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Hi all,
I'm getting some oil inside my timing cover on my -54 T100 pre unit. I took the morgo oil pump off and figured I'll replace the gasket behind it. But now that I have it all torn down, is there a way of testing/checking the actual pump for leaks? Are they prone to leak?
 

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Hi MrLantz, Study the shop manual for pump testing. It will make sense once you start to test it. You'll see how you can pull plunger & it will want to suck back. I've tested many. They are not prone to leak, but they can due to wear or dirt or other problem in check valve. Plungers can have a surprising amount of small scratches on sides, but still pump fine. Test only one side at a time.

Play around with the pump & you'll soon see how it works & how easy the test is. Like everything a little practice makes perfect.

I like to take margarine tub or the like. Put enough motor oil in it to submerge pump fully while you can work piston.
Submerge pump & push piston up/down to bleed all air. This also can help flush valves to a degree. You'll feel how you have to push harder to open check valve. With other fingers you can feel a tiny spurt of oil come out the lower bores. You can fill bores with oil can, but it's a little harder in my mind.

Once you have pump bled, remove from oil, quickly wipe oil from outlet (bottom) bore. Place finger tightly over upper bore (inlet). I hold pump rather horizontal & such light reflects on the oil in outlet bore. With finger tightly over inlet bore with other hand pull out on plunger to make suction inside pump. You'll feel it want to pull back, but just hold it against the suction. Observe oil in outlet bore. Good pump will hold level a very long time. 15+ seconds or more. A leaking pump you'll see oil level drop in the bore. I've only seen a few bad pumps of all I've tested. On one that was wet sumping, the oil dropped in a few seconds. It was obviously failing the test. Check ball seat was worn oval & no amount of ball seating cured it. I won't try to save bad pumps.

Often a failed test shows a piece of rubber from oil line or gasket chunk. I hold pump in vise with hardwood blocks to unscrew check valves. They can be very tight. I then take apart over paper towel & try to find/see anything that could be stuck in vavle. Clean & retest. If you don't find anything, clean & retest anyway, but these ones scare me.

One pump in my possession is high miles & worn. Slightly leaking. At check valve. Will hold for 15 seconds, but just barely. Has wear on bores & plungers. Due to this pump was replaced. Oil pressure tested before & after. New pump did not change hot oil pressure at idle. Was repro Triumph pump.

Morgo has slightly larger pistons & may have higher intake cutoff. In any case has more volume than original. I'll use Morgo when my pump is worn out due to those reasons. Morgo has good reputation, while many repros have dubious reputation.

In my experience if a pump tests perfectly doing say 5 tests in a row it's a good pump. The gasket may have been leaking or something else wrong, but it's not the pump.

Don't squirt yourself in the eye!!

Don
 

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Hi Daniel,
I think you have the right idea replacing the gasket, as the one fitted in your photo looks terrible. It might be a trick from the angle the photograph was taken, but it looks to me as if the oil flow is being partially restricted by misaligned holes in the gasket. Unfortunately this is often the case with gaskets found in aftermarket kits. When you fit your new gasket you will have a chance to correct any errors.

The Morgo pump has a reputation for quality, they also advertise a 20% increase in oil delivery over the standard pump, this can only be a good thing. I am not sure if they do this by increasing the bore size or increasing the effective stroke of the pump (or both).

The pumps are pretty long lived, it was smart of Triumph to run them in oil ;)
One thing to watch out for is wear on the drive block , this can affect the amount of oil delivered, it is easy to measure to see if it is within tolerance.

As for the oil in your timing case, it should have some oil in it.
The crankshaft bearing is not sealed and has a free flow from the crankcase to the timing chest. The pressure relief valve dumps the excess oil that it ‘relieves’ directly into the timing chest.
The oil pressure in the crankshaft is not maintained by a seal, but by a bush that is a few thousandths of an inch bigger than the oil feed quill on the crankshaft, there will always be a little leakage.
This important size tolerance between the crankshaft quill bush needs to be checked very carefully as it is important in maintaining oil pressure.

Good luck
Peg.
 

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Hi MrLatz, Ok, you have a custom build. I can't see oil tank in photos. What are you using for oil tank? If not the original, the metering of return oil is important. If the orifices in tubes are not correct the balance of feed to rockers & return to tank can be skewed & cause problems.
Were you able to ride bike prior & found oil level in tank constantly falling with the amount lost from tank ending up in motor sump? Or... did you park bike some days or months without starting motor & oil in tank drained into motor? Again the amount of low in tank is in bottom of motor?

As Peg most correctly states the timing cover & motor sump will always have oil in them. If you have a real problem the tank will show oil drop. The tank level must be carefully monitored during testing. No guess, measure it if possible.

The drop will be rapid in minutes or miles depending on severity of problem. This is not accounting for normal oil consumption of course. If you are consuming oil that fast, it will smoke bad.

If motor fills with oil it will smoke bad also, finally start running odd as well. Again during road tests, don't let the tank run dry!
Don
 
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