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1976 Triumph T140V and 2002 Triumph Thunderbird 900
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2002 Tbird suspension was lowered by the previous owner and I have the shorter dog bones to put the bike back to factory settings, I need to do this as I fitted a centre stand and the bike is to low to lift on the stand. If I lift the bike with hydraulic lift and drop the stand then lower the bike the back wheel is 3 inches, 75mm off the ground.
What does it entail Fitting the lower dog bones back and raising the back end, I also think the front suspension will also need altering.
John.
 

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My 2002 Tbird suspension was lowered by the previous owner and I have the shorter dog bones to put the bike back to factory settings, I need to do this as I fitted a centre stand and the bike is to low to lift on the stand. If I lift the bike with hydraulic lift and drop the stand then lower the bike the back wheel is 3 inches, 75mm off the ground.
What does it entail Fitting the lower dog bones back and raising the back end, I also think the front suspension will also need altering.
John.
Yes John, I have done it a few times .I installed a set that were supposed to lower bike 4cm,it was more like 4 inches, purchased and installed a set claimed to lower bike by 2.5 cm, still too low, so I put back the originals .I will attempt to take some photos to help illustrate. It might take a couple of days, someone else might come forward before I get a chance. From memory, you need to remove swingarm pivot, the attachment to the rear shock, and one other point.
Clearly you need a trolley jack to raise the bike ,placed under the sump, then tie down the front of the bike to ensure the rear wheel clears the floor. I also used tie down straps to attach to each side of rear, anchored to each side of shed to make sure the bike didn't topple. I did the whole operation myself, much easier if you have an assistant.
 

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1976 Triumph T140V and 2002 Triumph Thunderbird 900
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87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Dave much appreciated.
John.
 

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John,I have attached two photos,one of my bike,and one of a page from the Haynes manual.The photo of my bike is from the left side of the bike,and the manual shows the right side.The photo of the bike shows where the dog bone attaches to the middle of the suspension linkage(left side of photo),and the middle of the photo shows where the shock attaches to the suspension linkage.What the photo does not show is where the other end of the dog bone attaches to the swing arm(upper right of photo). My suggestion of using a trolley jack is what I did because I did not have a shed with a load -bearing structure.If you have such a luxury,I believe the easiest way to take all weight off the back wheel would be to throw a couple of ratchet tie-down straps over the rafters/beams,whatever is the correct terminology,and raise the bike on an even keel. From memory,I think I then proceeded to remove the nuts from the swing-arm end first,then the shock,and the other end of the dog bone last.I don't think the order is critical,but when re-installing the originals,the order does have some importance.I recall having an issue getting a spanner /socket within a confined space,and I am not certain,but I believe that when I first tried,I attached both ends of the dog bone first,and then had trouble tightening the nut attaching the shock to the suspension linkage,whereas it was much easier to tighten this nut when one end of the dog bone was swinging free. Sorry if my instructions are unclear,it is getting late here,and I have had a long day.Give it a go,let me know if you run into trouble. Dave.
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1976 Triumph T140V and 2002 Triumph Thunderbird 900
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87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you again Dave, I will look at this when I can use spanner’s again as I recently cut my right hand quite badly between the thumb and first finger and it’s healing quite nicely.
John.
 

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I raised the rear on my TB to give some extra height when 2-up as it would sometimes bottom out. (I also fitted a heavier spring from a 1400GTR) I found that with the bike on the centre stand you need no jacks, or ropes & pulleys to change the dog bones - just a length of wood under the tyre which you use to raise or lower the wheel to slip the bolts out & in. I also fitted a side stand foot pad to reduce the lean with the higher suspension.
 

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1976 Triumph T140V and 2002 Triumph Thunderbird 900
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87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I raised the rear on my TB to give some extra height when 2-up as it would sometimes bottom out. (I also fitted a heavier spring from a 1400GTR) I found that with the bike on the centre stand you need no jacks, or ropes & pulleys to change the dog bones - just a length of wood under the tyre which you use to raise or lower the wheel to slip the bolts out & in. I also fitted a side stand foot pad to reduce the lean with the higher suspension.
Thanks Freddy that’s great to know.

John.
 
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