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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I don't believe in "servicing" my bikes at certain intervals of mileage or time. Never have done a "service" in my life. Instead I use common sense to do my maintenance as I go along, small, simple day to day tasks rather than a lot of things on a list at the same time.

Many is the time I advise someone to adjust or lubricate their rusty and drooping chain, or take-up their excessive clutch lever slack, tighten levers on splined shafts to avoid wear, top-up oil level, look at their obviously worn out brake pads that are scoring the disc, or even something as basic as pumping up their obviously deflated tyres, to be rewarded with a sneer, a shrug of the shoulders and a dismissive: "It's going in for a service in a couple of months time mate...", They're really thinking: "Piss off you nosey c--t", so they suffer inferior performance and risk accelerated wear and damage because the dealer will (if they're lucky) take care of it at some date in the future.

It's no wonder you see very few older bikes about, specially considering how reliable and well-built bikes are nowadays. Scrap yards are full of neglected 4-5 year old examples.

A quick look over the bike while cleaning or even while putting your gear on, for example, can reveal the need for adjustments, replacements, bolt tightening or lubrication of certain components. The exception to all the above is of course things like valve clearance adjustments and oil/filter changes.
Manufacturers intervals should be more or less adhered to.

ONE OF THE PROBLEMS:

One task I really hate on my Bonnie is the casual inspection of the rear brake caliper for such things as pad wear, fluid leaks, security of fasteners, etc.

The bastard is sited in the worst possible place to effectively inspect, clean or even check the pads: right underneath the swing arm and nicely hidden behind the left silencer. Also being on the left, if you only have a side stand it's even worse.

Crawling on the floor with a flashlight is the order of the day, only to be confronted with a component covered with road dirt, mud, dead badgers, etc difficult to clean and inspect, and liable to corrode and seize its moving parts due to aforesaid crud. In countries where they dump truckloads of salt on the road at the first sign of a nip in the air, you can guarantee seizure of the pad sliding pins and/or piston corrosion.

On a road bike it might pass, but on something like the Scrambler that can ostensibly be used in the dirt, this location is unforgiveable. Prone to damage by rocks and clogging with mud. Check out KTM'S and other classy dirt bikes and see where they fit their rear calipers: on top of the swing arm.

Strangely Triumph have seen fit to locate the caliper on top on the two Cruisers: Speedmaster and America, lucky sods...:)

I realise that the low position helps with such slightly abstract concepts like centre of gravity, unsprung weight, etc but this isn't race-bred superbike exotica. It's a slightly obese classic retro roadster. Makes me smile to see that Triumph have drilled out the middle of both front and rear axles with a 7 mm hole right through...what's that for?, lightening?. Saves nearly as much weight as having a piss...:)

THE SOLUTION:

THE UpNOver CALIPER RELOCATION BRACKET FROM TRIUMPH TWIN POWER!.

Photo of the kit:



Luckily there's a neat and effective cure for this from triumphtwinpower.com in the shape of their beautifully-made and finished "UpNOver" billet caliper bracket. This relocates the caliper to the top of the swing arm, in full view, easy to maintain and clean and, on the Scramblers that are used in the dirt, safe from damage.

It's not cheap, but there again real quality never is. Machined all over from a solid block rather than cast like the original, it looks great and, unlike a lot of after-market "goodies", this one fits perfectly without having to persuade it with hammers and files, comes complete with a new, high quality braided brake hose with stainless steel banjo unions and new sealing washers, and the workmanship and finish is up there with the best.

The weight is slightly less than the OEM item at 0.4Kg (0.9 Lbs).

Triumph Twin Performance are obviously proud of it as evidenced by a huge but tasteful engraved "TTP" logo on it...:)

Photo of an example on a bike taken from the makers site. Mine will follow shortly:



THE INSTALLATION

Installation is simplicity itself for most people with a basic knowledge of wrenching so no instructions come with the kit, but I'll include a procedure here to help those that are not too sure:

You start by placing the bike on the centre stand or other lifting and supporting device. Place block of wood or a small car jack with a wide lifting foot or piece of wood under the wheel to support the weight of it. Lacking this you could always tie it up to the frame with a rope. The idea is to prevent the slight drop that will take place as the rear shock absorbers stretch once the axle is removed, and keep the axle holes more or less aligned.

If you use a lifting jack rather than the centre stand you could always just raise the bike enough to just leave the wheel touching the ground and so supported and prevented from dropping.

Disconnect hydraulic banjo union from the caliper using spanner or socket. Ignore the loss of fluid as you'll be replacing this line with the longer one supplied with the kit. Discard copper seals and place banjo bolt somewhere clean for re-use.

Loosen off and remove the two caliper mounting bolts. Remove caliper and clean it now, or you can wait until it's re-installed in the new, more accessible position.

Have the new caliper bracket ready by your left side with the axle hole greased. A little smear of grease on the machined slot will help re-installation, but it's not essential.

Undo rear axle nut with 24mm spanner or socket while holding the other side with a 19mm spanner to prevent rotation. Withdraw axle and put aside. You could now clean it and re-grease the whole surface lightly. This will ease re-insertion and prevent future corrosion, making it easier to remove next time. Try to keep the wheel steady to avoid spacers dropping out of position.

The OEM caliper bracket is a sliding fit onto a raised guide portion built into the inner face of the swing arm, so you should now be able to pull it off rearwards.

Before anything moves out of place take the new bracket with the TTP engraved logo to the top left side and slide it on to the swing arm guide until the axle hole is roughly in line with the hub and chain adjuster axle holes.

Re-insert the previously cleaned and greased axle from the left hand side through the chain adjuster, new bracket, hub and spacers and out the other side. Wiggle the components about to obtain alignment. Replace axle nut and tighten lightly but not fully.

Perform chain slack adjustment and alignment check as normal and then fully tighten rear axle nut to 85 Nm (62Ft/Lbs). Don't forget to tighten the 8mm adjuster drawbolts in an anti-clockwise direction to 5Nm (3.7Ft/Lbs).

Spread the pads using a screwdriver or small wedge and slip caliper over the disc rotor and align with the new holes on the bracket. Re-insert bolts and tighten to 40Nm (30Ft/Lbs).

Remove right side panel and undo the master cylinder banjo union and once again discard seals and hose.

Following the same routing and frame clips as the original hydraulic hose, fit the new hose to the frame. The exception being the caliper end of the hose that has to be routed towards the top of the swing arm rather than the underside.

Start by re-fitting the master cylinder banjo union using two new seals supplied with the kit. Tighten the banjo to 25Nm(18 Ft/Lbs). Once the hose is positioned correctly and held by its clips, re-fit the caliper banjo union tightening also to 25Nm(18 Ft/Lbs).

Re-fill and bleed the system using DOT4 brake fluid. This will take longer than usual due to the fact that the new hose has to be re-filled with fluid and all the air it contains flushed out.

There are specific instructions on Triumph Twin Power web site for bleeding the traditional way. They're under "installation".

I've used the Gunson "EEZIBLEED" pressure system. This is mainly for use on cars but can be adapted for use on the Bonnie. This system needs a modified brake fluid reservoir cap. The kit comes with a variety of different ones suitable for most cars, but nothing for bikes. To use it you either need a spare reservoir cap that can be modified or, like I did, remove the reservoir altogether and attach the pressure and fluid delivery hose directly to the reservoir outlet hose or the master cylinder hose spigot. Once the system is flushed and refilled (takes just one or two minutes!) and no more air bubbles are evident at the bleed nipple, the reservoir can be replaced and slowly filled up to ensure no air bubbles get in.

This device works so well that you can't help smile at the ridiculous ease of it all, compared with the horror stories of brake bleeding sagas I often read about.

See it here:

http://www.gunson.co.uk/item.aspx?cat=674&item=1818
 

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Forchetto: i read most of the stuff you post on this forum...
and i have learned ALOT..
but this time im just out of words...

awesome writeup!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

you should get paid by TTP for this "ad"
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
In the photo, it looks like the brake hose goes between the coils of the shock.
I got that photo from the makers site, will do my own this weekend and post them.

My rear suspension units are fully shrouded, no coil springs waving in the breeze, but even so the hose doesn't touch them. It runs close but being quite stiff, once in position it doesn't move much.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
But with the bleed screw located low in the caliper in the "over" position can you get a good air bleed? Typically the bleed point is the highest point on the caliper. In the lower position it was the highest point. Was this a problem in your case?

Thanks ....
Right. Good comment.

On the makers site under the "Installation" tab in the products page, there are specific instructions to do the bleeding. These must be followed. I quote:

With the new positioning of the caliper, it is best to bleed the system with the caliper off the bracket and with the bleed nipple upper most to ensure all air is evacuated. If bleeding the system by stroking the rear brake lever, ensure you have put a piece of wood of 6-8mm thickness between the pads. If you are using a syringe and clear tube to bleed the system, the 6-8mm piece of wood is not necessary.

http://www.triumphtwinpower.com/upnover-caliper-bracket.php
 

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Thanks ...

Right. Good comment.

On the makers site under the "Installation" tab in the products page, there are specific instructions to do the bleeding. These must be followed. I quote:

With the new positioning of the caliper, it is best to bleed the system with the caliper off the bracket and with the bleed nipple upper most to ensure all air is evacuated. If bleeding the system by stroking the rear brake lever, ensure you have put a piece of wood of 6-8mm thickness between the pads. If you are using a syringe and clear tube to bleed the system, the 6-8mm piece of wood is not necessary.

http://www.triumphtwinpower.com/upnover-caliper-bracket.php
Great!! Thanks ... looks like there will be a new farkle under the Christmas tree for my Scrambler this year!!

PD
 

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Forchetto,
Great right up! A couple of questions for you:
- Can you now actually see the brake pads to inspect for wear and thickness?
- Looking at your brake hose, is there enough room to turn it over so the bend in the banjo goes down towards the swing arm rather than up in the air?
- Does the kit come with a long enough hose to run the hose along the swing arm?

Thanks for the info,
RR
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Forchetto,
Great right up! A couple of questions for you:
- Can you now actually see the brake pads to inspect for wear and thickness?
- Looking at your brake hose, is there enough room to turn it over so the bend in the banjo goes down towards the swing arm rather than up in the air?
- Does the kit come with a long enough hose to run the hose along the swing arm?

Thanks for the info,
RR
The pads can be clearly seen from behind. You just look for the grooves on them. When the grooves more or less disappear, the pads should be changed (min thickness 1.5mm), although you could eek out a few more miles out of them if need be.

I fitted the caliper end hose with the bend upwards following the makers photo, and when I got to the master cylinder end I found that the other banjo fitting also ended up facing up when it would have been better facing down, at least on the master end. No chance of just twisting it though, too tough.

With a bit of fiddling I managed to fit it, but will change it in the next month or two when it'll ready for new pads. I'll fit both ends pointing down.

The hose is a bit longer than the original, but not much more. You have to position it very well to reach both ends.

Not easy to thread through the same route as the original, had to use the old control cable swap trick of tying the new hose to the old one and pulling the new one through. Not easy though.

Note there's an error in my post:

The master cylinder on mine doesn't have a banjo bolt as such on the master cylinder. The hydraulic brake light switch doubles up as a banjo bolt, with all the drillings, etc.

The tightening torque should be 15 Nm (11 Lbs/Ft) rather than the 25 Nm stated in the write-up. The 25 Nm is OK for the "real" banjo bolt fitted to the caliper end.
 

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Thanks for the info. Looks like another mod that I'll have to add to my growing list of things I'd like to do at some point.
 

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I fitted the caliper end hose with the bend upwards following the makers photo, and when I got to the master cylinder end I found that the other banjo fitting also ended up facing up when it would have been better facing down, at least on the master end. No chance of just twisting it though, too tough.
The brake hose banjo's should angle up at the caliper end to guide the hose over the end of the caliper and down at the master cylinder end. The hose should be routed the same as the original.

Sorry your hose banjo's were the wrong orientation, I'll get another correctly oriented one out to you. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The brake hose banjo's should angle up at the caliper end to guide the hose over the end of the caliper and down at the master cylinder end. The hose should be routed the same as the original.

Sorry your hose banjo's were the wrong orientation, I'll get another correctly oriented one out to you. :)
Great. Thanks Mike.
 

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Probably a dumb question, but would the America bracket fit on the Bonnie? I noticed the photos in Haynes show pics of the America caliper setup which looks pretty similar... it's the same caliper and same size brake disc?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Probably a dumb question, but would the America bracket fit on the Bonnie? I noticed the photos in Haynes show pics of the America caliper setup which looks pretty similar... it's the same caliper and same size brake disc?
I thought about that, as the OEM parts are not that expensive but, according to these drawings, the two brackets are completely different shape and part numbers:

This is Bike Bandits drawing for the 2009 America:

http://www.bikebandit.com/2009-triumph-motorcycle-america-rear-brake-caliper-disc/o/m18730sch631086

And this for the 2009 Bonneville and T100:

http://www.bikebandit.com/2009-triumph-motorcycle-bonneville-t100-rear-brake-caliper-disc/o/m18731sch631142
 

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Oh yeah, sorry, I don't think I was clear in my meaning - I know they're both different, that's what I mean. The Bonnie has the angled underslung caliper and the America has the up-high straight caliper location. I mean could the America bracket be used instead of (the very high quality of course!) expensive aftermarket alternatives?

All the other codes appear to be the same (except for the pads - which is weird as EBC say the same pads are compatable for both?). I know the America has a 5 bolt rotor 2, but they're still the same overall diameter.
 

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Different Alternative

If you really want to lower the cost of brake bleeding and ease of process, you might try "Speed Bleeders." No need for a Mity Vac or Gunson/EEZIBLEED. You can also use brake line quick couplers for caliper removal. We've been using them in all our racing applications for years. The entire process of caliper removal and replacement, takes minutes.

Also, using DOT 5 instead of 4 will not damage your paint and does not absorb moisture like DOT 3 & 4 will. Continual heat cycling won't brake down it's properties as quickly as 3 or 4.

Also there's an alternative to the TwinPower bracket, "Discacciati brake system," I'm employing on my Thruxton. The rear brake on the Thruxton is hard to modulate at speed and gives a very vague feeling. Being made out of cast material it holds a considerable amount of heat. The result of using this system is lighter weight better heat dispersion and much improved brake modulation. Along with the above mentioned modifications, it will make the process of replacement much easier. Additionally, moving the caliper over the top, will take it out of the debris field created from the front wheel. Another interesting modification I'll be making will be the addition of a thumb control along with the foot control for the rear brake.

Cheers

Jeff:motorbike2



 

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If you really want to lower the cost of brake bleeding and ease of process, you might try "Speed Bleeders." No need for a Mity Vac or Gunson/EEZIBLEED. You can also use brake line quick couplers for caliper removal. We've been using them in all our racing applications for years. The entire process of caliper removal and replacement, takes minutes.

Also, using DOT 5 instead of 4 will not damage your paint and does not absorb moisture like DOT 3 & 4 will. Continual heat cycling won't brake down it's properties as quickly as 3 or 4.

Also there's an alternative to the TwinPower bracket, "Discacciati brake system," I'm employing on my Thruxton. The rear brake on the Thruxton is hard to modulate at speed and gives a very vague feeling. Being made out of cast material it holds a considerable amount of heat. The result of using this system is lighter weight better heat dispersion and much improved brake modulation. Along with the above mentioned modifications, it will make the process of replacement much easier. Additionally, moving the caliper over the top, will take it out of the debris field created from the front wheel. Another interesting modification I'll be making will be the addition of a thumb control along with the foot control for the rear brake.

Cheers

Jeff:motorbike2



Any updates on either of these systems?
 

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Great right up as usual Forchetto looks like a real good piece of kit and we usually have to pay big bucks for that, but may I humbly suggest your swear words and intended swear words are printed in Spanish as they make a shy retiring Pommie like me blush with embarrassment!
 
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