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In the four wheel world it's called heel and toe, blipping your throttle to match the rev's for the trans while under braking so your in the proper gear while your in and exiting the corner. Makes for a smooth transition, it's easy on the trans, and prevents rear wheel lock up. I'm a x four wheel racer and high speed driving instructor and I've been driving like that for many years. When I returned to two wheels I have yet to master this technique. Right now I'm blipping throttle and downshifting before braking, it's OK for the street however I hope to do some track days in the next year or so and I really would like to do it correctly.
Last year I was at Mid Ohio for Vintage Days and the following weekends Super Bike Race. During the week between the two they had some track days. I talked to a few of the riders who seemed to be pretty fast and they said they you don't need to do it. When the Pro's showed up they were allowed to participate in the last track day and to say they smoked the guys I was watching the day before was a understatement. It was clear that the pro's were matching rev's under maximum braking. They rode and braked deeper into the corner and powered out sooner there by lowering there track times considerably. Oh, and the sound of those guys braking and downshifting was glorious to say the least.
Does anyone here have any tips or tricks for this? I just can't get my right hand to pull back on the brake and twist the throttle at the same time.
 

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I'm very familiar with rev-matching in cars, I am not doing it on the bike so much when doing spirited riding, but I do it in lower gears, usually 2nd-1st at low speeds to keep the bike settled and smooth out the power. For me, I use only my index or index + middle fingers on the brake lever, and use the palm of your hand to roll the throttle slightly. I am trying to figure out how I do it because I know I do it but I just 'feel' it. :) You may want to try adjusting your front brake lever closer to your handgrip, so you don't have to move your hand as much to reach over and engage it.
As with anything else, don't practice this in heavy traffic or somewhere where you should be concentrating. :)
 

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Slip slip slippin'

My Ducati 916 has a slipper clutch. While matching revs to speed in a particular gear is most desirable, having a slipper clutch allows for hard down shifts at high RPM without locking up the rear wheel when you are not spot on. The clutch "slips" a little under high load, not allowing the wheel to lock up. Most AMA or Moto GP guys have this type of clutch. Works great too. :)
 

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I do it all the time, with practise you can grab big hand fulls of throttle and brake at the same time. It just takes practise like everything else.

It is particularly useful when coming up to a corner after being at full noise on a straight.

It can be done and it is not that hard once you have mastered it.

The Sprint does not have a slipper clutch because it does not need one, now big Vee Twins do need them, like the duke 1098.

Cheers,
DaveM:cool:
 

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For me, I use only my index or index + middle fingers on the brake lever, and use the palm of your hand to roll the throttle slightly. I am trying to figure out how I do it because I know I do it but I just 'feel' it. :) You may want to try adjusting your front brake lever closer to your handgrip, so you don't have to move your hand as much to reach over and engage it.
he pretty much explained it right there. two fingers for the brake, and set up the lever to your size hand/finger length. I kind of favor the right, outer side of my palm to roll the throttle. that way you have leverage to push/steer right too. it really is kind of hard to explain. it is more of a "feel" like he said above. dont sweat doing it over night, just practice until it becomes second nature, just like heel/toe is for you in a cage. although for street riding, it is hard to beat the triple. even if you are in too high of a gear the torque is far better than being too high a cog on a 600 4cyl, yet if you do go in a little rev happy, you have extended rpm to play with over a traditional twin. (cept the high revving exotic twins) which I lust over a 1098S tricolor , but Im too fat, old and broken up to be riding one :mad: Good luck, and be safe with it. OBTW, make sure you adjust the extra slack out of your throttle cable too. most sprints seem to come from the showroom floor with a little too much slack, makes for a scary transition. Ride safe. Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies. Was practicing it today......I need lot's of it. I really haven't noticed it before until Bill mentioned about the slack in the throttle cable. Need to adjust that as that will make it much easier.
 

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once you get the slack out of the cable, you might want to work on "trail braking". it's much easier on lefts than rights (for me). that involves draggin the rear brake just a bit, while still on the throttle slightly (maintenance throttle) . it will take ALL of the driveline lash out, and makes for the smoothest exit out from the apex. It all sounds good on paper, Yet I'm probably slower than most of the people on this board. And know that "reading, understanding, and ability to apply theories" are all different things :D. If you are pretty new to sport bikes in general. Pick up a copy of Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch. it is pretty informative. you might learn something from it, even if you are not new to motorcycles. good luck
 

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With a slipper clutch you have cams between the inner and outer basket. When the rear wheel is trying to drive the engine on a downshift the cams start to lift the pressure plate against the springs allowing the clutch to slip.
Some can even work the other way as well to pull the plates together under power to reduce slip when it's not wanted.
 

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Enhancing the engine is a buttery smooth six-speed gearbox and clutch fitted with an anti-backlash gear.

Is this similar to a slipper clutch?
They lied about the buttery smooth gearbox too...

I love my 08 Sprint, but buttery the trans is not... well maybe frozen butter with ready-mix added.

I can probably almost shift my Kawasaki transmissions using my tongue.

We're talking seamless Kawi *snick* versus Triumph *clunk*, with a ghost neutral between 4th-5th unless I really throw the arch into the shifter.

I'm hoping the Sprint tranny will smooth out over a few thousand miles.
 

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With a slipper clutch you have cams between the inner and outer basket. When the rear wheel is trying to drive the engine on a downshift the cams start to lift the pressure plate against the springs allowing the clutch to slip.
Some can even work the other way as well to pull the plates together under power to reduce slip when it's not wanted.
So, what does the anti-backlash gear do?
 

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I love my 08 Sprint, but buttery the trans is not... well maybe frozen butter with ready-mix added.
LOL, I agree! It can be quite clunky!

I can probably almost shift my Kawasaki transmissions using my tongue.
My Ninja 250 shifted smooth, except into 1st, but I also got a lot of false neutrals. I rarely get a false neutral with my Sprint.

I'm hoping the Sprint tranny will smooth out over a few thousand miles.
I have 6,200 miles on my '08, but it doesn't seem any different.
 

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They lied about the buttery smooth gearbox too...

I love my 08 Sprint, but buttery the trans is not... well maybe frozen butter with ready-mix added.

I can probably almost shift my Kawasaki transmissions using my tongue.

We're talking seamless Kawi *snick* versus Triumph *clunk*, with a ghost neutral between 4th-5th unless I really throw the arch into the shifter.

I'm hoping the Sprint tranny will smooth out over a few thousand miles.
Mine got a lot better around 5-6K and stil getting smoother...
 

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So, what does the anti-backlash gear do?
It's supposed to reduce the drivetrain slack when getting back on the power from the over run.

On the earlier Sprints without the antibacklash gear that's why you'll see people recommending using some rear brake and throttle together when cornering so that as you exit and power out you don't get the snatch as the slack takes up.

And as for false neutrals my 05's never found one yet, it can be a bit stiff on the downshift when it's very hot, but even that was improved with the heavier grade oil.
 

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I just can't get my right hand to pull back on the brake and twist the throttle at the same time.
Seems, your brake level is not adjusted to your hand and riding position. If you can't get a grip on both, try moving the brake lever a bit up (just a little bit) and try again.
If you move it up to far, you will have to weak (and inconsistent) braking, though.
Remember about braking into the corner: First brake slightly to get the front grip and then apply more brake gradually. Keep the weight to the rear, use you legs to keep you on the bike (not your hands, you might get arm-pump); this will keep you center of gravity lower and further to the back of the bike.
When you reach the turn-in, release the brake gradually whilst turning onto the apex. Don't just let go of the brake: Your will loose front grip and might loose the bike (and yourself).
Remember all the time where your eyes should be: where you wanna go.

*Many* books have been written on this. Go buy one and try it out for yourself. I personally recomend: "Performance riding techniques", ISBN 978 1 84425 343 2

Race on, dude..
 

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Thanks for the replies. Was practicing it today......I need lot's of it. I really haven't noticed it before until Bill mentioned about the slack in the throttle cable. Need to adjust that as that will make it much easier.
Yup, but you will loose topspeed and accel too, see ?
 

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I have taken the Jason Pridmore Star School and he was not a fan of rev matching with a throttle blip on the downshift. He teaches early preparation for the corner then rapid downshifting while slipping the clutch to ease the transition between gears. Not easy to do and prone to lock up the rear wheel if you miss it. I still like blipping the throttle to downshift because it is just like driving my Mini Cooper and it sounds cool.
 
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