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Discussion Starter #1
'06 ST
TOR + 20107 tune
Colors should be accurate. They are sitting on a Kodak gray card.



I thought they looked a little cold so I went up one heat grade to Denso IU24A iridium.
I have changed a couple other things and will read these in a while.

As a side note, the 18Nm plug torque per the service manual seemed plenty high. Is this what you are all using?
 

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They look cold to me, but it depends on how old they are, and if you chopped them or just idled her in and shut it off.

For anyone who's interested here's a link to an article by Gordon Jennings with more than you ever wanted to know about spark plugs. The good stuff is near the end of the piece, but it's all worth a read.

http://www.strappe.com/plugs.html
 

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Those plugs don't look bad at all to me. Because plugs are extemely hard to get at, it's hard to get good readings on them. Yimm has a good explanation. When I had bikes that had easy access I would run the bike under load, kill the engine and then pull the plug. Kinda tough to get it right on a Sprint. If you are that concerned, you might want to try a color tune kit.

Please keep in mind you can do more damage with hot plugs than with cold. Colds will just carbon up, hots can cause head damage. The plugs in the pics seem to be so close that even if you do go up or down one heat range the bike will run well, maybe not optimum, but well.
 

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With gas the way it is it's almost impossible to read plugs anymore like the old days with leaded gas where you had the tan colors to judge. You can get oil fowling indications and heavy miss-firing but not much more. Did you compare the pre-readings with the new?

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #5
About 2500 miles.
I idled in and shot off.

Given the above, it looks like my conclusion may not be valid.
Good information, whick is why I asked.
 

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You can still get a good read on a plug, it just has to be virtually new. Combustion still produces carbon, and the carbon will leave a ring all the way down at the base of the insulator. You can see it with a plug light. Here is a link if you want one.

http://www.championsparkplugs.com/more_info.asp?AAIA=&pid=8627

I would suggest reading the Jennings article. He was an extraordinarily good tuner. The article will tell you what to look for, and how to differentiate between a mixture issue and a heat range issue.

As for CLB's question, given the new info, I would say those plugs look really good.. Even if the heat range and mixture is correct, fuel will leave deposits that color the insulator over time. If it was my bike, I'd run 'em without a second thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
On 2006-11-20 19:57, Haddi-Man wrote:

Just curious, what are you doing with a Kodak gray card? Planning to go out and shoot a couple hundred feet of 7231?
No, E100VS!

Actually I never had a gray card when I was shooting that F-stuff.

I use it for setting camera white balance before shooting with odd/mixed lighting. That or sit it in a corner and correct to that reference during raw conversion.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

And back to the topic at hand...
18 Nm per the service manual is too much.

NGK says thread in by hand until the gasket seats, then add 1/2 to 2/3 turn (fresh 10mm plugs and crush washers).
Denso says by hand then 1/4 to 1/2 turn for fresh 10mm plugs.
Both say 1/16 turn for used plugs.

10~15 Nm max. More could cause seal damage or snap the plug nose.
I hate it when I snap my plug nose...

[ This message was edited by: CLB on 2006-11-20 21:42 ]
 
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