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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been corresponding with Dick on his AI solenoid removal and will shortly be going in to remove that stuff. Perhaps the biggest deal with removing the AI is getting the tank off. My question to those that have removed their fuel tank on the EFI bike...were you able to get the fuel line connection apart by pivoting the tank up in back keep the front bolts in loose? Anybody know if the fuel line disconnect is the same for carbed and EFI bikes? Dick actually rotates his tank 90 degrees laterally to the side like a football rotates and not front to back because of limited clearance to the front of the tank. Dick's method of course creates more room but at higher risk to damaging the tank as it is lifted right off the bike. On other motorbikes, I have always disconnected stuff by rotating the tank up in back..not much room with this approach but able to get in there...propping up the tank in back a couple of inches with a little scrap of wood.
Thanks for any suggestions. Trying to figure out the safest yet effective technique if doing the job solo.
George
 

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The carb bikes use an 8mm rubber hose slipped over a barb on the petcock outlet.

Dick
 

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tanks for the memories!

I removed mine for the very reason you are going to. I rotated it to the side and back a bit, was very careful not to bang it on anything. Also helps if it is empty (I thought the disconnect would leak so I drained it first.) I had a little trouble getting the disconnect to let go but finally got it. One thing I learned: either leave the valve attached with it's electrical connector attached and just remove the hoses or have a low resistance resistor (100 ohm or so) to jump the connector. If you go the resistor route, remember to do it BEFORE you turn the key for the first time. Failing to do so will cause the 'check engine' light to come on and stay on. Don't ask how I know...I used the resistor method since I already had the valve off and disconnected. A bizzare side note: the tech who re-set my check engine light was killed in a very odd motorcycle accident about a week later. He went off the deep end, broke into the dealership, took a brand new BMW and then crashed it at high speed a few miles away. Some think it was suicide.
 

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I removed mine for the very reason you are going to. I rotated it to the side and back a bit, was very careful not to bang it on anything. Also helps if it is empty (I thought the disconnect would leak so I drained it first.) quote]

It won't leak, but a low fuel load is quite helpful as the difference betwen empty and full is a 24 # delta.

Dick
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I rode the gas down in my tank last night so I could remove it. Good to know these tanks don't leak much when moving them around.

McRuss...sounds like you rotate your tank sideways for access under the same as Dick does it. How do you hold the tank up on its side and then remove the connector? Do you rest the side of the tank on the frame of the bike while you undo the fuel line fitting? Seems to me there aren't enough hands to hold up the tank off the frame and then undo the stuff underneath.

Can somebody add a further explanation how to get the fuel fitting apart? I saw the picture that Dick posted and read his brief discription but it isn't clear to me. Do you have push the fuel line into the nipple to reduce preload so the little C shaped bracket that holds the two together can be slipped laterally off to the side?

Thanks,
George
PS: McRuss...sorry to hear about the tech at your dealer. Both an amazing and quite a sad story.
 

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I am about to remove my fuel tank to do a valve cover swap so I am not sure who will be first Biker7. If I am I will put my experience here re getting the fuel line to release. Hope you will do the same. I am a bit puzzled about that myself. The electric connection for fuel pump should just clip off and I'm hoping the vent hose will just pull off. And I will remember to create a "nest" for the tank BEFORE I am standing there with it in my hands and a dumb look on my face wondering where to put it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Some words about the fuel line quick disconnect Richard as we go in....
See the pic below that Dick took.
Here are the words he used to describe how to disconnect this union:
You need to lift it some and then slide it longitudally to get the lock clear of the quick disconnect.

My take away here...I placed an arrow next to the raised edge that I believe is the area of the orange clasp Dick means "to lift".
I believe the C shaped orange clasp is pure redundancy...don't believe it is the principle fastener for keeping the fuel line union together.
In other words...it is a standard quick connect high pressure fuel line cylindrical fitting which is safety locked with the clasp. My sense is the clasp needs to be dislodged laterally by the rearward edge shown by the arrow i.e. 90 deg. to the fuel line nipple. This will peel the forked end off the cylindrical quick connect fitting and then the clasp can be pushed longitudnally out of the way after laterally clear from the union into the position shown in the picture.

I presume from there the disconnect is typical i.e. you slide the outboard cylinder longitudnally relative to the fitting to get the connection apart...similar to high pressure air hose.

I will confim this and update this thread when I remove the tank.
George

 

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Looks pretty straight forward and will probably make more sense once I get a look under my tank and see what the orange snap lock looks like in the closed position. It helps to see it open like that. I will have some pieces of wood handy to prop things while I get under the tank. Thanks George and Dick.

The electrical connection looks like a simple "press here" and pull type?

Hopefully I will be working on mine this evening... after the garden chores are done and grass is cut before we get a promised three days of rain.
 

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George;

First lift "up" on the orange safety clip, that is, move the centerline away from the longitudnal axis of the steel fuel line. Then, one leg at a time, move the legs of the safety clip "aft", or way from the rubber line. You'll need to slighty spread each leg of the clip one at a time to do this. Once the orange clip is free (as shown in the pic) you depress the two opposing fingers on the quick disconnect and voila - it is free. This is much tougher to desribe in writing than it is to accomplish. :)

I think it might be easiest to stand on the right side and roll the tank 90* to the right and aft slightly.

Dick
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Dick for the further clarification...helps a lot.

Richard, please be sure to update this thread with what you learn when you go in. I won't be working on mine until Sunday at least.

Farm house kitchen electrical demands. :eek:

I appreciate the help on this.
George
 

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Thanks Dick for the further clarification...helps a lot.

Richard, please be sure to update this thread with what you learn when you go in. I won't be working on mine until Sunday at least.

Farm house kitchen electrical demands. :eek:

I appreciate the help on this.
George

Thanks Dick from me as well. Will post later.
R
 

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Successful Operation

I obviously can work on motorcycles better than I can handle computer disks. (Inside joke for Biker7).

Dick's method is about the only way to get the gas line off if you are doing it single handedly. A second pair of hands to hold the tank would be ideal, but not necessary.
I pulled the tank back slightly after taking out the two rear bolts and propped it up about five inches from the frame at the back of the tank using a small board on its side. That gave me enough clearance to easily disconnect the quick release electrical connection on the left side and pull off the vent hose on the right. Now the fun part. Dick is right, about the only way to get at the gas hose disconnect is to stand on the right side of the bike...make sure you are wearing a non-scratching (no buttons or zippers) sweat shirt or something similar and roll the tank carefully towards you. I left the rear of the tank notched into the frame for some support and stability. Then with one arm holding the tank use your other hand to undo the orange retainer clip and disconnect the hose. As Dick says you have to rotate the clip about 45 degrees laterally and lift it slightly. You then have to lever it backwards unhooking one leg of the c-part at a time. Once it is clear of the connector, squeeze the little rectangular buttons on each side of the connector and it will release and slide off the tank nozzle. There will be a small bit of fuel spilled from the hose, so have a rag handy. Now place the tank in its prepared nest. It is best to do this when the tank is fairly empty...a full tank would be a handful.

I plan a DIY pictorial on tank removal and a cam cover change. But I need a good sleep first.

Let us know how you make out George.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
This thread is really informative thanks to Dick and yourself Richard. Many thanks. Will help me a lot when I go in and remove the AI in the next couple of days. Really surprising that the quick disconnect cannot be accessed with raising the rear of the tank by 5 inches but believe you. I do like the idea of propping up the rear of the tank to disconect the electrical connector and vent tube to minimize time and effort when jockeying the tank with the fuel line disconnect as those electrical connectors can be real buggers and takes two hands many times so a big help there.
Sounds as though the fuel line orange clasp and quick connect can be taken apart with the left hand while the right arm cradles the tank while standing on the right hand side of the bike. Makes sense.

I look forward to your write up Richard and a great addition to the DIY for reference to all future EFI owners.
Cheers,
George
 
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