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Discussion Starter #1
ya, and it was kinda chilly too, we went for a ride, 100 km one way, as I pulled in the driveway, the water light came on , damn idiot lights...temp guage coming...lol....
anyways, I left it run for a few, waiting for the fan to kick on & it didn't.
so I am thinking to look in the fuses to start, but was wondering if anyone had any heating problems.
95 T Bird, stock( for now)
was first trip with my honey on, wasn't speeding 110 km/h
was too damn cold ...jeeeeeese, we have snow ,just to the south of us in Edmonton.....
 

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Search the forum - there was an issue with the temp light coming on when it shouldn't, but I don't remember the details. You can also run a jump wire to the fan motor to be sure that is working, and once you confirm the fan is okay, you can work backwards through the wiring to see if you have a dirty connector somewhere. Several folks have cured a variety of issues here on the forum simply by cleaning the plastic connector block terminals and reconnecting them.
If your coolant hasn't been changed in a while, it is an easy job, and good preventative maintenance. This is a pretty good article on the procedure:

http://www.webbikeworld.com/tbird/coolant/
 

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+1 on changing coolant & thoroughly flush the system if you've any doubts at all that it's not just a w/l glitch. These bikes will not overheat in normal running speeds, tho' will easily in stop go traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ok Thanks, I was thinking to change the coolant anyways, who knows, have added a bit, and am getting some evidence of leakage at the cap, the fan should run tho....
do you know of a temp gauge that I can get?
 

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Temp gauges you'll find threads on here from people who've done it.
There's no direct kit or anything to do it.
If you have proper coolant level, the light may just be due to a poor ground.
It's been an issue and you'll find threads for it also.
Get some pointers from here or use your repair manual before changing coolant.
It has to be bled correctly or overheating will occur.
 

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As has been covered many times before... just because your temp light is coming on doesn't mean your bike is overheating. The temp light and the fan switch are on separate circuits, and the fan switch is the most reliable system. If it was cold, and the fan didn't come on, your bike is probably fine.

The ground to the dummy light is notorious for having inadequate ground. The Trophy riders used to have some instructions on how to fix it. I have been running mine for years like this and don't worry about it. I did wire a switch to the fan circuit so I can kick it in when sitting in traffic for long periods (just to be sure)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I will do my research better in future, searching old threads, my bad, thanx for the info guys
will check the ground, the bike was stored indoors always , and it's in almost showroom condition, barely any evidence of the years, so it has me lulled into a blissfull assumption of
bug free riding a 15 year old bike.....
Thank you for your patience
 

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I will do my research better in future, searching old threads, my bad, thanx for the info guys
will check the ground, the bike was stored indoors always , and it's in almost showroom condition, barely any evidence of the years, so it has me lulled into a blissfull assumption of
bug free riding a 15 year old bike.....
Thank you for your patience
Although it seems counterintuitive, long term storage of either a bike or a car is one of the worst things it can undergo. The fluids in a vehicle are its lifeblood, and protect not only the components from wear while running, but also tend to keep any moisture dispersed. A vehicle which is stored allows that moisture to accumulate in several places, causing corrosion and contamination of the fluids. Gravity, of course, is also at work, so heavier things like sludge head to the bottom of the engine where they gather, while the lighter moisture vapors head to the high spots. Electrical connections are also constantly deteriorating from moisture which doesn't get driven off. Rubber parts dry out and harden, and most of this takes place inside components where it cannot be seen. The "Norton in the Barn" fantasy that we all have would not be the joy that we all imagine, but rather, the beginning of a very long and arduous restoration project. Ask anyone who drives a really old classic vehicle, and ask them how much time commitment it requires to keep it in decent condition. Personally, I would rather be riding.
 

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Well, when you own an old vehicle, you just have to be prepared to go through a restorative process every 20 - 30 years. This can pretty much be a ground up tear down, cleaning and refresh....

If you are willing to invest this, they can still be a joy to ride. Triumphs are great for this, as parts are readily available. Japanese bikes, on the other hand... :eek:
 

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If you are replacing the fan switch, you might want to find the thread that talks about a replacement that closes at a lower temp. I got one at the local auto parts store (VW part as I recall).

Best mod I've done to my bike. I hear the fan often now, but haven't seen the red light all summer.
 

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Just a side note...how old is your rad cap?
 
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