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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just over 6' tall and have always found the old Bonnies a little short for my liking. Maybe its because Ive ridden a lot of dirt bikes in the past and am used to the high seats.

Anyway, is it possibe to raise a stock framed 1960s bonnie an inch or tow? E.g. longer rear spings and longer front forks? Of course the swing arm would now not be parralel with ground.
Would it look odd? Mess up handling? Anyone done something like this?
Is there a deeper version tire that could add half an inch?
Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, dont fancy those oil in frame ones. Prefer the 60s look for sure. What was main difference that made them taller- larger frame, or thicker seat padding?
 

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Hi, Kev,

How about just raising the saddle by putting a pad on it, or have it re-done with extra padding in it. That way you would gain a bit more room on the footpegs as well.

From the vast wasteland of a mind of the "village idiot": Jim
 

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Overlength fork tubes, unless custom made to your spec, would likely have it looking like a chopper. Stiffer springs will keep the profile taller (less "sag"), but at the expense of comfort.

Longer shocks are very easy. Start by simply setting the preload stiffer (again at the expense of comfort).

Taller profile tire in the rear is easy; in the front, not so easy if you are using a stock front fender.

Seat padding is easy.
 

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Get yourself a Norton N15CS (or Matchless G15CS).

My buddy (about 6'4") sat on my N15 and thought it was perfect for his height.
 

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Riding or Standing Still??

Kev,

You never mentioned if you were not comfy moving or standing still. If it is just a matter of the bike feeling funny because you are too close to the ground when you are riding, I'd suggest you learn to get used to it. If the problem is you are not comforable because the pegs are too close to the seat and you feel cramped, then that's a different animal. You can monkey all day with the shocks and the forks and never put a dent in the distance between the seat and the pegs. But I'm sure you know that.

Plus, I would not suggest you alter the suspension on the bike, other than to tune it to your specific weight and riding style.

Regardless of your complaint, I suggest you attack the seat. It will get you some added leg room, maintain the integrity of the suspension geometry and be relatively inexpensive.

First, the problem could be the foam in your seat is all tired out due to age and that is why you are sitting low. If that is the case, I suggest you splice in a new piece of rebond, a high density foam, into the OEM foam. I recently did this on my T140V because I was sitting on the seat pan. I sliced a 1 inch thick piece from the riders portion of the OEM foam bottom and spliced in a new piece of rebond. No more sore buns.

If your seat foam is completely shot, you could splice in twice as much as I did, or just slice off the top of the OEM foam and glue it to a new thick or built up piece of rebond. I suggest this method because it maintains the original shape of the foam so your seatcover will fill out properly.

Now if your OEM foam is still resilient, then I would suggest you simply glue a 1 inch piece of rebond to the bottom of your OEM foam. This will require you to buy a new seat cover because the old one will be worn or possibly cut where it went around the seat pan. But you can pick one up for $50. The rebond and a can of spray adhesive will cost you no more than $10.

For cutting the foam, I suggest a band saw. If one is not available, the second choice is an electric carving knife, which you will need anyway. You know, the kind with reciprocating blades. It will slice and shape foam without distorting it during the cutting process. I used an electric carving knife to cut that slice you see in the pictures, from the bottom of my OEM foam. The carving knife is also good for making rounded cuts. I've shown friends how to do upholstery work on bikes and as a demo I cut my name out of a piece of 4 inch foam with the knife. The secret is to not force it thru the foam. It's a great tool for foam. Good luck.

I just tried to upload the pictures ,but no go. So I attached a sketch instead. If you want to see the pics, PM me. Maybe I'll try again later and delete this line if I get them uploaded.
regards,
Rob
 
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