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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At some point I think I'd like to restore an old Triumph. I'm fairly competent & have for years seen Penn Foster Motorcycle courses advertised. Does anyone have any experience with them? I don't expect to gain the knowledge required for an '07 fly-by-wire Yamaha R1, but is the course worthwhile for this type of pursuit? And if not, where would one go to learn? Thanks all!
 

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The Triumph shop manual and possibly one of the restoration guides AND AN ILLUSTRATED PARTS BOOK are really all that is required.

Hughie Hancock's restoration video is excellent.

"Kim the CD Man" also has an excellent CD with ALL of the parts books, shop manuals and tech bulletins.

Non-brand-specific books, videos and courses are okay, but not directly helpful.

HAPPY WRENCHING!
 

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If you can survive the URAL an old Triumph will not be a problem.
I doubt the course you talk about will help you much with the old bikes(but will probably lighten your wallet.)
As GPZ said get a prts book, & shop manual for the bike you get (also look for a video on the brand you choose). Then give it a go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks much for the input! I've heard of an out-of-print restoration guide by David Gaylin specific to the Bonneville & TR6 from the 50's to 80's. Does anyone have an opinion on it?
 

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Haven't seen the Gaylin book; its not available in my library system and the book sells for over $100 on eBay. Bacon's book on Triumph Twin restoration is pretty good. I really recommend you try your local library. Even in my small town, there are three or four different Triumph shop manuals on the shelves, as well as the Bacon restoration book and several histories.

I agree with the guys about the manuals and classes. If you have any skills, and enough sense not to use a hammer where a wrench or screwdriver is indicated, you should do fine. Classes are expensive and none (at least none that I know) would be specific to bikes that are essentially antiques. Just take your time. If you have a problem or a question, there are some very knowledgable and helpful guys here, so just ask.
 

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if you are looking for a copy of the book try

Motor Cycle Days
P.O. Box 9686
Baltimore Md 21237
ph 410 665 6295

OR

GT Motors
816 East Howe Ave
Lansing, Mi 48906
ph 517 485 6815

for a start
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I appreciate the help! My local library has the David Gaylin book, I'll definitely check it out before I drop $150 on it! :hihi:
 

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motor cycle days is owned by dave gaylin
original retail on the book was $29.95 :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well I'll be... good to know about Motor Cycle Days. I'll give it a shot! :bow:
 

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JP, I had no mechanical experience, either motorcycle or automobile, before I did my resto. All I used was the Triumph Workshop manual, Triumph Parts manual, and the video GPZ told you about. These bikes are wonderfully easy to work on.
 
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