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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Based on the conversation in another thread and my inability to find what I am requesting, I wonder if someone would post a basic step by step to lube the rear wheel bearings. Since the break down of this bearing seems very dangerous I am guessing that many would be happy to have the info.

Pics are not necessary but the correct sequance, maybe any special tools and/or their substitutes, and the correct lube type would be very valuable.

Thanks a bunch all!

M
 

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If no one else answers this post I will gladly walk you through it, but only after this weekend. If you can wait that long.

KB
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If no one else answers this post I will gladly walk you through it, but only after this weekend. If you can wait that long.

KB
Hi there KB,

Thanks for the offer. :) I am hoping that someone does post as I planned on tackling it this Saturady. However if no one does I will hit it Monday. I am not taking any chances and have the bike parked until I adress this.

Cheers
M
 

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Hi there

A reasonably simple task. You will need the 46mm socket for the rear wheel and shock asborber nut and a torque wrench.

Remove the chain guard and slacken the chain right off and pull it off the sprocket and lay it on the swinging arm out of the way.
Put the bike in 1st gear. Knock up the peening on the shock absorber large nut with a small screw driver , apply the foot brake and slacken the nut a little .
Remove the rear wheel.
Remove the rear break caliper and hang it out of the way on the left hand side of the bike.
Fully remove the large nut on the shock absorber and pull off the shock absorber from the axle taking care to catch the conicle washer. Make note which way around the washer fits. remove the stepped washer from behind the conical washer.
There is a flat washer that sits between the shock absorber and the drive side bearing remove this and retain.
remove the rear wheel.
Pull the axle carefully out of the hub from the right hand side. If this is stubborn a smart tap with a copper hammer will set it free.Take care not to introduce any dirt onto the axle or RHS needle roller bearing.
Place a finger full of the correct grease onto the needles of the needle roller bearing again taking care not to introduce any dirt. this is sufficient grease.
Reinsert the axle through the bearings ensuring the RHS outer oil seal is correctly seated. Replace the flat washer up against the drive side bearings over the axle and re install the shock absorber assembley. Reinstall the step washer and then the conical washer making sure it is the correct way round. you should ideally use a new nut so that the peening to stop it spinning is in good order, but you can get away with using the original if you keep a constant eye on things to ascertain it does not loosen in use.
Put the caliper back on.
Put the chain back on and roughly adjust and tighten (but not fully) the adjuster pinch bolt, only sufficient to hold the chain adjustment during centre nut tightening. Put the bike in 1st gear and apply the foot brake and torque up the centre nut. The torque setting is 108 foot/ pounds or 146 N/metres. Peen the nut into the slot of the axle to stop it spinning in use.
Replace the rear wheel and tighten to the same torque.
Replace the chain gaurd and finally fine tune the chain adjustment and tighten the clamp nut to 42 foot/ pounds.
This takes less than an hour to complete.
There is no need to grease the drive side bearings these are sealed for life.
Good for another 10k miles
Hope this helps

Cheers

StevyR
 

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I did this without peening, and nobody got knocked up! :eek:

An admirable effort, StevyR, but possibly a bit on the British side for us Merkins. Took me a while to figure out the shock absorber you mention must be what we call the cush drive! :D

Oh, also, try putting the bike in 6th instead of 1st!

Mmagus, do you have the Haynes? Section 1•25 talks about lubing the rear wheel bearing, referring you to chapter 6 for hub removal. Once the axle is removed from the hub, the needle bearings will be plainly visible.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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I'll try to do it this evening.

For now, it is a reasonably simple task for a reasonably competent mechanic. if you have never done this sort of work, or work that could have serious consequences, this is not the task to learn on.

Do not put fresh grease in with old grease.

Remove the bearing, clean and inspect it. Do not spin it.

Use new grease seals.

And do not take the shock absorber loose unless you enjoy doing unnecessary work.
 

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Shock absorber= cush drive rubbers= old tyre inner tubes ( for us bodge it n fix it types)

EDIT: In no way am I condoning replacing your worn cush drive rubbers with bits of old tyre innertube!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Shock absorber= cush drive rubbers= old tyre inner tubes ( for us bodge it n fix it types)

EDIT: In no way am I condoning replacing your worn cush drive rubbers with bits of old tyre innertube!!!!

Thanks for the clairfication on his I was trying to picture in my mind why I would need the shock absorber off. I have repacked a bearing or two in my time...but never removed one from a cycle...just cars. I just talked to the local triumph dealer and the mech said they just use Yamaha bearing grease to do it. (they also are a Yammie dealer). I am guessing lithium based bearing grease? orrrr?

OND clean it with.... White gas/naptha? I have used that before totally disolves grease and dosnt hurt rubber at all. In fact its used in drycleaning clothes lol.

Thanks for the assist all. I will try to find a manual online somewhere for reference too.

M
 

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I can only comment on the repacking the bearing as I haven't owned my ST long enough to do any maintenance other than lube the chain. Repacking a bearing is a fairly universal technique.

Carb cleaner makes a good parts cleaner. Following with electrical contact cleaner is even better as these generally dry very quickly and leave no residue. Alone they are not good degreasers.

You not only want to completely clean and dry the bearing, but also the bearing housing, and shaft. The shaft will contact the needle rollers, and must not have scratches. Hairline scratches can be smoothed with emery cloth. Larger and you may want to replace the shaft.

Assuming there is room for the grease to get out of the bearing if too much is applied, don't worry about applying too much. Too much is only a problem if the excess has nowhere to go. The grease that works it's way out can help to block something else from getting in. In more open applications, grease is treated as a seal of sorts

If the clearance between the needle bearing and the sealed roller bearings is very tight, you should be able to see air gaps between the needle rollers. You may even want to pack it, slide it onto the cleaned shaft, spin it for a while, remove it, and wipe off the shaft. The bearing should now contain a safe amount of grease.

The bearing race should not be able to turn inside the wheel. else it will roll as the loaded wheel rolls and a type of corrosion called "fretting" can result. If it's a bit loose, a light film of blue Loctite completely over the outer surface will prevent it from moving. Loctite has an industrial product that is thicker and green that is specifically designed for this purpose, but the blue will suffice if you can't find it and the tolerances are tight.

When I say a light film, I'm talking very light!! If there so much that it runs into the needle bearing when you insert it, you may need to replace the new bearing. Follow the bearing with a rag as you insert it and hopefully prevent any from entering the bearing. It will set into a thermoplastic in 40 minutes or so. Faster ifyou have the industrial version which contains less solvent.

Some people hate using loctite, but used appropriately, it can prevent many worse problems.

Again, this advice is not triumph specific. Be sure to use the specified grease unless you are genuinely qualified to spec a superior product.
 

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+05 Rear Wheel Bearing Inspection and Lubrication
Special Tools
46mm wheel nut socket
Chain adjust spanner
Circlip pliers
Aluminum/brass/copper drift punch.
Bearing installation kit or substitute

Parts and Supplies
Inner circlip
Grease seals (2 ea.)
Kerosene or other cleaning solvent
Grease, NLGI 2
CoppaSlip grease
Cushdrive "stake" nut
Cautions
Place secondary support under bike after raising the rear.
Circlips are springs, and springs will attack.
Procedure
The bike will be jacked to remove the wheel, chain, and cush drive for access to the eccentric hub. The bearing will be removed, cleaned, inspected, and reinstalled with fresh grease and new seals. The removed parts will be reinstalled and a test ride will be performed after a chain adjustment and final inspection.
Axle Removal
1. Apply rear brake pressure and loosen the wheel nut and the cush drive nut. Do not remove them at this time.
2. Raise and support the rear of the bike.
3. Remove the wheel nut and note the order of the associated parts and spacer.
4. Remove the wheel and store it for reinstallation.
5. Remove the brake hose cover, chain guard, and rear wheel speed sensor if equipped.
6. Remove the caliper mount bolts and tie the caliper out of the way with safety wire or ty-wraps. Do not disconnect the brake hose.
7. Loosen the swing arm pinch bolt. Use the chain spanner wrench to rotate the hub to the max chain slack position.
8. Remove the previously loosen cush drive nut and note the orientation of the Belleville and stepped washer.
9. Remove the axle shaft from the right side. At the same time as you remove the axle, the cush drive will also disconnect from the bike. Position yourself to be able to hold the cush drive with one hand as the axle is removed with the other.
10. Remove the cush drive hub and spacer.
11. Remove the caliper carrier hub circlip and remove the carrier from the right side.
12. Remove the hub from the left side.

Bearing Removal
1. Inspect the right knife edge orientation and make installation notes for reference. Remove the seal being careful to not scratch or mar the hub surfaces.
2. Remove the bearing retention ring from the right side. Note the seal knife edge orientation then remove the seal from the center of the hub. The seal will remain in the hub until the bearing is removed.
3. Working from the left side, remove the inner circlip. It will remain in the hub along with the seal until the bearing is removed.
4. Carefully secure the hub in a vise the left side facing up. Using the aluminum drift punch, incrementally work the bearing out of the hub. Be very careful to place the drift so that it does not damage/deform the bearing cage.
5. Remove the previously loosen seal and inner circlip.
6. Remove the left side bearing retention ring and using the drift punch from the opposite side, remove the left bearing (stack of two bearings). Inspect the bearings then put aside for reinstallation.
7. Clean and inspect the hub and correct any mars/dings with a jewelers file and/or emery cloth. Be certain to remove all of the old grease from the hub interior.
8. Clean the right hand bearing (needle bearing) with kerosene. Do not spin the bearing needlessly. Use a soft bristle brush and low pressure air. Do not spin the bearing with air pressure! This is guaranteed to ruin a bearing. After cleaning, inspect the bearing for pitting, galling, signs of over heating, or other defects.
9. Lube a new inner hub seal and install it inside the hub. Next, install the inner circlip so that it is inside the groove. Now, position the inner seal so that it is against the circlip.
10. Using a bearing installation kit, or the suitable size socket, spacer, pipe, etc., place the hub and bearing in a vise and carefully and slowly close the jaws and push the bearing into the hub until it contacts the inner circlip. Be vigilant for misalignment as you do this. If there is any misalignment, stop, remove the bearing and inspect the hub for damage and correct as necessary.
11. Install the retaining ring
12. Install the left bearing stack using the same method.
13. Install the retaining ring.
14. Lubricate a new seal and install it so that it contacts the retaining ring.
Lubricate the new bearing with 5 grammes of NLGI 2 grease.
15. Clean the swing arm hub bore and lubricate it with CoppaSlip grease.
16. Reinstall the hub and other removed parts.
17. The factory spec calls for installation of a new "stake" nut on the cushdrive side. If the staked portion of the nut was not deformed excessively during removal, it could be reused. If an examination of the upset area of the nut indicates any fractures, it should be replaced. Reuse of the nut should be done with the understanding that it is against the factory recommendation and the nut should be inspected frequently for security.

Final adjustments and inspection.
1.Verify that all required torques have been performed.
2. Adjust chain.
3. Lube chain.
4. Rotate wheel and listen for unusual noise. Watch the wheel rotation and look for run outs.
5. Do a short, slow test ride and note any unusual vibrations, etc.
6. After the test ride, do one more visual to ensure all is well.


Rear Wheel Component Order.jpg

Rear Wheel Bearing 008.jpg

Rear Wheel Bearing 009.jpg

Rear Wheel Bearing 010.jpg

Rear Wheel Bearing 011.jpg


Additional pics in following post.
 

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Took me a while to figure out the shock absorber you mention must be what we call the cush drive! :D
I thought you Brits called shock absorbers "dampers"... For some reason my company uses what I think are British terms for car parts. We also call the hood a "bonnet."

Mmagus, do you have the Haynes? Section 1•25 talks about lubing the rear wheel bearing, referring you to chapter 6 for hub removal. Once the axle is removed from the hub, the needle bearings will be plainly visible.
Also, when the bearing is free of grease, be very careful that you hold it over a clean rag in case the needles fall out. Not sure how the triumph one is designed, but I've had this happen to me several times. If they do, just put some grease in the race and it will hold the needles in place as you reinsert them. As long as clean and undamaged, now worries.
 

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Follow on pics.

Rear Wheel Bearing 017.jpg

Rear Wheel Bearing 022.jpg

Rear Wheel Bearing 023.jpg

It is an extremely poor practice to lubricate an old bearing without removing, cleaning, and inspecting them. I am well aware that many people will take shortcuts and avoid a bit of work. Some do it and get away with it, others suffer the consequences. It is not worth the risk to me.

Some grease bases are not compatible. Unless you know exactly which grease was used previously, you run the risk of mixing bases.

There are many greases available. The important thing is to not mix bases. I prefer waterproof grease over water resistant. The grease I use is Bel Ray Auto Marine Motorcycle Waterproof. It is an NLGI 2 aluminum complex base. Most others are lithium base, which is a form of soap.

Btw, if you go this route the inner circlip is one of the stoutest I have ever removed. :eek: I broke a good set of circlip pliers on it.
 

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OnD,
Did you just do the job, take the pictures, and do the write-up on greasing this rear wheel bearing?
Very impressive. My hat is off to you, sir. :bow:

And thanks.......this post is a keeper for my maintenance files.

---Charlie
 

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Great pics of the bearing. The frame usually prevents the rollers from falling out, but the plastic is usually very delicate. Be sure not to hit it. It's also difficult to clean out this type of frame completely with just a spray. An air nozzle is does a great job of blowing out all the old lubricant and solvent.
 

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Don't know which bearing application you are referring to but this one definitely does not have any plastic, and while it is precision, it is not delicate. I suspect the rear wheel would lock up if the rollers fell out.

I think I covered the cleaning procedure already (Bearing Removal, step 8). BTW, this configuration is no more difficult to clean than other open cage types.

If you are going to suggest an air nozzle, I think you should also specify a regged down source of air to prevent bearing damage.
 

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Don't know which bearing application you are referring to but this one definitely does not have any plastic, and while it is precision, it is not delicate. I suspect the rear wheel would lock up if the rollers fell out.

I think I covered the cleaning procedure already (Bearing Removal, step 8). BTW, this configuration is no more difficult than other open cage types.

If you are going to suggest an air nozzle, I think you should also specify a regged down source of air to prevent bearing damage.
Sorry, you are correct. The steel frame will not crack, but it can still dent.

And I neglected to complement your excellent input. I don't mean to be critical - just adding to what you've done well.

You're right about the air pressure. No more than 40psi should ever be used for cleaning purposes. This is primarily a safety recommendation though, as there is no control over where debris will blow. I usually set a bearing like this in a balled up rag to catch whatever blows out of it. This also lets me inspect for debris. If I see some the first time I blow it out, I'll clean& inspect it VERY thoroughly, but likely trash it regardless.

Also very good that not spinning the cleaned bearing was emphasized. I've seen people really make them sing with an angled air jet. Sounds kinda like a turbine. Very bad move.

Falling out needles was meant for the removed bearing, not installed. They don't fall out of an intact frame on their own.

Not that it's relevant, but I have mixed feelings about frames in needle bearings. Debris that might take a while to cause a frameless bearing to seize, might cause a frame to bend which then causes the bearing to seize. As stated before, it's more difficult to clean them. It's also more difficult to inspect them, and you can't inspect the race. With a frameless needle bearing, I remove all the rollers, lay them on a white poly rag, and roll them together looking for defects. No can do with framed rollers.
 
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