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I haven't posted in a while since I picked up the TT, been having way too much fun :D Only probably was, I was having too much fun this past Saturday and layed the bike down pretty good.

Warning.. some painful Triumph pics:





 

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Discussion Starter #4
Before:



Time to rebuild... as soon as my leg heals :(

Does the damage look bad to you guys? I probably won't bother with insurance and get Sharskinz or pick up some used plastics and repair anything else that's broken.
 

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The front plastics look fine although they're obviously scuffed. They probably wouldn't look too bad if you cleaned them up some. The cockpit can probably be repaired with fiberglass. The tail I would just replace and get painted. I have a non-matching set of tail plastics that I could sell you.
 

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Totally fixable.

Most of the fairing damage can be filled with good ole Bondo.
Tail peices seem to be the easiest and cheapest to find.

Now all you have to do is pick your new color!!!!
 

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how did you manage to batter both sides of it?? looking at the fairing damage, it is a sobering thought as to what would happen to my S4 if i did similar. probably be a write off after that.

Least you lived through it. remember, its the rubber bits that are supposed to be on the tarmac!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The front plastics look fine although they're obviously scuffed. They probably wouldn't look too bad if you cleaned them up some. The cockpit can probably be repaired with fiberglass. The tail I would just replace and get painted. I have a non-matching set of tail plastics that I could sell you.
I'll probably end up replacing the cockpit plastic with a Sharkskinz piece.. Unfortunately I don't have anywhere to do fiberglass ork.

Email me about those plastics! I found some yellow on on eBay last night but I'd rather buy 'em off another Rat member. jonthan.c.chan AT gmail.com

Totally fixable.

Most of the fairing damage can be filled with good ole Bondo.
Tail peices seem to be the easiest and cheapest to find.

Now all you have to do is pick your new color!!!!
I'm gonna stick with Caspian blue... so pretty, haha. Yeah, I wish I had bought my frame sliders sooner, I was going to get 'em this month, hehe.

Looks fixable. Glad you're ok...

Zane
Thanks dude.

how did you manage to batter both sides of it?? looking at the fairing damage, it is a sobering thought as to what would happen to my S4 if i did similar. probably be a write off after that.

Least you lived through it. remember, its the rubber bits that are supposed to be on the tarmac!!
I'm not too sure how both sides got damaged. I suppose the bike did a little tumble as I came off. The seat is pretty borked, so I'll have my girlfriend recover it for me.

Now I just have to wait for my fractured leg to heal . :D
 

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I'm glad to hear you got away alive, although a busted leg is no fun.

My advice is to not buy any repair parts until you gave the bike a very good looking-over and measuring. Depending on how hard the bike hit the deck, or if it ran into anything while down, the muffler could have hit the swingarm hard enough to tweak it. Same with the wheels; make sure they didn't hit anything, and if they did check them for trueness. Also, check the steering stops on the lower triple clamp for damage. I would also check the forks for straightness (if they are not bent they might still be twisted in the triple clamps and need realigning.)

I would be surprised if the front subframe (cockpit subframe) is not bent, and that part is expensive new and hard to find used. You can probably bend it back to somewhat stock position, but getting the mirror holes to line up and the gap between the headlight and fairing to look even and on-center is a real pain. I'm sure the rear subframe is bent, and those are sometimes hard to find undamaged, used, and can get pricey. The mudguard looks like the mounts broke off, but could possibly by repaired; but that piece takes a lot of vibration and unless the repair work is really good it will break again. You can usually find the mudguards used, but they're not always cheap.

Check the oil pressure sensor, as it looks like it might have been damaged. Also, before trying to start the bike, I'd search the forum for threads regarding cleaning out the cylinders and airbox of oil after a bike goes down on the right side.

Again, I'm glad you are okay and my advice is to get a list of what you need and price it all out before buying, as it might be cheaper to find another TT600, unfortunately. It looks like it didn't smash into anything, save the ground, so the chance that the suspension/frame is damaged is unlikely; but you can never be too careful when it comes to making sure the bike's geometry is undamaged and safe for riding and that you know how much the repairs will be approx.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm glad to hear you got away alive, although a busted leg is no fun.

My advice is to not buy any repair parts until you gave the bike a very good looking-over and measuring. Depending on how hard the bike hit the deck, or if it ran into anything while down, the muffler could have hit the swingarm hard enough to tweak it. Same with the wheels; make sure they didn't hit anything, and if they did check them for trueness. Also, check the steering stops on the lower triple clamp for damage. I would also check the forks for straightness (if they are not bent they might still be twisted in the triple clamps and need realigning.)

I would be surprised if the front subframe (cockpit subframe) is not bent, and that part is expensive new and hard to find used. You can probably bend it back to somewhat stock position, but getting the mirror holes to line up and the gap between the headlight and fairing to look even and on-center is a real pain. I'm sure the rear subframe is bent, and those are sometimes hard to find undamaged, used, and can get pricey. The mudguard looks like the mounts broke off, but could possibly by repaired; but that piece takes a lot of vibration and unless the repair work is really good it will break again. You can usually find the mudguards used, but they're not always cheap.

Check the oil pressure sensor, as it looks like it might have been damaged. Also, before trying to start the bike, I'd search the forum for threads regarding cleaning out the cylinders and airbox of oil after a bike goes down on the right side.

Again, I'm glad you are okay and my advice is to get a list of what you need and price it all out before buying, as it might be cheaper to find another TT600, unfortunately. It looks like it didn't smash into anything, save the ground, so the chance that the suspension/frame is damaged is unlikely; but you can never be too careful when it comes to making sure the bike's geometry is undamaged and safe for riding and that you know how much the repairs will be approx.
Thanks BF, I'll check those things out when I get some time to look over the bike.

Gonna ring up the local Triumph dealership to see if they can come take a look too.
 

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Bomb is correct, but don't worry too much just yet. I have thrown race bikes into the bushes on a regular basis, patched them up, and headed back out. A tweaked subframe or fairing stay isn't beautiful, but it won't make the bike dangerous or unrideable. As pointed out, it will make the plastic fit poorly. A damaged swingarm is another issue entirely, but judging from the damage to your bike, I would be less likely to suspect damage to it. To make sure, check with any local club racers you can track down and find out where they get frame repairs done. Chances are there's a shop somewhere who straightens motorcycle frames and swingarms. The shop can tell you if it's a problem, and can most likely straighten it if necessary. The guy up here always has a whole lot more work the Monday after a race weekend, and the bikes he straightens out get flogged down the track at top speed as soon as he's done.

Another thing to look at is the airbox. Your bike appears to be a 2001, and they have a shorter breather valve than the later models. If the bike was running when it was on its right side, chances are good the airbox got some oil pumped into it. Worst case, the engine could be hydrolocked. Best case you just need to clean out the airbox so you don't gunk up your valves over time.

Another typical problem after a right side drop is the oil pressure sensor. It's behind the small blister toward the front of the right side of the bike. Check to make sure the wiring didn't get damaged. On the left, the clutch cover is very easy to damage. Yours looks scuffed but not cracked from the pictures, but it's hard to tell. My guess from looking at the damage is the bike went down on it's left side first, the front wheel tucked and kicked it over on its right side. The damage to the exhaust looks like the bike may have pivoted around a bit. It's hard to tell, but I am guessing the bike was lying on it's right side after the crash was over. The left side took the bigger impact and since none of the scuffs with the exception of some on the tail section are vertical, it was still moving forward when it flipped over. It didn't roll over the windscreen or at least one of the mirrors would have been broken off and the tank would be in worse shape. The bars are pretty easy to break off, too, so the lack of damage to bars, bar ends, and levers mean they didn't hit the ground. For this reason, I would suggest checking the fork legs for straightness as well.

There's my take on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Bomb is correct, but don't worry too much just yet. I have thrown race bikes into the bushes on a regular basis, patched them up, and headed back out. A tweaked subframe or fairing stay isn't beautiful, but it won't make the bike dangerous or unrideable. As pointed out, it will make the plastic fit poorly. A damaged swingarm is another issue entirely, but judging from the damage to your bike, I would be less likely to suspect damage to it. To make sure, check with any local club racers you can track down and find out where they get frame repairs done. Chances are there's a shop somewhere who straightens motorcycle frames and swingarms. The shop can tell you if it's a problem, and can most likely straighten it if necessary. The guy up here always has a whole lot more work the Monday after a race weekend, and the bikes he straightens out get flogged down the track at top speed as soon as he's done.

Another thing to look at is the airbox. Your bike appears to be a 2001, and they have a shorter breather valve than the later models. If the bike was running when it was on its right side, chances are good the airbox got some oil pumped into it. Worst case, the engine could be hydrolocked. Best case you just need to clean out the airbox so you don't gunk up your valves over time.

Another typical problem after a right side drop is the oil pressure sensor. It's behind the small blister toward the front of the right side of the bike. Check to make sure the wiring didn't get damaged. On the left, the clutch cover is very easy to damage. Yours looks scuffed but not cracked from the pictures, but it's hard to tell. My guess from looking at the damage is the bike went down on it's left side first, the front wheel tucked and kicked it over on its right side. The damage to the exhaust looks like the bike may have pivoted around a bit. It's hard to tell, but I am guessing the bike was lying on it's right side after the crash was over. The left side took the bigger impact and since none of the scuffs with the exception of some on the tail section are vertical, it was still moving forward when it flipped over. It didn't roll over the windscreen or at least one of the mirrors would have been broken off and the tank would be in worse shape. The bars are pretty easy to break off, too, so the lack of damage to bars, bar ends, and levers mean they didn't hit the ground. For this reason, I would suggest checking the fork legs for straightness as well.

There's my take on it.
Thanks a lot Will, both yours and BF's advice will be heeded. I'm flying to Texas for work on Sunday, so it looks like the repair work will begin maybe next weekend, if all goes well.
 
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