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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All

If this has been discussed before then I apologise. Don't think it has been discussed directly.

I have just put the Pazzo short levers on the bike. I thought these are supposed to be used with two fingers. But (stooopid question coming.....) what do you do with the fingers that are left on the grips? I would imagine that the objective is that they should not get crushed under the levers or get in the way of the full movement of the levers???

What do you do with your spare fingers? Or have I got it all wrong?

Cheers!
 

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You leave them on the grip.

I started in the dirt because that is generally excepted as the smart way to hold the controls in that realm.

If you have your levers adjusted right you should be able to move the full range of throttle with two fingers on the brake and two on the throttle tube. This also promotes keeping your elbows down and in, a little body possition trick that many people don't get right (as is locking their elbows and putting their wieght on them). Same for the clutch I never take my fingers off the clutch when riding. Well ok, if I have the throttlemeister on I might, but I propbably don't have any hands on the bars at all at that point. Thottle locks are good for stretching out when you get stuck on the highway.
 

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Yes, you keep your remaining fingers on the grip. My understanding of why the shorty's became popular is that many riders have developed the two finger operation of the levers, especially on the brake.This way, you can cover the brakes while being able to have control of the bike. Having the shorter lever makes it less cumbersome.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies guys. I think I have more riding/testing to do.

If I use just two fingers, keeping the other two on the grip then they would be crushed by the lever as it comes towards the grip, especially on the clutch side. Then on the brake side, I wouldn't want my two remaining fingers to get in the way of an emergency brake (reducing the travel of the lever).

Faffy - the levers will allow three fingers to be used at a push. They aren't that short, but shorter than standard. Three fingers are usefull in heavy London traffic when the clutch starts to feel heavy. On the brake two fingers does the trick, but then as I say, the fingers that are left can get crushed behind the lever. You probably know that with the standard levers you can use all fingers if you want to, and a bit more.
 

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Thanks for the replies guys. I think I have more riding/testing to do.

If I use just two fingers, keeping the other two on the grip then they would be crushed by the lever as it comes towards the grip, especially on the clutch side. Then on the brake side, I wouldn't want my two remaining fingers to get in the way of an emergency brake (reducing the travel of the lever).

Faffy - the levers will allow three fingers to be used at a push. They aren't that short, but shorter than standard. Three fingers are usefull in heavy London traffic when the clutch starts to feel heavy. On the brake two fingers does the trick, but then as I say, the fingers that are left can get crushed behind the lever. You probably know that with the standard levers you can use all fingers if you want to, and a bit more.
Solution:
- shorty on brake side, 2 fingers on all the time. Move lever further away to account for initial long throw (OEM brakes) or upgrade you brakes to reduce travel to proper length
- full length on clutch side. Shorty is good for track, in street riding, when you have to pull-in the clutch for longer times it's unnecessary sacrifice of efficiency for style.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Don't know about echos :confused: But the lever advice is coming in very handy. Just takes a bit of getting used to.

Thanks to all - erm, most.
 

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Tripped1 hit the nail on the head.
You do not need to pull the clutch in all the way to downshift. No need to use the clutch when upshifting. Give it a go before you leave the garage. You can put the bike into gear with 2 fingers on the clutch and it wont move.
As for the brake side, brake fade is a thing of the past. You can get maximum stopping power without the lever touching your fingers on the grip.
It takes a bit of getting used to, but it is the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
OK I geddit! I think the problem I have is that I've been testing it in the garage which in itself presents some challenges :eek:

Best to brave the temperatures tomorrow and give it a proper road test.
 

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Tripped1 hit the nail on the head.
You do not need to pull the clutch in all the way to downshift. No need to use the clutch when upshifting. Give it a go before you leave the garage. You can put the bike into gear with 2 fingers on the clutch and it wont move.
As for the brake side, brake fade is a thing of the past. You can get maximum stopping power without the lever touching your fingers on the grip.
It takes a bit of getting used to, but it is the way to go.
It's a pretty simple matter to keep everything adjusted so the clitch releases very soon into the lever pull, I've run like this for years. I've had people tell me they hated it when they rode my bike though.
 
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