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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for some advice on painting a fiberglass front fender.
I've recently gotten airtech's short front fender. It's gelcoated white, and comes unfinished (no holes to mount it.)
I got a quote of $95 to have it professionally painted a single solid color. Seems a very steep price to me, but I was told that the part has to be carefully and thoroughly cleaned and prepped to remove any dirt or oil that tends to cling to fiberglass.
I'm really tempted to paint the thing myself for a fraction of the cost, but can I use a rattle can of paint and then hit it semi-glossy clear coat?
Suggestions appreciated.
-Glenn

[ This message was edited by: Tabletop on 2006-12-20 22:27 ]
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info sweatmachine.
I thought it was an easy thing to do, until I was given a price -then guessed there's got to be something I don't know that would make it so costly.
 

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the biggest thing is surface prep. after sanding, the proper cleaner should be used to clean off all dirt and oils from your hands. visit your local body shop supply or napa for the right cleaner. also spray bombs can't protect against fish eyes that you don't know you'll get untill tou spray.

mike
 

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Thanks guys. Always a wealth of knowledge on these boards. You've all reassured me that it can be done properly as long as I'm careful with the prep work.

I unfortunately can't start work until after the holidays, but I'll be saving some cash I can use for my next project.

Cheers and happy holidays!
 

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Tabletop, it will be interesting to see how the spray can route works. I am doing the same thing with both fenders but am going the whole primer/Triumph Black base coat/clear coat route (from Motorcycle Paint Supply.) Going that route, the paint itself costs as much as your painter wanted for the whole job.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
From all the help I've gotten, I've now got a plan:
Position the piece and drill holes to mount to the forks.
Test fit the piece.
Prep the fender, then test paint the underside...practice and if I make any goofs it won't matter much.
I'll try Krylon paint first and apply in two or three thin coats, or until coverage looks good. If the Krylon doesn't adhere very well, I'll look for a more specialized paint.
Paint the top, may clear coat if its not very glossy.
I'd like to put rubber grommets in the mounting holes in the fender, to reduce stress and the effects of vibration.
Large stainless washers on the inside of the fender, bolts with loc-tite.
And ZOOM!
I'll begin work after the first of 2007, and I'll post back here with my progress and pics (if my digital camera will behave.)
 

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I've never used the Krylon, but have had great results with the automotive Duplicolor available at any autoparts store. It's a few dollars more, but that just means it's better right? Ha. Anyway, the thing with rattle can paint jobs is that they take a bit longer for the paint to harden all the way. Some people say a week or two. Being the impatient SOB that I am, I've f'ed up alot of small paint projects due to lack of patience.

Goodluck,

Mike
 

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Tabletop

I've done many a paint job using spray cans, sand with very fine sand paper, wipe down with thinner, make sure you wash your hands before touching any parts. I put the spray can in hot water to heat the paint some and use light coats. Make sure you get enough paint on the item, then after it's dry (couple days) wet sand with 2000 grit. the bikes below were done with spray cans.



 
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