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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Rather odd (most of all scary) past few days with my street triple

WARNING. THIS POST IS ON THE LONG SIDE. SEE LAST PARAGRAPH FOR TLDR, ALTHOUGH I WOULD RATHER YOU READ IT ALL LOL. AFTER ALL, I AM THOUSAND WORDS.

Well the past few days have been rather special- my first "technical" scare for my street triple, followed by some more hardware fail which uncovered some operator failure as well.

First things first- not long ago I bit the bullet (spurred by the aftermarket sprocket cover thread) and ordered the LSL front sprocket cover.
All hell broke loose once the cover arrived, as I went ahead installing it.

Just a little background first- long time ago (almost two years ago) I swapped rear sprocket to +3, chain to red aftermarket and front sprocket to -1. Being still new to all this (my triple is a 14, so this was happening in my first year of ownership) I was on the steep part of the learning curve and so not as anal about every single detail of a particular install, so when I swapped the front sprocket, I reused the tab washer as it looked great to my eyes. I did torque the nut holding the sprocket to the output shaft to the correct torque though- I always follow those torque values as they seem to me to be there for a reason.

Anyways, on Sunday I went ahead and removed the stock sprocket cover, and to my horror, both the nut and the tab washer were ****ing gone. Only God knows for how long I rode my bike with the front sprocket held in place by tension in the chain and a flimsy plastic cover. I don't really want to thing too hard of the horror scenarios that could have unfolded if the sprocket decided to fall off the output shaft, and you bet I could easily move it back and forth by hand, which is really scary.

Anyways once I recovered from the initial shock I went to the local ace hardware and bought an M20 x 1.5 nut just to hold the sprocket in place until I get the correct part (it was Sunday so the dealers were all closed). I installed the LSL cover on top of it as I already started on that pathway. Needless to say I did NOT ride my bike that Sunday although it was a wonderful day and it happened to be an anniversary day for me too, and I really wanted to treat my self to a nice ride on my beloved triple. However, in all honesty I could have- the LSL cover literally holds the nut (even the ace hadware generic) in place as the cover is milimeters away from the nut and nut is too big to go through the cover. SO it really secures it in place no matter what. Which, coming from a story like mine, comes to be a HUGE advantage of the LSL cover over the stock and the other brands I am aware of.

The only thing I can think of that could explain losing the nut and washer is me reusing the old tab washer when I installed the new sprocket, which in hindsight was incredibly stupid of me.

Anyways, today dealers were opened and they had both nut and washer in stock, so I jumped in my car and bought them, came back and installed them, then reinstalled the LSL cover and breathed the sigh of relief. AND the great news is that the LSL cover being so minimalistic, from now on I will have a direct visual on the sprocket and nut, just in case there will be a tendency of the story repeating itself in the future.

Now- as I had the bike on the rear stand and it was pretty dirty, I gave the bike a wash, and cleaned to chain, and while doing that I noticed that chain stretched a little from last time I adjusted it and it was on the loose side, so I tightened it a little.

The went for a ride. To my chagrin, my quick shifter was not working any longer. Unfortunately there are at least 3 reasons I could think about for it, and I am not sure which one is the real one. First, when I took the stock sprocket cover off, I temporarily disconnected the quickshifter along with shifter arm, then after cover was off I reinstalled them back. One possibility is that in the process I somehow "damaged" the shifter (the pull sensor part) so that now it does not cut fuelling as it is supposed to be. Hard to believe but possible.
Second explanation, and the more likely, is me tightening the chain. So now the transmission is loaded for a much greater percent of time, whereas before, a loose chain allowed for the transmission to be unloaded much easier and for longer once fuelling was cut by the quickshifter.
Thirdly, the front sprocket being "loose" before due to nut being gone could have played a role too- I don't really see how, but possible.

To top off an already eventful last few days, I realized that I forgot how to upshift normally, with a clutch. I also realized how much I actually loved the quickshifter. I did not go for a very long ride, but even towards the end, I found myself winding the throttle up and go directly for the shifter- after so many thousand times of clutchless upshifts, my brain got so unused to using the clutch that it caught me by surprise, having to actually reach for it. It made for very awkward shifting lol. I know in a few days I will get used back to it but I really want to troubleshoot my quickshifter asap though. I do have a question about that and I will start a new thread on it as this already reached gargantuan lengths, as fit to somebody with my screen name lol.

Anyways this is my rather unusual story of the past few days- for Ramesses (and Ramesses-like fellow forumers)- TLDR morale I guess is DO NOT REUSE THE TAB WASHER WHEN YOU CHANGE FRONT SPROCKET.
 

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Good catch, and a good reminder of how important it is to periodically inspect your bike.

Also, you can upshift without the clutch even without one of those fancy quick shifters. In fact, between my other bike with one and my STR without, I kind of prefer the latter.
 

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Agree with MacBandit. And the washer is not there to hold the nut in place but just to provide security in case it loosens.

A helpful tip (sorry if obvious) for any critical bolts/nuts you're tightening. Sometimes when you first torque it to spec, the joint has insufficient clamp load for a variety of reasons (rust, binding, etc), so it can be helpful to take the bike for a little spin around the block to let things settle, then re-torque to spec again. For suspension linkage, I'll just up and down on the bike a few times. I've learned this lesson the hard way myself - or almost the hard way. Never done that on a sprocket nut, but it couldn't hurt. At the very least, you'll learn if it's loose or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Agree with MacBandit. And the washer is not there to hold the nut in place but just to provide security in case it loosens.

A helpful tip (sorry if obvious) for any critical bolts/nuts you're tightening. Sometimes when you first torque it to spec, the joint has insufficient clamp load for a variety of reasons (rust, binding, etc), so it can be helpful to take the bike for a little spin around the block to let things settle, then re-torque to spec again. For suspension linkage, I'll just up and down on the bike a few times. I've learned this lesson the hard way myself - or almost the hard way. Never done that on a sprocket nut, but it couldn't hurt. At the very least, you'll learn if it's loose or not.

Great point and something I haven't thought of yet. Will incorporate it in my future maintenance projects.
 
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