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Discussion Starter #1


Posted earlier in wrong section. Just bought this today for $1,100 from original owner not sure what model this is other than a twin. Not original forks or handlebars but everything else is genuine. Turns over but electrics are shot. Plan to strip down and either bring back to all genuine or go another route and do a custom. It's a 1968 model 650. Nice winter project. Can anyone easily I'd the model?
 

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I can't tell what it is, but if you look on the LHS by the headstock, the frame number should be there, (unless it's covered in bondo)

This should match the engine number that's at the base of the cylinders on the LHS

You should have a model number first
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What is the best approach? I was looking at a chopper kit but then you lose the frame number association and it is not cheap. So I'll keep original and I'm thinking I'll powder coat the frame and wheels in some fancy non-genuine colour.

I've done some engine work many moons ago, have some decent tools but perhaps not the specific ones for the triumph. Is it better to take apart the engine and part out any work that needs to be done or to send the complete engine and transmission out to a shop? Any idea of the cost to overhaul these? Worst case, best case range?

I have my own shot blast equip but these parts look like they need some serious tlc. Time wise I'm in no hurry and looking for something to do over the winter but I don't want to get in over my head either
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Got the bike today and it is a tr6r. The owner said it was a t100 is that the same thing? Stripped e bike down to frame and engine. Two problems tho, can't get exhaust off, both seem stuck to the heads, thinking to cut the pipes and wrestle with it when on the bench. Also the front yokes won't budge, I need to have the lower yoke go down to take off the forks but they don't budge. Again thinking of cutting them off and wrestling on the bench. The forks and exhaust pipes are not in good shape and I won't reuse anyway.
 

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I've done some engine work many moons ago, have some decent tools but perhaps not the specific ones for the triumph. Is it better to take apart the engine and part out any work that needs to be done or to send the complete engine and transmission out to a shop? Any idea of the cost to overhaul these? Worst case, best case range?
Is there a specific reason why you are taking the engine/transmission apart?

P.S. If you make a chopper the bike will have less value than if you restore to stock.

P.S.S. Try spraying in some ATF/Kerosene mix and letting sit for pipes and forks or some heat. Try not to cut anything if you can. You would be surprised how salvageable/valuable 40 year old Triumph parts can be.
 

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It's much easier to remove stuck parts from the bike while they are still attached to hundreds of pounds of ballast.

And, as T120RV said, you'd be suprised...

Oh, if you are looking at a parts diagram AND a shop manual, disassembly (and reassembly) are much easier.
 

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I read your post about the forks to indicate that you're trying to remove the lower yoke ?
(nice that you don't use "triple tree")

You should remove the top yoke and this will allow the rest of the forks to be dropped out.

as GPZ says, get a parts book and workshop manual. Also get a set of the correct tools

In the UK £50 would get you a full set of spanners and sockets plus.

Don't cut anything. Even if you don't want the yokes, someone will pay good money for them -you can use that cash for your project. Or keep the unwanted parts as selling them with the modified bike will add to it's value and allow restoration.

The motto is

"never get rid of anything, your ebay purchase will always be more knackered than the bit that you took off, and twice as expensive."
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks I did remove top yoke and it came off that way. I have the manual at work and ordered the cd on engine rebuilding. It's a genuine barn find complete with mouse nest in side panel. I have everything off except the engine and exhaust. I am looking at a very dirty rusted engine covered in muck. So I'm trying to figure out what to do next, all casings will need cleaning and polishing so I assumed I would be taking everything apart to do this. Then I would check the pistons, sleeves, etc Not decided if I should do this or send out to a shop to overhaul? I have most tools but Murphy,s law says I won't have the correct ones when needed. I think next ill clean the engine, remove from frame and start stripping down.
The bike had 20k miles on it from original owner.
 

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The lower yoke "pinch" slots are virtually useless. You need to carefully drive a thin wedge into the groove, with one or two light hammer whacks, that's all you'll get. Then spray penetrant in the joint and turn the stanchion tubes with a RUBBER REINFORCED STRAP WRENCH (Sears/Craftsman and others) That will prevent further damage. Again if you removed the yoke stem nut, reinstall it, and use the ballast of the bike to remove the tubes from the lower yoke.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks. I discovered a bigger problem. Above the sprocket there is a large chunk of casing missing. I can post a pic tomorrow but I'm concerned what can be done about this. It's on this main casing. It looks like maybe the chain came off at some point and took a large chunk leaving a hole about four inches long and an inch or two high. I don't have the missing chunk so I'm anxious to know if this can be repaired.

 

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yes that can be repaired.

The good news is that it's not a part that holds oil in, so anything that covers it up will do.
from some of the repairs done by guys on here (with greater skills than I) it should be possible to make good and pretty undetectable
 

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I think next ill clean the engine, remove from frame and start stripping down.
You'll find it's easier to start stripping the engine,while it's still in the frame.If you engage top gear and apply the rear brake,you can undo some difficult nuts.
After removing the primary chain cover and timing cover,put a hoseclip or similar on the idler timing wheel shaft so you don't immediately lose cam-timing position if the idler wheel falls off.
*Remove the nuts at both sides of the crank.
*Dismantle the clutch next and udo the mainshaft nut.
*Next undo the other mainshaft nut in the gearbox end.
*With the clutch and primary chain out,decide whether you need to remove/replace the gearbox sprocket.If so,now would be a good time to undo the sprocket nut.

You can undo most other things easily with the engine out of the frame.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)




I got too impatient waiting for my CD by Herbie Hancock so took out the engine, apparently not the best idea (as pointed out above) as I will have to split the casing to repair the hole. I did order the aluminum welding rods as I think they will work.

The pics are of my head and cylinders. They look pretty good altho a lot of carbon. What is recommended here? New valves as a matter of course or not necessary? Same with piston rings, should they be replaced and cylinder honed or only if there is excessive play? I am going to shot blast the head and block to get rid of dirt, manual had an interesting bit about leaving a ring of carbon on the piston? It will be difficult to do so shotblasting (using walnut shells). Compared to some projects here my engine is looking surprisingly good.
 

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The pics are of my head and cylinders. They look pretty good altho a lot of carbon. What is recommended here? New valves as a matter of course or not necessary? Same with piston rings, should they be replaced and cylinder honed or only if there is excessive play? I am going to shot blast the head and block to get rid of dirt
Measure the valve spring seated loads,before you take valves out of the head.Use bathroom scales to measure the spring load.
Take out the valves before you blast the head.I prefer soda blast,but walnut shells should be OK.Don't mix up any springs,collars and valves or collets;make sure you can put them back in the same place if necessary.
Hope you didn't mix up any tappets.If they don't go back in the same position and direction,they need to be re-ground and re-bedded.There is a procedure for this,and slow cranking/idling will cause damage even after the re-grind.

Plug up any threads with old bolts when you blast the head.Make sure to blast the guides clean in the ports.Any carbon here will ruin the head if you need to remove guides.
Measure valve stems and the amount of wear at the top and bottom of guides,then decide what to replace.At 0.008" clearance top or bottom,it's worth replacing guides.
If the guides and valves are good,still do a valve job:cut seats and re-grind valve faces,especially the top of the valve stem.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
When you say tappets are you referring to the pushrods or the rockers? I have taken the pushrods out so hopefully you are referring to the rockers! I wasn't planning on taking apart the rocker boxes.
 

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In the Uk, when we talk about "doing the tappets," we are referring to the valve clearances.
But this is the wrong terminology.

What Mr Pete is talking about are the cam lifters/followers/tappets.

They are the hammer like parts at the base of the cylinder and are converting the round and round action of the cams to up and down of the pushrods.

If they don't go back wiith the same wear pattern in the cams, you're starting to run them in again
 
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