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Cheers. Aesthetically they do look on point as well.


What's the height adjustment range?

The main reason for lowing mine was to get both feet on the floor. Can't say I prefer the handling one way or the other...it's just different, a bit lazy and more cruiser.

I'm in the UK so may drop Hagon a line.
 

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Cheers. Aesthetically they do look on point as well.


What's the height adjustment range?

The main reason for lowing mine was to get both feet on the floor. Can't say I prefer the handling one way or the other...it's just different, a bit lazy and more cruiser.

I'm in the UK so may drop Hagon a line.
Are you lowering the front spring too. Delboy has good videos for lowering front and back.

 

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Are you lowering the front spring too.
No. I'm pretty short on time at the moment. I know leaving the front at stock slows the steering, but I ran it for a year or so and didn't find it so noticeable that it required further mods - as I said just a different feel. That said I wonder if I should find out from Hagon if there is an in between - i.e. +10mm over the stock bonnie /

I remember that vid! Amazing how much their channel has progressed. Loved the foxdawg build and can't wait for the 'busa café.

(Note to self, because I always forget... stock scrambler = 360mm stock bonnie = 340mm)
 

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Hugo7

Hagon can set you up with the height you specify. Lowering the back (say from 360 to 350 mm) slows turn in a bit. Increasing, as I did accelerates it. New tires will also change things as the profile will be rounder, while old tires, particularly towards the end of their life get squared off. Note: my experience is with a Thruxton, a different bike to your Scrambler, that may be slightly higher at the seat anyway????

As you are in the UK, definitely call the factory for their advice. Also before you do, check out their website so you are better prepared as to options available and questions to ask. I incurred the international phone charges and still well worth it!!
 

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Cheers.

fwiw pretty sure the Scrambler and Thruxton share the same stock shocks and fork springs. Tbh other than the 270° crank all the differences are aesthetic.
 

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Hagon Shock Jock

Got a bit of a dilemma here with my new Hagon twin rear shocks.

From scanning the forum I see most people are running either 18kg or 20kg springs, with the odd 16kg. Mine came with 18 and I was a little disappointed in the ride, so did some road testing by pushing the rubber bump stop down until it contacted the damper body and going for a ride. To my surprise the shocks bottomed out on the low and mid preload, and almost bottomed on the high preload, missing by 2mm. I'm 73kg (160lb), and whilst the roads around here are not great, they are not third world by any means. The shocks are standard 340mm.

Considering the travel available is 70mm, and that the dynamic forces on the bike are significantly higher than the static, I thought that around 15mm of static deflection in the shock would be about right for rider and bike on the lowest preload, Tested it and got 25mm. I then ran some tests and determined that the sprung mass for rider and bike in my case is 74kg per shock. This includes an additional load penalty to the shock because it is leaning forward and therefore at a mechanical disadvantage. From this the calculated spring deflection was heavier than I got in practice, until I discovered that the damper also exerts around 15kg of resistance through its travel. Then the results were identical.

So where do I go from here? The Hagon vendor has offered to put 20kg springs on but I'm not even sure this is enough, considering the road tests. I might add that I also priced a set of Bitubo shocks, and they come with 24kg springs.

Thanks.
 

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Went for the 2810's in the end in black with chrome springs.



Hoping that will match the all black of my scram, but with a nice bit of contrast from the chrome. Also hoping the chrome is decent, as I'm always a bit nervous about modern chrome quality.

Opted for 350mm. A little nervous about foot reach after riding at the bonnie height / 340mm. But figured it's a good middle ground and may bring back some of the scrambler feeling. Who knows one day I may even find the time to do the front end!

Total price was 206.50GBP, which is more than I was hoping to spend, but as the previous shock manufacturer of the broken shocks still hasn't come back to me, I figured it was safer to go with a known quantity.
 

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Surprised that is still up after 1st April.

Those do look exceptionally cheap! In fairness my exploded Tec shocks look much better than those and do have real damping adjustment.
(or had I guess... well the left still does!)

Although the irony of this bit made me chuckle:
But casual passers-by will think you have $1500+ exotic high-end racing shocks… and isn’t that all that really matters?
'cause let's be honest, that's the only reason people actually put bling piggy-back Ohlins on an lump like an air cooled Triumph.
 

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My Hagons are here. Not sure when I'll get around to fitting them, but its a step in the right direction.


The chrome springs are much more visually dominant than I expected. They also pretty tubby - definitely a lot heavier than the tec ones.... although I'm hoping this means they won't randomly come apart like the tec shocks.
 

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Crosspost from what did you do to your twin today, but thought I should update this thread following my first ride on my new Hagon 2810 rear shocks.




I’m impressed. It's that classic “they’re better” feeling. Firm, but not harsh, bumps are smoother, etc. I've not touched a thing either, just put them on straight out the box as set up by the guys at Hagon.

Obviously I have to give two caveats; first, my last ride on the TEC Bike Parts piggy back shocks was effectively only on one shock, as the drive-side one had fallen apart). Second, idk much about proper suspension adjustment and the TEC Bike Parts shock came on the bike 2nd hand so idk what weight springs were on them, whereas the Hagon were given my weight and bike model.

On the handling, although I sort of enjoyed the lazy handling of the short rear, it is better at 350mm (-10mm from stock). Flat-footing is borderline, but close enough, and better than the stock 360mm for 5ft 8' me. I'm going to leave the front at stock.

Overall I think they are a good upgrade for the Triumph air-cooled twins, and proportionate with the abilities* of an old, heavy, and slightly flawed design. No doubt better shocks are better, but ~£200 for a set of British shocks seem like the right choice. Will report back on how they hold up.


*and let's be honest they probably suppose my abilities.
 

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About a month ago I noticed oil on the swing arm under the left shock. A little investigation showed the seal on my TEC Remote Reservoir had failed and was bleeding out. Checked the other side and it was starting to leak as well. About 2000 miles on them...and they were done. I picked up the TECs because I got tired of the stockers bouncing me out of the saddle (I'm 160 wet) with all our road construction - and they seemed like a nice cheap option. Overall, they ended up being a significant improvement, well damped and I went with Thruxton length to sharpen up the handling (and it did). But, decided it was time to get something better.

I got in touch with Michael at BelleCorse about some quality options, and we decided on a set of Gazi Sport X matched with Matris Emulators up front.

Out of the box the Gazis are clearly an upgrade - really well made, excellent fit and finish, huge threaded clevises, and nice spherical bearings.



I did notice that the threads on the TEC clevices were really thrashed, very sloppy tolerance that I don’t remember from when I set them up...



The TEC steel sleeves were a nightmare to remove from the frame perches, but the Gazis slid right on. It was immediately obvious that the springs were softer, but I no issues setting preload, went with recommended rebound and went off for a ride. I’ve put about 100 miles on varying conditions and I’m really happy with the results. They are active, but well damped - and really improve the ride. I’ll post back once I have some more miles on them.



Ride great, look sharp. Well worth the upgrade.

 

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About a month ago I noticed oil on the swing arm under the left shock. A little investigation showed the seal on my TEC Remote Reservoir had failed and was bleeding out. Checked the other side and it was starting to leak as well. About 2000 miles on them...and they were done. I picked up the TECs because I got tired of the stockers bouncing me out of the saddle (I'm 160 wet) with all our road construction - and they seemed like a nice cheap option. Overall, they ended up being a significant improvement, well damped and I went with Thruxton length to sharpen up the handling (and it did). But, decided it was time to get something better.

I got in touch with Michael at BelleCorse about some quality options, and we decided on a set of Gazi Sport X matched with Matris Emulators up front.

Out of the box the Gazis are clearly an upgrade - really well made, excellent fit and finish, huge threaded clevises, and nice spherical bearings.



I did notice that the threads on the TEC clevices were really thrashed, very sloppy tolerance that I don’t remember from when I set them up...



The TEC steel sleeves were a nightmare to remove from the frame perches, but the Gazis slid right on. It was immediately obvious that the springs were softer, but I no issues setting preload, went with recommended rebound and went off for a ride. I’ve put about 100 miles on varying conditions and I’m really happy with the results. They are active, but well damped - and really improve the ride. I’ll post back once I have some more miles on them.



Ride great, look sharp. Well worth the upgrade.

Haven't been on here in while (getting spit off and beaten up does that), and haven't seen much traffic on the Gazi shocks, good the see they are a quality product.
Thanks
Matt
 

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More miles, and I'm really happy with the Gazis. Comparison of stock, TEC, Gazi.



On the Bike:

 

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So I've been eyeing some used rear shocks from a Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto. Reason being they're at a steal for the price, and I desperately want something taller (15"/380mm seems perfect). I realize they're not the best out there, and many opt for the old ZRX set, but I'm not a serious racer and only care for a small improvement over stock, and these Duc pair are around the price of new Hagon Roads.

Does anyone know how difficult it would be to swap in a proper set of bushings to fit my air-cooled Thruxton? Or any advice on pulling the trigger vs steering clear?

I just find it difficult to imagine finding a pair of gas reservoir 15"ers at a better deal. What say you?
 

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Can't help with the fitting and how raising the rear end is going to affect handling (my guess would be badly if you just raise one end), but before I bought second hand shocks, I'd want to know their history, how many miles they've done, was the guy a lardy fella or a stringbean, trackdays, etc, etc. Personally, getting 2nd hand shocks seems like a hell of a gamble. My neighbour's son has a 600 Bandit and the shock on that is absolutely shot - can you be sure that the shocks you're after are in any better nick?
 

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On the handling I can tell you based on my experience on a Thruxton, swapping out harsh the stock 360mm rears for Hagon 2810s at 370mm (+10mm) accelerated the turn in significantly. Flips faster on cornering. Pleased with the results after couple of years. For the fronts height remains same, but added Ricor Intiminators (retaining stock Triumph front fork springs) to reduce the dive on braking.

Overall I don't see doing any more on the suspension than maybe tweaking the settings!
 

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Can't help with the fitting and how raising the rear end is going to affect handling (my guess would be badly if you just raise one end), but before I bought second hand shocks, I'd want to know their history, how many miles they've done, was the guy a lardy fella or a stringbean, trackdays, etc, etc. Personally, getting 2nd hand shocks seems like a hell of a gamble. My neighbour's son has a 600 Bandit and the shock on that is absolutely shot - can you be sure that the shocks you're after are in any better nick?
Well, the shocks are now gone because of the ridiculous price. Buyer was offering returns, so all-in my gamble came down to return shipping and any fitment work.

As for raising the rear, I'm aware of the effects it will have on handling. At present, my only concern would be potentially needing a chain tensioner. I like to experiment with geometry on all my bikes; some of the posts I've read through the years saying how terrible something was have been among the best adjustments I've made to wrangle a bike more to my liking. To each their own, but I do appreciate the courtesy warning.

On the handling I can tell you based on my experience on a Thruxton, swapping out harsh the stock 360mm rears for Hagon 2810s at 370mm (+10mm) accelerated the turn in significantly. Flips faster on cornering. Pleased with the results after couple of years. For the fronts height remains same, but added Ricor Intiminators (retaining stock Triumph front fork springs) to reduce the dive on braking.

Overall I don't see doing any more on the suspension than maybe tweaking the settings!
I've had my mind set on Intiminators for a while now, just wanted to find a proper rear shock to match and sort both ends all at once. I certainly haven't written off Hagons yet, and have a pretty realistic approach to what I feel the bike (and I) can achieve. (No need to spend outlandish money; I ride aggressively on Texas twisties but hardly plan on any track days, if ever. Only around 150lbs, and can't see packing on very much more in the future.) Minimal adjustment and appropriate springrate is likely all I could get proper use of.

The Free Spirits riser sets have my eye too, to adjust lower shockmount points forward or up. Seems like fun potential for tweaking.
 

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