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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Earlier I was toying with the idea of removing/replacing my airbox covers. I took one off (left side) to find something very upsetting. The airbox plastic was cracked in several places, definitely due to over-tightening the bolts. It's leaking, because the front/back are no longer held together tightly (result of the cracked plastic). Some sort of guerilla glue has been applied to certain areas.

I have heard many people mention removing the airbox, and I've seen lots of pictures with those exposed filters in it's place. I don't want to get in over my head. I'm basically looking for a rough cost to do this myself, and to know what kind of modifications/tuning are involved. If this is too much for me to take on, I will probably leave it alone for the time being.
 

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Before you start playing around with the airbox, take a look at the "proven settings" stickey.

Once you start messing with the airbox, you will have to rejet the carbs.
 

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If you do not have any experience swapping jets in Motorcycle Carbs, I'd leave that alone until you get some more experience.

I've done it and I still don't like to mess with it.
You need to keep good records, and you need to change only one thing at a time. So removing the Carbs several times is the usual procedure, to get the jetting figured out.

Unfortunately you can't always depend on someone else's known good setup because every bike is a little different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
At this point I probably will leave it alone, I'm just bummed that I bought a used bike that has been tampered with and "fixed". There's clearly oil leaking out of the airbox, black gunk over all items below it. The plastic parts where the screws thread in are cracked on both sides. I just hope this isn't doing harm to my bike.
 

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Triumph sells the entire airbox as a maintenance item.
That's right, they don't sell just the filter.
It's about $60.00 US.
The oil you're seeing is kinda normal since the crankcase vents into the airbox.
 

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Airbox/Oil

At this point I probably will leave it alone, I'm just bummed that I bought a used bike that has been tampered with and "fixed". There's clearly oil leaking out of the airbox, black gunk over all items below it. The plastic parts where the screws thread in are cracked on both sides. I just hope this isn't doing harm to my bike.
There is a drain hose that exits the rear of the airbox. The hose generally runs down adjacent to and in front of the rear shock. Sometimes (factory fitted) there is a plug inserted at the end of the hose. If there is, remove it and the airbox will drain over time with the bike on the side stand.
If there is excessive oil in the box then the (air) filter will be contaminated. You then have a choice, buy the entire airbox off a Triumph Dealer for huge cost or replace the filter element with a K & N one. The latter allows regular cleaning and re-oiling.
As for the cracked parts, bog them up with an epoxy filler, with the screws in place, making
 

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There is a drain hose that exits the rear of the airbox. The hose generally runs down adjacent to and in front of the rear shock. Sometimes (factory fitted) there is a plug inserted at the end of the hose. If there is, remove it and the airbox will drain over time with the bike on the side stand.
If there is excessive oil in the box then the (air) filter will be contaminated. You then have a choice, buy the entire airbox off a Triumph Dealer for huge cost or replace the filter element with a K & N one. The latter allows regular cleaning and re-oiling.
As for the cracked parts, bog them up with an epoxy filler, with the screws in place, making
Beastman, make sure that drain hose isn't the one that you "capped off".
 

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There is a drain hose that exits the rear of the airbox. The hose generally runs down adjacent to and in front of the rear shock. Sometimes (factory fitted) there is a plug inserted at the end of the hose. If there is, remove it and the airbox will drain over time with the bike on the side stand.
Hang on... that plug has purpose dont throw it out.

The plug should stay there but be removed periodically to check for oil build up. You shouldn't get more an a teaspoon or so between checks but if you start getting a lot it is an indication that the centrifugal breather and or its seal needs replacement.

the disadvantages of leaving the plug out are that you can pull in some unfiltered potentially dirty air (which will be bypassing the airfilter), you may find drips of oil when you move your bike (like Triumphs of old) and you wont necessarily notice as quickly when your breather starts to fail

your choice :D
 

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Beastman, make sure that drain hose isn't the one that you "capped off".
see reply above but the airbox drain should remain capped off. If there is a significant build up of oil the breather and seal need service.
 

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No need to 'hang on'

Hang on... that plug has purpose dont throw it out.

The plug should stay there but be removed periodically to check for oil build up. You shouldn't get more an a teaspoon or so between checks but if you start getting a lot it is an indication that the centrifugal breather and or its seal needs replacement.

the disadvantages of leaving the plug out are that you can pull in some unfiltered potentially dirty air (which will be bypassing the airfilter), you may find drips of oil when you move your bike (like Triumphs of old) and you wont necessarily notice as quickly when your breather starts to fail

your choice :D
Nowhere in the reply did I suggest the the the plug not be re-placed or even thrown away! Was it necessary to say 'replace the plug after the oil has drained out'?
If the guy was asking advice on handlebar removal, would it then be necessary, after helping him out, to add 'make sure you replace them before riding the scoot' !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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At this point I probably will leave it alone, I'm just bummed that I bought a used bike that has been tampered with and "fixed". There's clearly oil leaking out of the airbox, black gunk over all items below it. The plastic parts where the screws thread in are cracked on both sides. I just hope this isn't doing harm to my bike.
Some how last reply got shortened. We repaired an airbox displaying symptoms of yours by using a two pack epoxy resin type adhesive. Remove the airbox from the bike and examine all threaded fittings, where they are cracked clean up with acetone or similar, place the screws into the threads and apply the mixed resin in the cracks making sure none touches the actual screws. Do each fitting separatly and use vice grips or similar to hold the repair together overnight. With time and patience we managed to repair all (and I mean the lot) of the fittings that hold the two halves of the airbox together along with the fittings to which the side covers attach. Cheap and effective repair.
Also, for what it is worth, replaced both the centrifugal oil thrower and seal according to instructions. An expensive business! Still had excess oil entering airbox. Re-routed the breather hose via a new drilling into the secondary airbox. The hose then enters a clear plastic container secured to the base of the box. The container has a drilling for the hose to enter and has a foam pad in it. Another drilling allows the breathing cycle to be completed and clean air ex. the crankcase is drawn back into the combustion chambers.
At each oil change I clean and re-oil the foam pad.
Pluses, no more oil leaks from airbox and clean filtered air from the breathing system entering the intakes.
 

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Nowhere in the reply did I suggest the the the plug not be re-placed or even thrown away!
Sorry 'cuba that was how I took the meaning on this sentence:

If there is, remove it and the airbox will drain over time with the bike on the side stand.
I can see that it could be read both ways now.... guess its down to how much time is "over time" :D
 

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the disadvantages of leaving the plug out are that you can pull in some unfiltered potentially dirty air (which will be bypassing the airfilter),
Is this why my bike is running lean?? I just noticed the cap was missing on my bike and I wonder how long it has been off. Perhaps the dealer removed it so the bike could breath easier???
 

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Is this why my bike is running lean?? I just noticed the cap was missing on my bike and I wonder how long it has been off. Perhaps the dealer removed it so the bike could breath easier???
i doubt it would make a huge difference to running, though it would make a small amount
 
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