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I am adding a set of universal saddle bag bars which mount to the passenger pegs and the upper shock mount location. Any suggestions on where to buy longer shock mount bolts that are correct for a 2014 Bonnie?
 

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I would think you could go into any hardware store/big box store and get longer bolts, they all carry metric stuff now, not being able to see my bike and to lazy to go out and look but I dont remember the bolt heads being anything special, someone will correct me if not, SS I assume but those are readily available.
 

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If I remember correctly the bolts screw into a threaded steel sleeve (that is part of the frame), so I'd think that load bearing properties would be unimportant.
 

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I got stainless bolts at my local Ace Hardware store that were 5mm longer than factory when I mounted my Givi rack. Look oem, no problem.
 

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If I remember correctly the bolts screw into a threaded steel sleeve (that is part of the frame), so I'd think that load bearing properties would be unimportant.
I put the emphasis on load-bearing only because any failure there is likely to be catastrophic. Sheer strength is not the only factor. What would you torque the weaker bolt to? If you torque it to factory spec, you could exceed its rating, guaranteeing a failure. If you torque it below spec, you're not meeting the design criteria, risking other failure modes. No manufacturer pays more for parts than they absolutely have to. They're not going to pay more for a particular grade bolt if a cheaper bolt will do.
It's OK to be stupid with farkles but with anything else, don't second-guess the factory.
 

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@KC1961 is right, he's not being stupid at all. I agree that you don't want to replace strong screws with weak ones, but that's not the case here. You barely torque those screws, they just keep the shock from coming off the stud they sit on that's welded to the frame.

Actually, because they take so little torque, it's important to use threadlock on them. Triumph considers them use-once items, because OEM comes with threadlock already applied to the threads, but you can just apply your own.
 

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I wouldn't call 28Nm so little torque; that's more than the fork clamp bolts and plenty other critical fasteners. And why anyone would argue against erring on the side of safety is beyond me. In an emergency, that's one thing but for convenience? Well-intentioned, I'm sure but still bad advice.
Just a simple rule for those who may not know better: if you always replace factory hardware with same or higher grade hardware and tighten to specs, you will never contribute to a failure.
 

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I wouldn't call 28Nm so little torque; that's more than the fork clamp bolts and plenty other critical fasteners. And why anyone would argue against erring on the side of safety is beyond me. In an emergency, that's one thing but for convenience? Well-intentioned, I'm sure but still bad advice.
Just a simple rule for those who may not know better: if you always replace factory hardware with same or higher grade hardware and tighten to specs, you will never contribute to a failure.
Have you even looked at how the rear shock mounts? In an emergency I would use a piece of wire torqued to whatever funny number you want and I'd bet it'd hold. The shock mounts on a metal sleeve that is welded to the frame, the bolt only keeps it from sliding off. I'm not an engineer but I bet those at Triumph didnt speck something out of the ordinary to do anymore then keep a part from sliding off.
 

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Interesting post as I just ordered a set of luggage carriers for my Bonnie to accommodate some soft luggage I just bought. I am not sure if the set I bought comes with longer mounting bolts.

Rick G
 

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I wouldn't call 28Nm so little torque; that's more than the fork clamp bolts and plenty other critical fasteners. And why anyone would argue against erring on the side of safety is beyond me. In an emergency, that's one thing but for convenience? Well-intentioned, I'm sure but still bad advice.
Just a simple rule for those who may not know better: if you always replace factory hardware with same or higher grade hardware and tighten to specs, you will never contribute to a failure.
28NM? That's different than my 2015 Thruxton at 27NM.
 
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