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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The other day I did the baffle removal mod using advice from this forum. I’ve seen the instructions many times, but never pictures so I’m posting some hoping it might help someone else.

Step 1 is to drill through the flange at the end of the baffle (Figure 1a and 1b). I used a 1 1/4" hole saw in my variable speed, reversible drill. I originally bought the hole saw from Ace hardware to drill a hole in a stainless steel sink. Just chuck it up, stick in the end of the pipe, and drill until you get through the flange. Took me < 30 seconds per pipe.





Step 2 is to break the two welds holding the inside of the baffle. As others suggested, I held a socket with channel locks against the flange I just finished drilling through, then I hit the socket with a hammer a few times (see Figure 2).



(That’s chrome-plated channel locks holding a chrome-plated socket in the end of chrome-plated pipe in front of a chrome-plated wheel. Too bad my driveway isn’t chrome-plated.)

I didn’t feel the welds snap when hitting with the hammer. Rather I could just see the socket slowly going into the end of the silencer with each hit. I used a 15/16” socket because that’s the first one I grabbed that fit over the end of the baffle's pipe. I think I should have used a slightly smaller socket because the 15/16" socket just fit over the flange I just cut with the hole saw and the socket got stuck on one of the pipes.

Step 3 is to remove the baffles. Most of the other instructions I've read said to use needle-nose pliers or something to remove the insulation, then drill more holes for the broken welds to come through. But I read one post that suggested using a 13/16” EZ-out and the whole thing would come out in one piece. I don’t have that big of an EZ-out but this technique sounded much easier than drilling more holes. I figured I could find something that would fit in my dill that I could wedge into the end of the baffle pipe. I found that a 3/4" spade bit fit right in there. To give the spade bit something to grab onto, I used needle-nose vice grips to de-round the end of the pipe (see blurry Figure 3a).



I stuck the spade bit in the de-rounded pipe, held on tight to the drill, and pulled the trigger. After a few spins forward and backward, I started to pull and the baffle pipe, with the insulation and the wire wrap, came out pretty much in one piece. It seemed to come out easier with the drill running forward (see Figure 3b).



Figure 3c shows the baffle after I was able to pull everything out.



Figure 4 shows the two inner welds that had to be busted in step 2.



Here’s before and after recordings of the sound the pipes make:

Stock T100 silencers with the rear baffle

Stock T100 silencers without the rear baffle

I recorded these lo-fi sound files using my PDA about five feet behind my T100 with the PDA on the ground.

The sound difference isn't huge, but they seem more "growly" without the baffle and at least you can hear the pipes over the engine noise now. I'm happy with the results and this was teh easiest mod I've done except for removing the reflectors off the rear fender.
 

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Outstanding! Can't wait for my next free day to do this little bit of surgery on the bike. Thanks for the detailed instructions. :razz:
 

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Awesome write up! We get a lot of people asking how to do that. This thread will definitely be added to the ol' favorites list!

Thank you!!!

-brent
 

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Thats one great post mate, well done, answers a lot of questions.
 

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KD. you are one cool dude going to all that trouble to put up the photogrpahs with comments.

Excellent job and compliment Carl's original post.

Someone buy this guy a drink or make him President.

Excellent

Robert :razz:
 

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No matter what you post that you have done to a bonnie, some one will ask this question, "Did you rejet?"

I'm about ready to start asking that in other post topics, like helmets or seats just for kicks. :Laughs menacingly:

Thax for the baffleactomy pics and instructions.
 

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Excellent post, I almost felt sorry for that poor muffler when I saw it throwing up all that stuff.

Phil.
 

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O post of my dreams! I've been waiting for this one for weeks! Words cannot describe.

Pics, sound files, step by step instructions with work-around for the flange breaking. Its all good.

Can I also ask the question about the sound difference while riding - does the growl now drown out the knitting needles?

P
 

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Why is their a hamster in our exhausts?
 

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kdlutes,

Excellent post; very well done! Did you try to drill through the remaining baffles? You should put this in the Downloads section of the forum. Thanks for a great contribution to the forum.

EL84,

The stock Bonnie out of the crate is set up by the factory to run lean; this is done to meet EPA emission standards. Some folks have rejetted to 112 mains without doing any muffler modifications. Remember, the leaner an engine runs, the hotter (temperature wise) it runs.

To answer your question, no, you would not have to rejet after this mod. Removing the rear baffle does not greatly increase the exhaust flow. Personally, I would rejet to 112's without doing any muffler mods. I am at sea level. That's just my opinion.

If you were to drill out the remaining baffles, you should rejet to, at least, 115's (115's are the size of the jets that come with TORs). I found 118s to be ideal in this scenario as verified by a dyno run exhaust analysis.
 

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Same mod as Carl and this post, I run 118's with stock needles, no shims, and about 3 turns on the mixture screws..

Runs clean, exhaust analysis is good, and plugs are good.
 

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EL84,

You are certainly welcome.

If you are considering rejetting, purchase a carb screw replacement kit. The stock screws are soft aluminum and you will mess up the head on at least one when removing them. The replacement screws are stainless steel allen heads screws. Rejetting is easy and once you have the replacement screws installed, you can rejet in 10 - 15 minutes.
 

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Well done KD, and thanks for posting those pics. Very helpful for anyone interested in performing the "surgery".

Bill
 
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