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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in trouble. I desperately want the R3T. I did qualify for the 3.9 financing offer, but backed out of buying at the last moment. I have a serious case of MAS (Motorcycle Acquisition Syndrome).

I have a bike now that's not paid off. I don't 'love' my bike. I 'love' that R3T. It suits me....unique, powerful, dead sexy.

Finances are always a pain. I have a good income (and expenses to match). Should I hold off a year or two or three ? Should I pay down some of my debt before buying my dream ?
Should I go for it anyway and live in debt hell ?

Please help.
 

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Too much debt can make you THINK "long time dead!"

The R3T is going to be around for a while. If you really want one, consider selling your other one and paying off the note in early Spring. Then the deck will be clear to get the one you really want!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay, I have had most of the day to mull it over. With the economy in the ****ter, my work and the budget cuts, divorce, paying for a house I don't live in, debts that I have, makes buying a new bike now an unwise move. I'll wait until next year at the earliest. Just have to suck it up and work work work.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I hear a lot of advice about only paying cash for things. I can see that as a sensible plan, although it's not really practical. For those of us working stiffs that don't make large salaries, it is quite difficult to save up thousands of dollars for a car, bike, computer, furniture, and on and on.

The theory sounds great. But reality sets in when you don't make a lot of money to begin with. I make a modest income. If I were to follow that conservative financial plan, I would spend way too many years waiting to have a decent car (I'd have to buy an old beater and hope it lasts), nice furniture (thrift stores), a bike (no bike) and some other things.

To me it seems that with that reasoning, only affluent people should be able to buy motorcycles (or any other non essential items). I read a lot of posts here and on other forums about how people have all this money to drop on a new toy (bikes and other stuff). I don't get it. Am I supposed to give up all the stuff in my life that I enjoy and just be a worker ? Most everyone I know works hard, pays their bills, and tries to get a little happiness by having a bike (or something else). I think that's a big problem in this country these days. Everyone wants the lifestyle, but has to finance it. I don't see too many folks that do it different.

Sorry for the ramble.
 

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Unless you have a need for the RIII, I'd wait for your other bike to sell or until an off-setting amount of debt is paid down. Your financial survival comes first.
 

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It is not that hard. I make a very modest income as well with three small kids but we just save for what we want. My bike is a 2000 Trophy that will run with about anything here and it is very nice. Bought it with low miles for under 5K cash. Needed another vehicle recently and bought a 97 Suburban for $4500 cash. It also is very nice, just a little older than others but it is solid and will go for a long time to come. For the cost of just a few months of payments on a new one like that mine is paid off. We don't really want for anything. Now I don't have a 50" flat panel LCD TV yet but without having to make $300 bike payments and $500 car payments every month I will be able to get one for cash soon. For most of us our future income is not a sure thing. I know first hand. I was in corporate life for 15 years with what I thought was a lifelong gig. Not a big salary but comfortable enough. They called me one day 5 years ago and it was gone. Luckily I kind of already had the pay as you go mindset but I also have had three car payments and large credit card balances at one time too. Trust me this is better.

Sorry for the lecture.
 

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Yes, credit is a useful tool; but it must be used wisely or it becomes a burden. This, however, is a broader philosophical discussion. Let's not hijack the thread to hold it here.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I do appreciate all the replies.

I know that with the following:

DIVORCE - not yet final
Mortgage
Rent (for the apartment-pending sale of house)
Car payment
Bike payment
Loan payment
Credit card (smaller balance)

I look closely at my budget, and with all the uncertainty of the economy, trading in my bike for a better one is just not a good thing right now.

I at least have a bike to ride (and a nice one at that). I just occasionally get the urge to do something irrational. That is partly why I am in the predicament I'm in.

I just have to wait.
 

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You live in Florida where the weather is conducive to motorcycle riding year 'round. If you use your motorcycles for transportation as I do (year 'round), they aren't just "toys" as they are for so many (snowed in) folks here. That makes owning bikes more of a rational decision. That being the case, if, after you budget all of your expenses against your income you have an additional 30-40% unaccounted for, I say go for it. :D
 
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