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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,
I am going to try my hand at powder coating as soon as my eastwood kit comes in. I have a 2009 speed triple and im going to be powder coating the chrome pieces (headlight buckets, foot pegs, trip tree etc). So my question is, what kind of prep work do i need to do to the chrome? Just clean? sand and clean? Some advice from someone on here that has done this themselves would be greatly appreciated. I will be applying a carbide textured black to match the look of the frame, thats why i bring up the idea of sanding because im not too concerned with roughing up the parts a little. Thanks!
 

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My advice would be to get some junk pieces to practice on. This way you can nail your prep procedures down before you move on to the real thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
for sure ya... i already planned on doing a couple practice rounds with some scraps. however, i dont have anything chrome or polished to try out first. except maybe the stock levers because those wont be going back on the bike.
 

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I have been doing a lot of reading about this because I want to do some myself. Surface prep is key to the final results as with any surface coating. Give everything a really good degrease and clean down with panel wipe or spirit. It sounds obvious but don't try to coat anything that cant take heat, some chrome look parts can be plastic underneath!.

After the initial clean it is worth heating the item to a moderate heat in the curing oven to de-gas it. Metal surfaces are porous and when you heat them a lot of the containments come to the surface. Give it another clean down with panel wipe until there is no more guff on the rag (you should be wearing latex gloves to handle the part by this stage). If you miss this step out then all the grease in the surface of the metal will come out during the cure and potentially cause adhesion problems for the powder coat.

Finally make sure you cure it at the right temp for the powder you buy and stick to the instructions. It is possible to over cure the powder which causes surface imperfections (more an issue on high gloss finishes I suppose) and don't under cure it otherwise it wont be as tough as it should be.

On the note of sanding, from what I understand it is not necessary to sand the surface to give it a good key. Initially the powder is electrostatically attracted to the metal surface and, after curing, it gets a lot of its strength from encapsulation of the part rather than a simple surface to surface interface.

The most important step of all (as mentioned above) is make sure you practice on similar materials to get your technique perfect before you risk ruining part of your P&J
 

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Discussion Starter #5
^ right on thanks. ya i think thats the only part i hadnt read yet was the pre heating and second round of cleaning... thanks. oh and i did find a small box of old dirt bike parts (polished pieces/ chrome) so i do have plenty to practice on. now im just down to getting my set up in the mail.
if anybodies interested in trying this themselves, i pieced it all together for under what i got quoted by the local shop. i got the eastwood hot coat kit, a good sized toaster oven (2 12in pizza size) and 1lb of carbide textured black powder paint all for under $200
 
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