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Looked at a very basket case T120TT. Engine and frame numbers match. He was really busy (has a bike repair shop and mainly works on Harleys) so could only get a few quick shots of the bike parts. What you see os a roller frame and engine with no primary cover, rocker boxes, or carbs. He is asking $4000 for all. I don't know anything about the Triumph "TT" models but am currently researching. The VIN is for a 1967 correct? How hard to get NOS parts to restore this bike (don't want to use non-original parts if I can). Opinions and thoughts needed? He said he has had it over 30-years and the engine will definitely have to be torn down and will have to look for missing parts. Thanks.
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Very rough looking, especially for multi-thousands, and not a lot of parts on that frame that I'd want to reuse. Hate to see an engine open long enough to rust the primary chain. It's likely quite original as those look like the K-70 Dunlops that it might have come with. The TTs were more rare than the street models, but I don't know anything specific about them. Different ignition system I think.
Parts wise it's a matter of how much a hobby do you want? Everything's available at your basic cycle swap meets and british bike rallies, and often for very good prices (used more likely than NOS) but that's lot of time invested. fleabay has it all but can be hard to determine exactly what you're getting sometimes and prices are all over the map. Easier if you can find someone still in the business.
 

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TT's are uber rare and so are often faked. However as a non expert, I don't see anything that jumps out. In the uk they can cost £15-20k restored. They were basically off road racers but people rode them on road.
There is a guy in the uk that used to post on here who researched them a lot

If you can restore a triumph to a decent standard, and it's genuine, plus beating the guy down, it is worth it.
 

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Hi Senior,

don't know anything about the Triumph "TT" models but am currently researching.
Have you found Triumph T120C, T120TT and Trophy Specials already? That website owner also wrote a number of threads and posts a few years ago on the BritBike forum.

Engine and frame numbers match.
VIN is for a 1967
Appears to be.

no primary cover, rocker boxes, or carbs.
How hard to get NOS parts
It's a 53-year-old motorcycle ... That said, afaik primary cover and rocker-boxes are standard '67 650 so, as @Streetiger posted, available second-hand; also afaik, carbs. are available new but check with Amal?

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone!
I noted that someone put a TLS front brake on. I know I am looking at thousands to restore, the only saving thing is I can to a lot of the work myself. I have done total frame-up restorations in the past (Harleys). What worries me is the condition of the engine (internal)...crank, bearings/bushings, cylinders and head. I can certainly assemble the engine, but machine type work I can't do as I don't have the equipment or access to machine shop equipment anymore as when I did my last Harley restoration (a 1981 FXS Lowrider). Anything beyond that, I can do (with the exception of painting).

I am now fully retired and have plenty of time (and a nice budget for bikes). I bought a 1970 T120R that I am tearing apart starting April. If I buy the TT, it would be awhile to get to it, but figure it would be a long term restoration project.

StuartMac, thanks for the link. Very interesting!

I think $4K is on the high side also, but I don't think the owner will come down as he knows a bit about Brit bikes. He has a number of Triumphs, BSAs, and a couple of Nortons in back of his shop in a building in various states and lots of parts. He is my age and getting to the point that he has no clue what he is going to eventually do with all the bikes and parts (I have an idea....LOL). I dealt with him when I owned Harleys. I am going to ask him some questions today. First, does he have a title to the bike? Second, when he gets a chance, I want him to pull the plugs and see if he can turn over the engine as not sure how far the rust, etc has permeated the engine, and if it does turn over, see if he will throw in a primary cover and rocker boxes with the price. IF all of the above is good, then I think I will go ahead and buy it. Cool bikes. Would be nice to own a "rare" matching TT I think. Thanks again for everyones opinions and thoughts.

Best, Senior
 

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Seems high for the condition it’s in. The TT came with 11 to 1 compression, a smaller countershaft sprocket, energy transfer ignition, alloy fenders , and no lights , speedo, or mufflers. It had the famous TT pipes under the engine.
 

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I can’t remember if the ‘67 TT had folding pegs or a skid plate, but probably did. Also SLS front brake, not TLS.
 

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Seems like a steep buy-in, unless you're truly married to getting a money is no object TT and restoring to that.
There are quite a bit of them out there , lots in that shape too if it's the challenge you're after - if you think you're going to flip it an make some money on it that might be tough with the buy-in price considering it's shape - assume you will be replacing just about every bearing, bushing , seal plus whatever was already worn out when it was taken apart and parked 30 years ago - do that math, it adds up very quickly .
 

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Thanks everyone! Haven't committed to it yet. I still have my 1970 T120R to restore. Thinking of asking the owner to add some parts to the bike for that price (primary cover, rocker covers, battery box and left side cover, and front brake if he has them. Figure the engine is going to cost of lot. He charges $1500 for labor, plus parts to rebuild the engine. Thing is, he sees a T120TT on Ebay, etc asking price around $18500.00 so he is basing his asking price on what one "could possibly" sell for. Asking price is not a final price. HOWEVER, he will never get around to restoring it. If I don't buy it, he will no doubt put it up on Craigslist maybe Ebay and probably ask $4K for it...don't think he would get it in the area around here...might, but...I like the owner a lot. Great Guy! A "hoarder" in a way, so it is hard for him to sell stuff, you know the type? They don't like to negotiate much. The thing going for me, is, I am not particularly "hot" to get this bike. Looking at it as an investment to restore and sell. The issue for me on that is not sure what these bikes actually sell for and I figure the $18K bikes are all original and mint. I am thinking maybe $7K-$8K to restore it doing most of the work myself as possible. Again, also, due to the uncertainty of this COVID-19 and my wife's work and possible layoff and we have only so much in savings, that...might not be the time to spend that kind of money.
 

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HI RMC S(SS), If you want to invest in something, buy $4000 Vangaurd S&P500 mutual fund. Right now while price is low. I'm very serious.

Problem with this bike is you'll spend so much money & even though everybody wants one, they won't buy one, so market is really fairly small. Go back & look at bike sales. The collector market is shrinking every day. Many of the buyers that actually have that kind of money are too old to spend it or dead already.

If you wanted it to ride or as a keep sake, that's another situation. I've not ridden TT, but I've put a lot of miles on dirt with '70 TR6C. Nothing like a modern lightweight, but super fun in its own right. The power is unreal & they can climb forever if you have the traction.

On the other hand, many feel including me 1970 T120R is an extremely desirable year. Especially earlier production with plunger for shift cam. Really the top of the heap for Triumph development. Has every improvement dry frame & 650 motor got. Does not have to be 100 point restoration so long as it looks "right".

Well built this bike will run like a top, be very reliable & fun to ride. This bike if looks good & mechanically perfect is very coveted by a wide audience from a few young riders to lots of oldsters. Very desirable & sellable. I wager you'd make more profit on this bike at end of day should you sell it. I've been seeing many bikes around San Francisco area being bought by 35-45 year old's that actually want to ride it for real. They have $$ to spend, but want to ride it. That's the problem with restored TT. It's just a show piece.

I've been noticing to get top dollar the bikes have to work as good as they look for real & have current license & registration. Not non operation. These bikes go quick for good money. My money is on the '70 Bonnie.

Oh, In 5 years the Vangaurd fund will be $8K+, take your wife on nice vacation. Buy a trailer & take the Bonnie & do day rides at every destination.
Don
 

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The prices are high, but note the T120RT on ebay recently had to sell at a much lower price than advertised. If you want a stripped down T120, it is easy to make one up to look like a TT120. i always prefer to ride a bike with lights but like the look of the TT120. never considered it for ownership though. If i was looking for an old Triumph, i would pay a bit more for a really good one owned by someone who has ridden it himself for a few years. If that box of parts was in the UK, someone would pay that money as we have a lot of people taking pleasure in restoring rather than riding a lot. 2 types of enthusiast who enjoy what they do.
 

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Hi, I'm like GrandPaulZ. I love working on bikes & riding them too. About equal. I do about 5k miles a year on my bike.

My point was on investment building bikes. Very risky unless you really know the market & what you are doing. If you are expecting to make a reasonable profit for your efforts.

Some guys like building & selling for little profit. Really they just like building & sell for the money to buy another project. That's great so long as you know what you're going to do & make.
Don
 

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Out of 170 bikes I bought over the years, I never bought a SINGLE brand new bike.

I'd say I paid "market price" for no more than a dozen of them, and "lowball" price for maybe 20 of them.

ALL THE REST were fixer-uppers, non-runners that had been sitting, rolling/unfinished projects, rusty/crusty orphans, basket cases, and parts lots..

I've owned 44 classic Triumphs, and 2 modern ones.

I probably sold 20 or 25 unfinished, rollers, and projects. These were the only ones I never got to ride.

The other 100+ got significant work, serious work, or total restorations. (besides the 100+ client bikes I've built or worked on)

I didn't get many miles on 25-30 of the bikes I kept a little while as runners, maybe an occasional ride, and to/from bike shows or local rallies.

The other 100+ bikes I kept and rode any length of time got plenty of use, by myself, my boys, my wyfe, friends, and occassionally strangers at bike shows and rallies. I've kept a pretty serious database since I first learned to use Multiplan in 1988 (early spreadsheet program), and thought long and hard about bikes I owned before that time before entering them in the database, and I figure I've done somewhere between 250,000 and 275,000 miles on my bikes, and another couple thousand on other people's bikes.

Bikes? Yeah, sure, I like 'em...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
HI RMC S(SS), If you want to invest in something, buy $4000 Vangaurd S&P500 mutual fund. Right now while price is low. I'm very serious.

Problem with this bike is you'll spend so much money & even though everybody wants one, they won't buy one, so market is really fairly small. Go back & look at bike sales. The collector market is shrinking every day. Many of the buyers that actually have that kind of money are too old to spend it or dead already.

If you wanted it to ride or as a keep sake, that's another situation. I've not ridden TT, but I've put a lot of miles on dirt with '70 TR6C. Nothing like a modern lightweight, but super fun in its own right. The power is unreal & they can climb forever if you have the traction.

On the other hand, many feel including me 1970 T120R is an extremely desirable year. Especially earlier production with plunger for shift cam. Really the top of the heap for Triumph development. Has every improvement dry frame & 650 motor got. Does not have to be 100 point restoration so long as it looks "right".

Well built this bike will run like a top, be very reliable & fun to ride. This bike if looks good & mechanically perfect is very coveted by a wide audience from a few young riders to lots of oldsters. Very desirable & sellable. I wager you'd make more profit on this bike at end of day should you sell it. I've been seeing many bikes around San Francisco area being bought by 35-45 year old's that actually want to ride it for real. They have $$ to spend, but want to ride it. That's the problem with restored TT. It's just a show piece.

I've been noticing to get top dollar the bikes have to work as good as they look for real & have current license & registration. Not non operation. These bikes go quick for good money. My money is on the '70 Bonnie.

Oh, In 5 years the Vangaurd fund will be $8K+, take your wife on nice vacation. Buy a trailer & take the Bonnie & do day rides at every destination.
Don
Good points! Got me thinking more about the TT. The TT to me is an investment, not a bike I would keep. In my retirement now, I am planning on buying vintage bikes and restoring them as a hobby and to make some money. The Bonnie though is my keeper and as you know I have future plans for it. The Bonnie comes first. Thanks again!

Best Senior
 
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