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Discussion Starter #1
Hopefully someone will be able to shed some light on this for me. My 2007 America seems to be getting through rear pads rather quickly, I fitted a set of EBC pads around 2000 miles ago, I looked at them today and one of the pads is looking close to the end of it's life, the other looks fine. There is some scoring on the disc but I wouldn't say its any worse than can be expected. Does anyone know if rapid rear pad wear is normal on an America or is something a miss?

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me with this, Jerry
 

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It could be that the piston is not sliding in and out of the caliper smoothly - remove the caliper from the bike and check for corrosion on the piston. If the piston is nice and clean see it it can be pushed back into the caliper - if it is incredibly stiff you may have to rebuild the caliper (plenty of kits on eBay)

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It could be that the piston is not sliding in and out of the caliper smoothly - remove the caliper from the bike and check for corrosion on the piston. If the piston is nice and clean see it it can be pushed back into the caliper - if it is incredibly stiff you may have to rebuild the caliper (plenty of kits on eBay)

Tim
I've got the rear wheel out at the moment, i'll go and give it a good looking over. Thanks Tim
 

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Sounds like your caliper may be sticking, not sliding freely on the pins. Another common problem is dirty, sticking caliper pistons and seals. If the pistons can't be pushed back into the bores easily they need to be removed and cleaned as well as cleaning the caliper bores and grooves and clean/replace the seals.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sounds like your caliper may be sticking, not sliding freely on the pins. Another common problem is dirty, sticking caliper pistons and seals. If the pistons can't be pushed back into the bores easily they need to be removed and cleaned as well as cleaning the caliper bores and grooves and clean/replace the seals.
I must admit when I changed the pads the last time it was peeing down with rain so I quickly fitted them but didn't put any lube on the slider pins just so I could use the bike. I'll have a good look and give the caliper a good clean.

Cheers, Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Right I've given the caliper a good clean, the piston's are in good order with no corrosion or anything but the front piston did seem to be a bit 'stiffer' to push in than the the back one, so I cleaned 'em up and pumped them in and out a few times and everything seems free-er now. You're right about the pins not sliding easily rweb, I cleaned these up and gave them a coat of copper grease to help them along, so I'll see how things go.
I usually fit EBC pads to my bikes but does anyone have any recommendations for rear pads that might give a longer life?

Cheers, Jerry
 

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I switched from OEM to EBC HH a few years ago. The HH pads last longer.
 

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HH lasts longer. The organics let you get on the rear brakes harder without locking up the tire. But it's just a matter of feel. I ran the organics a while and have gone back to the sintered ones myself.

Either should last a lot longer than 2,000 miles, getting those pins sliding smoothly should do it.

I wore out a few pads from over-greasing those pins, packing some into the holes there. Cause I'm a dumb ass. Pins weren't sliding cause there wasn't enough room. Finally got smarter and just coated the pins well. Maybe not "smarter", just less dumb.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone, I've gone and ordered a set of them EBC HH pads, £21.50 from ebay. According to the write up these bad boys should last for 20,000 miles! I'll have to wait a while to see if that's true.

Thanks again, Jerry
 

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After the OE pads were completely used up at 14,000 miles, the pistons were sticking, dragging the pads, I disassembled the caliper and cleaned everything. I replaced the pads with the cheap organic pads, that was 18,000 miles ago. The pads are doing very well, less than half gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The last set of pads died on me at about 9000 miles which to be honest I thought was a bit crap, I bought the bike used so just assumed they had been in there from new. I've always been a fan of EBC pads cause they are relatively cheap and have served me pretty well over the years but this time around it pissed me off a bit, seeing as this set had only done about 2000 miles, there's still life in them yet but I reckon I'll only get about another 1000 miles out of them. I say them but it was the pad on the piston side that had warn badly, the carrier side still isn't that bad. Because the weather was crap the last time I changed the pads I didn't take much notice to see if they had warn unevenly and just binned them. I reckon you were right about sticking slider pins though, they were very dry and didn't move too freely, lubed them up now and see how things go with it.

Anyway thanks again for the advice, next time I'll be a bit more finicky with the maintenance.

Cheers, Jerry
 

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A good test is to raise the bike, pump the brake and spin the rear tire by hand as hard as you can. If you don't get more than one revolution something is sticking, dragging and the brakes are not releasing properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A good test is to raise the bike, pump the brake and spin the rear tire by hand as hard as you can. If you don't get more than one revolution something is sticking, dragging and the brakes are not releasing properly.
I've got the wheel out at the moment to get a tyre fitted, that's not cheap either. When I put it back in tomorrow I'll try that and see what happens. I've ordered new pads, but there's still life in the old ones so I don't want to change them just yet, got to get my moneys worth and all that.

Cheers.
 

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The OEM pads are notorious for wearing out quickly on the back, even with light usage and no obvious caliper/piston problems. I got 6000 miles out of two pairs of them, and I'm light on the back brake. Then I switched to the EBC HH, and they last longer, although I don't have a good memory of how much longer. More than 6000 miles, in any case.
 

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...I cleaned these up and gave them a coat of copper grease to help them along, so I'll see how things go....
Recommend you do NOT use copper grease anywhere on your calipers. The copper is in a grease base and the petroleum component will melt and could splatter onto your pads or rotor. On brake calipers, use only high-temperature silicone grease (like Permatex silicone ceramic brake parts lubricant, for one example).
 

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Recommend you do NOT use copper grease anywhere on your calipers. The copper is in a grease base and the petroleum component will melt and could splatter onto your pads or rotor. On brake calipers, use only high-temperature silicone grease (like Permatex silicone ceramic brake parts lubricant, for one example).
Well interesting. I’ve always used it in the back of callipers to prevent squeal and various moving and anti seize applications. I agree you don’t want ‘loads’ but a light smear has never been an issue..


Chris
 

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Hopefully someone will be able to shed some light on this for me. My 2007 America seems to be getting through rear pads rather quickly, I fitted a set of EBC pads around 2000 miles ago, I looked at them today and one of the pads is looking close to the end of it's life, the other looks fine. There is some scoring on the disc but I wouldn't say its any worse than can be expected. Does anyone know if rapid rear pad wear is normal on an America or is something a miss?

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me with this, Jerry
Hi Jerry
I’m late to the party I guess.
My 146k VFR used these (horrible) sliding calliper Nissin 2 pots. Your calliper has seized or sticking slider pins and bushes and probably stiff pistons. If I neglected to strip and clean mine on an annual basis the same would happen. I rode the thing summer and winter throughout the rain and salt.
Rebuild kits are easy to get hold of and a strip, exercise and clean will reap rewards.
I hope this helps,


Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hi Jerry
I’m late to the party I guess.
My 146k VFR used these (horrible) sliding calliper Nissin 2 pots. Your calliper has seized or sticking slider pins and bushes and probably stiff pistons. If I neglected to strip and clean mine on an annual basis the same would happen. I rode the thing summer and winter throughout the rain and salt.
Rebuild kits are easy to get hold of and a strip, exercise and clean will reap rewards.
I hope this helps,


Chris
Hello Chris, I ride in all sorts of manky weather too, when I took the caliper off it was all pretty cruddy but I've given it a good clean and everything seems to be working quite smoothly now so hopefully I've dodged a bullet this time. I'll take your advice though and keep on top of the maintenance a bit more to save myself trouble in the long run. I was always led to believe copper grease was the thing to use to stop seizures on moving parts as well.

Cheers, Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Recommend you do NOT use copper grease anywhere on your calipers. The copper is in a grease base and the petroleum component will melt and could splatter onto your pads or rotor. On brake calipers, use only high-temperature silicone grease (like Permatex silicone ceramic brake parts lubricant, for one example).
I didn't realise copper grease was petrolium based, but thinking about I suppose it must be. I've only given the pins a light smear. I'll look into getting some of that Permatex that you mentioned.

Cheers, Jerry
 

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Hello Chris, I ride in all sorts of manky weather too, when I took the caliper off it was all pretty cruddy but I've given it a good clean and everything seems to be working quite smoothly now so hopefully I've dodged a bullet this time. I'll take your advice though and keep on top of the maintenance a bit more to save myself trouble in the long run. I was always led to believe copper grease was the thing to use to stop seizures on moving parts as well.

Cheers, Jerry
I guess things change all the time.. You could use red rubber grease in the sliders if you had concerns.
It will all be fine I reckon Jerry.

KR
Chris


Chris
 
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