based. Caustic soda will eat at aluminium and one would need to be very careful when using such a products.

As a bye the bye; owners use paint stripper to remove clear lacquer that has been sprayed over polished alloy. So if you want to clear lacquer your polished bits, this is how to remove it when it yellows.

I do prefer the method proposed by Buckshot. Wet and dry carborundum paper, with about 120/240 grit, on glass. I also think the Dremel may leave you with an uneven surface.

I know the Dremel is the tool of choice in the US, and I one day hope to own one for myself (I'll need to save some a little money from each pension payment), but I would not use it for this purpose. RR
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top