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Discussion Starter #1
After 300 miles towards running-in, my rear chain needs adjusting. It also needs lubing. What ideas do you folks have on the best stuff to use and the best way of going about it? I am not going to take the chain off, wash it in paraffin, then melt a tub of Linklyfe and soak it in that overnight - all I want to do is apply whatever's good to my chain, that'll hopefully stay on for a while.

Oh, by the way, it is an ordinary Renold chain, not O ring fancy stuff, and its on a TR7.
 

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Everyone has a favorite, but I'm quite happy with the Motul line of cleaners and lubes.

Having said that, let the games begin: Jim
 

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I did a little research a while back and decided on PJ1 Blue which is for o-ring chains. It is intended to penetrate and lubricate plus it does not sling off. So far, it's pretty good.

When you think about it, lubing a chain is probably does as much damage as it does protect. Dust and grit cling to the lube and get into the nooks and crannies when you relube it, makes for a nice lapping compound to eat away at the moving parts. If it were not for rust, I've often wondered if a dry chain would not last longer if made from the correct materials. A nickel plated chain may be a better alternative. But there's that damn water thingy that just screws up the whole dry chain idea.

regards,
Rob
 

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This subject has been done to death, just like oil and filters. That said, I (sparingly) use what Honda recommend on their Fireblade Superbikes: Hypoy 80/90 gear oil both as lubricant and chain cleaner.

 

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I tried boiling my chain up in link life, was flung all over the wheel and filled the chain guard, after that i tried a Wurth product which also flung all over the wheel, next was Castrol spray chain lube which did exactly the same thing. Now after many years of having a seamingly permanent black rear rim, i am using a spray chain wax. Spray it on last thing in the evening and leave it to set. Back wheel stays lovely and clean.

Rod
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This subject has been done to death, just like oil and filters. That said, I (sparingly) use what Honda recommend on their Fireblade Superbikes: Hypoy 80/90 gear oil both as lubricant and chain cleaner.

That's interesting because that's what I used to do years ago, before switching to Guzzis and forgetting about chains. I'd have my bike on centrestand, engine ticking over fast, in gear with raer wheel spinning slowly, then dribble EP90 on the chain just ahead of the bottom of the rear sprocket. This seemed a good idea to me, but whoever I told about it seemed to scoff at it - if it turns out this method is recommended by Honda, that settles it! Nice and cheap too.
 

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That's interesting because that's what I used to do years ago, before switching to Guzzis and forgetting about chains. I'd have my bike on centrestand, engine ticking over fast, in gear with raer wheel spinning slowly, then dribble EP90 on the chain just ahead of the bottom of the rear sprocket. This seemed a good idea to me, but whoever I told about it seemed to scoff at it - if it turns out this method is recommended by Honda, that settles it! Nice and cheap too.


For those doubting thomases, here is a scan from the Honda Fireblade OEM 2004-2005 Service Manual:

Image uploading. Refresh page to view


 

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I tend to use the Castrol (white) spray on chain wax. But if I run out the stuff - then whatever is cheap in the local Halfords.
 

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What ideas do you folks have on the best stuff to use and the best way of going about it?
I use whatever aerosol chain lube is on sale. I think more/routine oiling is more important than which product. At the moment I have "Liquid Wrench Chain Lube" ($3.00). I try to do it every time the bike is on the centre stand. I like when I finish a can. Makes me think I'm responsible with my maintenance. (Ha!) :eek:
 

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I'm currently using Wurth dry chain lube. The important thing is to put it on when your chain is still hot from a ride and leave it on overnight..no splashy.
 

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I'm currently using Wurth dry chain lube. The important thing is to put it on when your chain is still hot from a ride and leave it on overnight..no splashy.
Definitely!! The chain heat also helps "wick" the lube to the innards. After it sets take a rag and wipe off any excess lube.

dale
 

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My first bike was a Honda C70, my second bike was a Honda CB200 (which I still own ) both Honda manuals recommended using EP90 gear oil and I have used it for the last 26years. I Drizzle a little on the inside edges where the plates over lap after a ride when the chain is warm after a ride. Do this in the evening, I leave my 'old chain oiling trousers' on the floor under the chain to catch the drips. In the morning wipe the chain over to remove any excess, you only really want the pins and rollers lubed. Once a year I use paraffin and an old tooth brush to wash the chain off, I take the chain off to do this.

This method is for non o ring chains I have fitted to my old bikes, I can't remember the last time I changed a chain on my oldies so it must be working and it's dirt cheap! My CZ with it's fully enclosed chain guard has covered 40odd thousand miles on the same chain and sprockets, the sprockets look the same as the day I bought the bike.
 

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Semi-auto Oiling Chain

My first bike was a Honda C70, my second bike was a Honda CB200 (which I still own ) both Honda manuals recommended using EP90 gear oil and I have used it for the last 26years. I Drizzle a little on the inside edges where the plates over lap after a ride when the chain is warm after a ride. Do this in the evening, I leave my 'old chain oiling trousers' on the floor under the chain to catch the drips. In the morning wipe the chain over to remove any excess, you only really want the pins and rollers lubed. Once a year I use paraffin and an old tooth brush to wash the chain off, I take the chain off to do this.



This method is for non o ring chains I have fitted to my old bikes, I can't remember the last time I changed a chain on my oldies so it must be working and it's dirt cheap! My CZ with it's fully enclosed chain guard has covered 40odd thousand miles on the same chain and sprockets, the sprockets look the same as the day I bought the bike.
I have Loobman semi automatic oilers fitted to both the 955 & 885. Running a mixture of chainsaw bar oil and kerosine (more or less kerosine depending on Winter/Summer). At the press of a button as much as or as less of an amount of lube heads down the tube to the chain to be delivered by twin heads (one either side of the sprocket).
Used very spareingly on 'X' ring chains it is a thorough success.
Hopefully success will follow when a unit is fitted to the T140.
 

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I use a loobman on my Trophy, its cheap and works great. I use E90 gear oil and wound the tubing around the rear coolant pipe which warms the oil and helps it run better.
Tend to do longish trips so a long run of oil works ok for me.

Sent from my GT-I9100P using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Every product works, when applied how it's supposed to. Most of the time, lazyness is the n°1 chain-destroyer IMHO.

If you keep your bike shiny and polished, and lube/clean it after and before every ride, i would use a wax/grease product. They (as said before) don't make a mess on the back rim (less, that is) and they do their job when maintained correctly.
A disadvantage (i went through quite some chains) is dirt sticking in it, making a good grinding paste from it. So cleaning the chain is even more important than lubing it. Do not spray wax over a dirty chain. Just take the time to clean it before you lube it with wax/grease.

If you're a little lazy, maybe oil is your thing. The backside of the bike will be oily all over, but the advantage of it is that dirt is also flying off. That's why you can ride 50-60.000km with a scottoiler, without doing anything else but occasional tensioning. The dirt will be on the bike, but it's doing nothing wrong.
A disadvantage here is the high frequency of lubing when doing it manually. But, it's faster.

I went from wax to oil for my bikes.
 

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Chain Lube

In a life gone by during ownership of a 61' T110 I did the right thing by the chain and purchased this round tin of 'special' grease with instructions to place the tin over heat and gently melt the grease, clean the removed chain and then roll up and immerse in the hot grease and let sit for a while. The idea being, according to the instructions, for the semi liquid grease to flow into the roller pins of the chain. All very good until Mother came home! For this was being done on the stove top in HER kitchen.
This presented the opportunity for the Ole' Man to allow me to use his precious Primus (in future) as long as it wasn't used in HIS garage. Talk about living and learning!
Times have changed and just as well, for it was a messy ****e of a job.
 
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