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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On my '95 Daytona, I get lots of popping through the exhaust when engine braking/decelerating. I don't know if this is normal for the bike, which has the D&D exhausts on it.

In addition, the bike occasionally wants to run on only 3 cylinders when at low revs (city/residential area). When this happens, it tends to want to stall at stoplights unless the throttle is blipped. At anything over 3-4k rpm's, this problem never occurs....runs like a charm.

I'm about ready to do a carb rebuild (as soon as my o-rings arrive :mad:) because I do know that I have some leaky float valves. Will make sure all jets clean, check for ovality in the emulsion tubes, check float heighths, etc. Hopefully this will take care 3-cyl/idling problem. I'm a little wary of checking the valve clearances, since I don't have the tool and am unsure about availability of the Triumph shims. I know I probably should, the bike just turned 20k miles and I don't know if it ever was done previously. Think I'd be safe for right now just doing a compression test?

Any suggestions from you Triumph pros?:)
 

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I don't know what putting on a D&D will do to how a bike runs but I think that your popping and stalling are probably related. It sounds like a lean condition in the idle circuit. Cleaning the jets should rectify this.

Check your valve clearances or pay to have it done. You're probably still ok but a non-seating exhaust valve will burn in short order. All a compression check will tell you is if you're about to burn a valve or not. It's very easy to CHECK the clearances, it's another thing to CHANGE them. The shims are common to many Japanese bikes. If you don't want to invest in the tool you can remove the cams to change the shims. Do you have a manual?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sailfish,

Thanks for the response. I totally agree with you about it being easy to just check valve clearances vs. actually having to change shims. Also, I've read some posts here where some folks have had luck in being able to reuse the valve cover gaskets...is this the norm, or should I just order one to be safe?

No, I don't have a manual yet. Do you happen to know which Japanese bike shims are interchangeable?
 

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The shims are 25 mm and are common to many Japanese bikes. I go to an independent shop here in town for shims.

I'm guessing that I've reused my cam cover gasket 3 times. Next time I might get a new one. I silicone the "corners" where the half moons fit into the head, and the ribbed (top) side of the gasket. It's a pain to clean off the old silicone.
 

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Same problem on 91 Trident

I was just about to post a question about popping on deceleration when I saw Frosty's thread. Hope I'm not hijacking your thread, but my problems might be related to yours.

I recently rebuilt my carbs, and since then the bike runs great apart from this problem. It pops a bit on tickover too, but not at all when revving the engine. During the rebuild I hade to drill out and replace one of the mixture screws, so I had no idea how to set it when I put the new one in - I just went for the factory setting. How do I know if the bike is running too rich/too lean? And how would you tell which carb to adjust? And presumably to make the adjustment you have to have one of those fancy expensive screwdrivers.

BTW - adjusting valves - I'd say don't waste money on the valve shim removal tool - it's easier to remove the cams. I bought one, ended up removing the cams anyway, so sold it again. Check my posts elsewhere for that tale...:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was just about to post a question about popping on deceleration when I saw Frosty's thread. Hope I'm not hijacking your thread, but my problems might be related to yours.

I recently rebuilt my carbs, and since then the bike runs great apart from this problem. It pops a bit on tickover too, but not at all when revving the engine. During the rebuild I hade to drill out and replace one of the mixture screws, so I had no idea how to set it when I put the new one in - I just went for the factory setting. How do I know if the bike is running too rich/too lean? And how would you tell which carb to adjust? And presumably to make the adjustment you have to have one of those fancy expensive screwdrivers.

BTW - adjusting valves - I'd say don't waste money on the valve shim removal tool - it's easier to remove the cams. I bought one, ended up removing the cams anyway, so sold it again. Check my posts elsewhere for that tale...:)
Can you get to your plugs relatively easy to do some plug chops? One of the ways I would check to see if any cylinder was especially lean (on my Suzuki's without fairings) was to put a few drops of water with a little plastic syringe on the header pipes when the bike was running. You can see if they all "sizzle" away, or evaporate, at about the same time from the heat. If one cylinder was really running lean, the water would no longer sizzle away but literally "bounce" off of that header. This just gives a rough indication if there is a large difference in cylinder temps......or course, you could also use an infra-red thermometer.
 

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Frosty - thanks I'll try that.

MOT - rubbers all good - I replaced all three between carbs and airbox when I did the overhaul. (Sooo much easier to get on when the edges aren't all chewed up:))
 

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Its possible the D&D have leaned the low end.

Popping on idle would suggest an incorrectly set low mixture..too lean that is..
 

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Frosty - thanks I'll try that.

MOT - rubbers all good - I replaced all three between carbs and airbox when I did the overhaul. (Sooo much easier to get on when the edges aren't all chewed up:))

It's the OTHER three that would cause a lean condition if they were leaking, the manifold rubbers on the engine side of the carbs.
 

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It's the OTHER three that would cause a lean condition if they were leaking, the manifold rubbers on the engine side of the carbs.
Duh - me being dumb again :confused: - it was actually the ones on the engine side of the carbs that I did, and it seems to have fixed the problem of the engine idle speed picking up once the bike is hot,
 

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I'm fairly sure nobody's T3 is having trouble with the IACV or throttle bodies.

Cheers,
-Kit
 
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