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Discussion Starter #1
First an apology if this isnt the place to ask this.
I am hell bent on getting my second bike ( bought a 2013 guzzi v7 last year ) and i want a triumph now too.
I am looking at t100 bonneville from 2007 to 2014. BUT i always wanted from when i was a kid, a vintage triumph.
I'm thinking 1965 to 1970.
I'm 72, love the guzzi and im wondering what the pros and cons are of the new triumphs i talked about compared to the older bikes i mentioned.
Kick start, carbs, rougher ride are what i can suspect but any advice to swing me one way or the other.
Thanks for the help and the knowledge base here.
 

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I’m 53 and just bought a 68 Bonneville, I say vintage all the way. I’m looking for an experience not transportation. I want to be part of something, to me the old bikes are way to go. New just doesn’t have the soul I’m looking for if that makes sense. Not that there isn’t something to be said for refinement and comfort of a modern bike, I can appreciate them but that’s not what I was looking for in a Triumph. That’s my two cents...
 

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Pros of a new(er) Bonnie: The brakes are MUCH better. More reliable, less maintenance required. Better electrics and lighting.

Pros of a vintage bike: Romance of being vintage. Lighter weight. Look a little bit better.

As a bike to toodle around on when the weather is good, a vintage bike may be the ticket. For frequent use in all riding conditions, the newer bike will be much better. Less maintenance, better brakes, more reliable. Your Guzzi can handle the frequent/all conditions use, and you can scratch your vintage itch. If you're talking about having only one bike.... then go new(er). Adding a vintage to the stable? Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
any recommendations on uears to consider?
I think '68 is supposed to be the best and I thought I heard that the 70's bikes with oil in the frame were not good. But I don't know the facts.
Any recommentations also for models besides the bonneville?
Also. any ball park numbers for the proce of a nice '68?
 

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Metalman I see your in New Jersey, sorry. No just kidding lol. I’m across the street in PA. All depends on what 68 your looking for and in what condition. If I had to put a number on it in our area I would say a Bonneville is gonna be about $3500 on the low side, might not be matching numbers if that matters to you. And $7-$10k for very nice matching numbers bike. That’s what I have seen in my research others I’m sure will have their opinions. Good place to start your search is Craig’s or if your looking for a shop try Collins Cycle in Sutersville Pa it’s over by Pittsburgh. Good luck
 

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Meriden Triumphs win on looks, sound, character and involvement. On the other hand, most Hinckley bikes can run at a steady 100mph without things falling off, which is beyond most of Meriden's products.

Two of each please.
 

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Ok.

My 1971 TR6R purchased used from Mean Marshall (Ziegler's bike) for $1,100, in 1981:
Over 4000 rpm in 4th, which was about 65 mph, vibration threatened to shake the thing apart.
Accelerated nicely but could not keep it tuned. My bad. Kick-start was ultra cool - when it worked. Died on me on highway. Walked it home. Gave it away.

My 2009 Bonnie T-100 Green/White purchased new 2010 for almost $8K: 80 - 90 mph in 5th, no problem. Engine is so balanced. Still riding it, 40,000 miles later. Runs like day one.

I'd think about a T-120 if they made one nearly as pretty. Till then I'm fine.

Just sayin.

steve kensington
 

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Oh and pretty as hell don’t hurt either... js vintage all the way.

He is a real cutie..but whats that thing he is sitting on..chuckles ..and runs to hide in a corner
 
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