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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've just removed andf refitted my T100's real wheel after changing a worn out tyre (got a puncture waiting for the money to buy a new one).

Ten minutes to remove the wheel and couple of hours to refit:

lifting the wheel into place while trying to keep the flop out spacers on both sides of the wheel in place while lining up the four holes on the two chain adjusters and fitting the washer between the right adjuster and the right flop out spacer while pushing (soft headed hammer) the axle spindle through the lot. (Crow bars, wooden blocks and a large screwdriver utilised).

What a nightmare! Am I missing something? Is there a way to do this job that's simpler than me? Or is this a classic example of a badly designed piece of machinery being suffered by owners and ignored/unrecognised by the manufacturer year after year? Does this show the practical limlts of rampant modern British wishey washey liberalism and form the basis for bringing back capital punishment for the c**t/s who designed this engineering horror?

I have apologised to the woman next door for my basic Anglo-Saxon phraseology.
 

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Yes, it's not the most pleasant of tasks, involving those 3 spacers (including the one between sprocket carrier and hub), chain adjusters, rubber lumpy bits in the cush drive, etc. Three hands would be useful to have.

It's made a bit easier if the rear wheel is supported by a small scissor jack to enable accurate positioning to insert the axle but the crucial bit is that it appears as if the swing arm is not wide enough and leverage has to be applied to stretch it a little bit.

Can't seem to find that bit of the procedure in the Factory manual though.
 

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I usually support the wheel on a piece of wood that allows the wheel centre to align with spindle, then you can just jiggle into place, sometimes removing the rear brake pads helps as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
It doesn't help that the rubber cush only goes right back in place when you tighten the axle nut, so that there's no room to play with when trying to line everything up (no matter how much you whack it with a soft headed hammer or stand on it). The assembly needs a better design: spacers that stay put and a right hand adjuster that doesn't snag on the wheel's right spacer when you're trying to wiggle the wheel and attachments into place.

Realistically it's a two and a half man (six hands) job. I got so frustrated I nearly kicked the bike over and walked away.
 

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I've just removed andf refitted my T100's real wheel after changing a worn out tyre (got a puncture waiting for the money to buy a new one).

Ten minutes to remove the wheel and couple of hours to refit:

lifting the wheel into place while trying to keep the flop out spacers on both sides of the wheel in place while lining up the four holes on the two chain adjusters and fitting the washer between the right adjuster and the right flop out spacer while pushing (soft headed hammer) the axle spindle through the lot. (Crow bars, wooden blocks and a large screwdriver utilised).

What a nightmare! Am I missing something? Is there a way to do this job that's simpler than me? Or is this a classic example of a badly designed piece of machinery being suffered by owners and ignored/unrecognised by the manufacturer year after year? Does this show the practical limlts of rampant modern British wishey washey liberalism and form the basis for bringing back capital punishment for the c**t/s who designed this engineering horror?

I have apologised to the woman next door for my basic Anglo-Saxon phraseology.
My method is to lower the bike lift just enough to roll the wheel in after it has cleared the rear mudguard. I place the left chain adjuster over the swing arm end and push the spindle through that and the spacer. The spindle just hangs there without protruding through on the inside. Then in goes the wheel and the spindle is pushed through but again not enough to come through the other side. Then the right spacer and chain adjuster are squeezed in and the spindle pushed all the way through. It doesn't matter if the chain adjusters have dropped down while doing all this because they can be positioned after the spindle is through.
 

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I usually support the wheel on a piece of wood that allows the wheel centre to align with spindle, then you can just jiggle into place, sometimes removing the rear brake pads helps as well.
If you do the job by the book, you'll have removed the rear caliper before removing the wheel anyway. Removing the right hand chain adjuster gives you more room to work with. Get the spindle back in most of the way to support the wheel and then slide the adjuster back in before fully locating the spindle. Using some grease can help too. Makes the job a lot easier. I can do the job unaided now and pretty quickly, but yes, the first time involved much sweat, time and foul language.
 

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I also support the wheel and/or adjust the bike on the lift so the wheel sits at the correct height relative to the swingarm. I insert a long ratchet extension from the right to more or less hold everything in place (anything that fits will work: a piece of dowel, a piece of narrow pipe or rigid tubing, etc.). Then I insert the spindle from the left, pushing out the place holder as it goes.

After you've done this a few times, it's not difficult. Make sure that you put the spacers back correctly, or you'll be pulling it apart and doing it again.
 

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I also support the wheel and/or adjust the bike on the lift so the wheel sits at the correct height relative to the swingarm. I insert a long ratchet extension from the right to more or less hold everything in place (anything that fits will work: a piece of dowel, a piece of narrow pipe or rigid tubing, etc.). Then I insert the spindle from the left, pushing out the place holder as it goes.

After you've done this a few times, it's not difficult. Make sure that you put the spacers back correctly, or you'll be pulling it apart and doing it again.
It took me a couple of tries to figure this out but it is great advice! Long ratchet extension from the right to hold the pieces in line then drive it out with the axle from the left.
 

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Thank you

Good post jimbon,

My rear tire has something in it and I'm going to replace it in the next few days. This post and the replies have come when I needed the info most.

Thanks everyone for your input,
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I like the idea of holding bits in place on the right side with a rachet extension while fitting the axle spindle from the left.

I've also thought of lubricating the rubbers of the cush drive with ACF 50 to ease this further back into the hub, which would alleviate much of the problem without too much bashing. I think this would be OK: probably help keep out water and keep the rubbers supple?

Thanks boys, I feel more relaxed on this Sunday morning. The sun's shining and I think I'll go for a ride.
 

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Changed the rear tyre recently. Also had a fair struggle refitting the wheel until I supported it with a piece of wood.
 

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I take the axel with some spacers while the wheel is off and tighten the sprocket carrier up with the axel. It hard to get the rubber cushion to seat good with out clamping it together with the axel first. This will allow the wheel to slide in easy.Also it helps to remove the rear fender and have the bike the right height to roll the wheel in rather than having to lift the wheel up. I always remove the brake caliper.
 

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As dickjanewats says pull the sprocket carrier back into the wheel with spacers and the axel then tie the sprocket to the spokes cable ties this eliminates the carrier working out the two spacers should stay in with grease and make sure you have removed the caliper from the mounting bracket, Feed the axel through the Lft hand swinging arm and caliper bracket wheel into place with the spacers (never had the spacers drop out as the seals and grease hold them ) up on a block of wood and side axel through when done cut the cable ties (have found if the bike is new or never had the wheel out the rubbers can push the sprocket carrier out as much as 1/2") Replace caliper.
T.U.D.
 

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Check for bearing failure while at it

A word to the wise at rear-tire replacement time:
Look for signs of bearing failure in the cush drive. My 2008 Bonnie had bearings flattened like spaghetti noodles in there. I'm told that it's rare but it's worth having a look during each tire change. Ask your tire shop/dealer to have a look if they're doing the removal/replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I take the axel with some spacers while the wheel is off and tighten the sprocket carrier up with the axel. It hard to get the rubber cushion to seat good with out clamping it together with the axel first. This will allow the wheel to slide in easy.
Nice.
 
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