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I currently have my Sprint GT in pieces doing all the maintenance I can before riding season starts here in Canada, eh, I mean, Northern New England. Just about 14k miles and the rear hub bearings weren't loose or making noise but I decided to replace them all for piece of mind and to prevent damage to the axle, there was barely any grease in the needle bearing and it was very gritty. Upon inspection of the old parts, I'm a little concerned with the outboard roller bearing on the left side of the axle, the "burn" marks on both the axle and bearing inner surface lead me to believe that the axle is turning inside the inner surface at times rather than the inside bearing surface turning with the axle. The axle surface cleaned up nicely and there are no gouges or rough spots but I'm wondering if I should use some kind of Loctite bearing retaining compound. Anyone ever used it before? I'm concerned if I do use it, it's going to be a PITA to get the axle out for future maintenance but at the same time I don't want the axle spinning inside the bearing surface again.

Inside bearing surface for outer left axle side ball bearing:
IMG_20180329_174958362

Axle surface for outer left side axle ball bearing;
IMG_20180329_174802237

Loctite bearing retaining compound:


Thanks in advance for your advice and help.





On a side note, checking the valves, they were all within spec and after my K&N oil filter failure I'm very pleased with how the factory recommended Castrol 4T oil protected my engine despite losing most of my oil and pressure on a ride, cam lobes looked perfect, everything was very clean:
IMG_20180329_201846309
 

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Wow, really?!?! Triumph is still trying to save 7¢/motorcycle by not using enough grease on the bearings? I seriously hope someone sues the living **** out of them over this; it's asinine.

Castrol is the most co-marketed oil Triumph currently sells. Nothing necessarily wrong with it, but it was chosen by the marketing people rather than the engineering people and is recommended retroactively for everything they've ever sold.

K&N is just crap.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Kit, tell us how you really feel about K&N filters.😉

I lost a good two weeks of riding over worry about dirt in throttle bodies source. Seems the rubber liner of my filter was deformed leaving factory and could not hold the correct seal allowing anything smaller than an eighth inch to enter box. Dealer gave me my money back but having to clean everything twice was a pain.
 

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If the bearing is supposed to be a slide fit i would not use loctite on it unless the axel is worn and you have no other options. If you loctite a bearing that is manufactured as a slide fit to enable assembly and disassembly you will have issues when you need to strip it down again.
If there is no wear on the axle and it is just a bit blue then it more than likely got hot at some stage. I would just fit a new bearing.

That said i have access to a full machine shop and would messure the axle to make sure it is not worn.

If the axle is worn you can get it repaired. We repair parts like this on a daily basis using thermal arc spray process which is cost effective and with the right build up material the repair will be better than a new part.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
If the bearing is supposed to be a slide fit i would not use loctite on it unless the axel is worn and you have no other options. If you loctite a bearing that is manufactured as a slide fit to enable assembly and disassembly you will have issues when you need to strip it down again.
If there is no wear on the axle and it is just a bit blue then it more than likely got hot at some stage. I would just fit a new bearing.

That said i have access to a full machine shop and would messure the axle to make sure it is not worn.

If the axle is worn you can get it repaired. We repair parts like this on a daily basis using thermal arc spray process which is cost effective and with the right build up material the repair will be better than a new part.
Thanks for the quick replies, I think you're right about the loctite. I don't have a micrometer but I guess I'll pick one up and see what the axle measures in at. Based on how it feels and visuals I'd be really surprised if it was worn down.

I understand that the Castrol is recommended by the marketing folks but the proof is there that it did a very fine job protecting my engine internals despite having no oil or pressure thanks to that POS K&N oil filter. Kit, don't get me started on Triumph, between saving a few pennies on grease and then charging arm and a leg for what should be no more than a twenty dollar needle bearing, ridiculous. I've contacted every major bearing manufacturer directly and that machined needle bearing is a Triumph protected part so no aftermarket options. $80 for an inferior product is a joke!

As for K&N, it was their oil filter that failed on me, the filter cracked open where the spot welds are on the removal nut while I was riding, left a 5 mile oil trail on the road and the entire rear of my motorcycle to include the tire soaked in oil. How I did not go down or damage the engine/trans is a miracle.
 

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I'm a little concerned with the outboard roller bearing on the left side of the axle, the "burn" marks on both the axle and bearing inner surface lead me to believe that the axle is turning inside the inner surface at times rather than the inside bearing surface turning with the axle.
For the axle to turn inside the bearing then it would mean that the bearing was completely seized or needed so much force to spin that it was easier for the axle to rotate inside the bearing. Since the damage doesn't appear to be severe then it's also possible that some intermittent sticking of the bearing caused it. The fact that only the outer bearing has left marks rules out side-to-side movement - which you would have probably noticed anyway!

Now that you've replace that double bearing it should be spinning free and easy so the problem should be solved.

The axle surface cleaned up nicely and there are no gouges or rough spots but I'm wondering if I should use some kind of Loctite bearing retaining compound. Anyone ever used it before? I'm concerned if I do use it, it's going to be a PITA to get the axle out for future maintenance but at the same time I don't want the axle spinning inside the bearing surface again.
I think the new bearings will eliminate any movement so Loctite shouldn't be necessary. However, if you still have concerns you could use the tiniest smear. By that I mean a single drop smeared around the axle surface before you slide the axle in. That won't be enough to lock the axle in place but should prevent any "fretting" of the bearing against the axle.
 

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I am a new owner of a 2011 GT. It has around 19,000 miles and the previous owner doesn't know if the 12,000 mile maintenance was ever performed (other than oil change). So, I'm going through that now myself, one item at a time.

My question is, the Haynes manual says that rear wheel bearing lubrication is NOT required for the GT model. Also, when reviewing the parts diagram on Bike Bandit, it appears that the needle bearing was changed out on the GT to be a sealed bearing--which would fit with the Haynes manual of saying it doesn't need to be lubricated. However, the owners manual clearly states to lubricate the rear wheel at 12,000 mile intervals. Which one is correct?

I really don't want to dig into the rear wheel and get everything disassembled, only to find out all the bearings are sealed and there is nothing that needs to be done. Also, the section in the Haynes manual on the rear hub disassembly says that the bearings are press-fit and require special tools for removal and installation. Therefore, if the bearings are worn and need to be renewed, Triumph advises to replace the entire hub assembly as a unit with the bearings already installed. I have removed and reinstalled wheel bearings in the past and know it can be done with caution, but, the potential to damage otherwise good bearings is also a real possibility. And, the "Triumph" statement above appears to contradict the 12,000 mile lubrication requirement--if the hub is to be replaced as a unit in liue of disassembling, then why would they say it needs to be lubricated.

Does anyone have any insight on this?
 

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Bear in mind I'm an old 955 guy - but if the rear axle arrangement is similar, it's not a big deal to take it apart. And then you will know what your situation is.

The 955/1050 ST rear axle bearings are a CRITICAL check, especially the first at 12K. The second most critical is the first valve check, again at 12K.
 

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@NZuercher: This is a load of bull.....t that you read. The ONLY difference between the 955 and the GT is that the needle bearing is including the seals on the GT while it's separated parts on the 955. So there is no reason why you shouldn't do the same service for the GT.

I just completed the second one for mine (GT) using the grease recommended by Triumph. The grease if more sticky than the ordinary one and makes strings as for the chain-saw chain oil.
I remove all the old grease w/ turpentine and a round paint brush putting the hub vertically in a pan changing the turpentine often until the turpentine stays clean. Then I put grease thoroughly including in the gap between the roller bearings and the needle bearing.

That doesn't require to remove the bearing from the hub.
Surprisingly the extra grease in the middle goes away between two services meaning it's getting hot and flowing through the bearing (I guess).
 

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For sure that's bs. You will really want to keep that rear hub bearing serviced. Hardest part for me on these SSSA Triumphs is the large c-clip removal/installation. I bought some ratcheting c-clip pliers (bigguns at that), and it makes the job generate approximately 47.3% fewer cuss words. As Fred said, clean with a soft bristle brush, NOT anything metal or you can damage things. I'm finding this on my Daytona 955i. Someone scored the hell out of my hub bearing parts using a wire brush and I'm having to source replacements.

Don't forget the swingarm bearing lubrication. Wait too long and they are a right B to get done.
 

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Thanks! So the moral is don't believe everything in the manual. If something doesn't make sense, ask those who have already done it.

Pics from the manual are below. Note the manual is shared with the Speed Triple, Tiger, Sprint ST, and Sprint GT.

719526
719527
 

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Ah ah ah. Renew the hub assembly when the bearings are shot :ROFLMAO:!!!!!!!!!!
Better buy a press. I bought one for the cars and it costs 200€.
Lets see the price of the hub: $301.94
as we are in it let's change the axle 🤣: $519.49

At more than 40kkm I still have 0 play in the rear hub. Just wondering whether I should have changed the left side roller bearing regarding what Champ87 found in its own one.
 

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Change plugs at 12K!? Why? They're Iridium, and probably will last the life of the bike!

The front wheel bearings are sealed - good luck lubing them!

So if the rear bearings are 'iffy', you buy a new wheel? (Unless they made a radical design change, there is no 'hub assembly')

Where did you get that article?
 
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