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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I've just adjusted the chain on my '02 and it appears that the adjusters for rear wheel are locked together by the axle and "clips" so that they turn the same amount when you move either one. Now, naturally, the owner's manual shows using two Allen keys to do the procedure to align the marks, but they only provide one in the kit. I've done this before and checked the alignment with the string method and all was well, but....am I missing something in the "translation" and is there a way of moving each adjuster independently?

The "village idiot" is wondering, that's all: Jim
 

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I agree that the two sides move together, but not exactly. There is still some "play" in the connection. I get the chain adjusted first. Then adjust the alignment by measuring the tire to the swing arms.
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply, Mark; I'll check it with the strings before the week is out, hopefully. I did try to move the brake side with the Allen key after I tightened up the sprocket side, but it seemed tight as a drum, and I wasn't about to put a piece of pipe on it to force it. Sure hope the strings tell me good news...they did the last time I did the adjustment.

Again, thanks for the get-back: Jim
 

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If you loosen the rear axle, you can move the adjusters independently. If I remember right, the allen key is size 12. You can get a socket from ebay cheaply.
 

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Hey Jim,
Whereabouts in Mass. are you located? What kind of Trophy do you have. The reason I ask is, I have seen a Blue Trophy up here on my way to work up here in Ipswich. This morning was the second time I've seen it. It's a blue Trophy with full bags including top-box, and has a blue tinted sport screen. Is that you?? -Warren-
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi, Gamsa,
Thanks for that info....I kinda thought that was the way to go if needed. Sockets?? Tools??? I owned an MGB back in the "good old days" and 4 of the old Triumph bikes and a BMW R75/6 (along with other makes) so tools are NO PROBLEM. It's just that as I'm growing older, I'm looking for the easiest way out (got my first Social Security check last week, if you catch my drift).

The "Village Idiot" tires easier these days: Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi, Medic,

I live outside of Worcester, in Central MA. Mine is Emerald Green (the fastest color) and you can usually find me and it at Moto Market in Acton, MA on the weekends. If you haven't been there, it's worth a ride up; coffees, teas, cold drinks (non-alcoholic), pastries and accessories along with great conversation. What else does one need?

Hope to meet you there someday: Jim
 

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You need a set of metric allen sockets and a torque wrench capable of putting out axle torques 80Nm ish - I can look this up if you want the Haynes torque for the axle. You only need to loosen the axle from the right hand side; the left side forms part of the axle itself and won't turn in a hurry, especially if it's taking the weight of the wheel. That's about it. Let me know if you hit any problems, but with that weight of experience behind you, this should be a doddle.
 

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You need a set of metric allen sockets and a torque wrench capable of putting out axle torques 80Nm ish - I can look this up if you want the Haynes torque for the axle. You only need to loosen the axle from the right hand side; the left side forms part of the axle itself and won't turn in a hurry, especially if it's taking the weight of the wheel. That's about it. Let me know if you hit any problems, but with that weight of experience behind you, this should be a doddle.
My Trophy has hexbolt heads on both sides (19mm socket). What you can also do is look to see where the alignment marks are. There are little tick marks along the bottom edge of the swingarm at the eccentric disc. The disc also has a tick mark. Just count how many marks you are at and your alignment should be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi All,

Checked it with the "magical" strings and the alignment looks real good. I guess that the dealer did a good job of checking it when they did the new tires. Just gotta wonder why they like to put the chain so snug. By the way, just for the future, how do you remove the "clip" that locks the head of the bolt/nut....pry it out?

Thanks again for all the help: Jim
 

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Just squeezed two bare ends with a pair of pliers. Where did you run strings to? The only way I've ever managed to get reliable measurements is to run old fluorescent tubes along edges of front and rear wheel with handlebars straight. Even small differences are pretty bad news.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi Gamsa,

I tape a long string around the back of the rear tire and run it up each side of the bike to a couple of pieces of wood with a nail in each to wrap the string ends around; then, I put some weight on them (a brick). I move the blocks/strings so that the strings JUST touch the rear tire, front and back edges, on both sides. Now I just go up front, straighten the wheel and make sure that the clearances are equal on both sides of the front tire at the front and rear edges on both sides. You can use a ruler to measure the 4 points, but "eyeballing" them is more than enough. You could probably go out of your mind using a ruler as I believe that there are subtle differences in the tires and rims over their circumferences, hence, a good hard look has always worked for me. Just make sure that the strings clear the center-stand, that's all.

Not much different than your "straightedge" method, actually, which is probably easier: Jim
 
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