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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm considering installing a thermostatically controlled oil cooler system hopefully mounted in a spot that's discrete on my 1970 TR6R. This, I think, would work well with the oil filter and dynamic balancing, to give longevity to the little hardworking mill (also would give a little extra oil capacity). I think it would be great for hot summer NYC traffic that I'll be riding her in, along with hot summer NYC vicinity freeway riding that also has pretty heavy traffic almost all the time.

So, can anyone recommend a good quality oil cooler kit, I think it has to be thermostatically controlled, that would work well on a 1970 Tiger. I'd like to mount it somewhere with good airflow, but where it blends in with the bikes look, or better yet where you can't see it easily.
 

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Hi Gleamin. Don't waste your money. Use GOOD quality 20/50 mineral oil and change it at regular (1500) mile intervals. Don't worry about the hot weather the bikes work just as well in the desert........
Roy.
 

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I vote for a cooler!!...If nothing else it's going to extent engine life....I see no reason for it to be thermostatically controlled though.

Go to the Motorcycle parts section at EBAY,and type in "oil cooler".. Harleys & Jap bikes have been using them for yrs on air cooled bikes...You should find a good section to choose from.

Cheers, Don
 

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I'm interested in this topic too, as a southern Arizona rider who plans to use my 1970 TR6 in temperatures that could easily exceed 90 degrees. I too want to treat the engine as kindly as possible.

I've considered an upgraded oil pump a la the Morgo rotary, to move more oil through the engine. Morgo claims their users report reduced oil temperatures; however, I've read posts here during my searches on the subject which claim that it's impossible or at best pointless to force more oil through the engine. Is the Morgo marketing simply hype?

I'll be interested to read other opinions on the oil cooler option.
 

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stock system is fine with a filter added...morgo pump is a waste of money, oil in a dry sump system is cooled enough..a cooler does nothing in heavy traffic as there's no air flow...a 1970 dry frame has the biggest oil capacity of the lot with a 6 pint tank
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey guys, thanks for the responses. Everyone brings up good points. As long as you're driving along at 10 plus mph you're getting airflow over the cylinder cooling fins. The oil may be getting hot but the air flow should help keep it in check.

It's true though that an oil cooler will help the air flow cool the oil itself rather than just the engine surfaces that have the cooling fins, so there would be a benefit for truly hot summer weather as long as you have the airflow through the oil cooler. In other words riding along in 90 degree or hotter summer weather without an oil cooler would be OK as long as you're not over revving your motor or otherwise making the engine work extra hard (like carrying a passenger or accelerating briskly up a long hill), but having an oil cooler would without a doubt be better because the oil would maintain it's viscosity and lubricating properties better at the lower oil temperatures that would without a doubt be present if an oil cooler is fitted.

But that would also mean the oil cooler wouldn't help very much in stop and go traffic, due to the lack of air flow, which is when the oil cooling is most needed! Let's face it there's not much harder of an environment that you can put a motor under than laboring under really hot weather stop and go traffic. That's what I'm most interested in having an oil cooler for. Maybe there is a set up or kit out there that has a little fan that attaches to it and would pull airflow through the cooler when the thermostat turns it on, or maybe just a driver controlled toggle switch to turn on the fan. In this scenario the rider on the bike will definately know they need the benefit of the oil cooler and would switch on the fan.

But a thermostat controlled oil cooler is still a good idea because in the winter you don't want the oil too cool. Too cool is probably not a good thing. So in the really cold weather, and while the bike's oil is warming up in the spring and fall, the thermostat would prevent excess oil cooling. I still like the idea of a toggle switch for a fan to pull air through the oil cooler for high summer heat, stop and go traffic.

Hell, now I want an oil temperature guage!!
 

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Oil Cooler and thermostat

I lived a number of years in So Cal with my 67 Bonnie and never really had a problem with overheating, but I guess if you're talking some really slow speeds in really hot weather, it's probably a good idea - can't hurt. As far as the thermostaticly controlled valve - I'm really not a biggy on those - if it's really needed, too much risk for a failure. On my old Shovelhead, I use a cooler cover in the winter, and remove it when it warms up. I'm not really anti-technology, but I do prefer to have control of some things. Like my 4x4 hubs and my oil cooler.
Dog
 

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When I lived there, I rode my bonnie all around the city without overheating....not to say it wasn't hot as hell, and my clutch lever hand wasn't overworked from stop and go....and the sweat from my helmet was blinding me.....man it sucked..... So I shipped her out to Phoenix and took it across the desert midday in +115 deg weather...and holed a piston..... but others convinced me I was running too lean...

Anywhoo, I sympathize but think you might be overthinking it. I'm going to slap on an external cartridge oil filter as part of my ongoing rebuild, and hope the extra capacity helps bring down the temp and clean the oil a little better than the wire mesh filters from yesteryear.

Obviously just my opinion.....keep us posted on what you end up with and how it does - I'd certainly be interested!
 

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Fan

I have a QPD dry clutch which can get ver warm during stop/start traffic, so I fitted a 12v fan from a computer cpu into the primary (which has holes in it) to give some air flow.
Perhaps an oil cooler could utilise the same type of fan.

Mark
 

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In all my years of riding air cooled bikes, I have only ever had one overheat and that was after sitting in stopped traffic for 30 minutes. I have alot of old bikes that are air cooled and never have a problem. Not saying it is a bad idea, just saying I don't think it is really necessary. Just more stuff that could do wrong and more places for leaks to occur. On that note, I am considering installing an external oil filter kit on my 68 Bonnie. I don't really like the fact that there isn't a real oil filter on the bike.

How do you all feel about the external oil filters?

Thanks again,

Rob
 

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I had MAP's oil filter kit on my '70 T120. I think that coupled with regular oil changes would be more helpful than an oil cooler in prolonging engine life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree the oil filter addition is a great idea. I have the kit from Coventry Spares installed on my bike.

I'm thinking that regardless of if I do or don't use an oil cooler, that it would be smart to 1st install an oil temperature gauge. Then if my oil's temp stays in an acceptable range, I'll know the oil cooler isn't necessary. If the oil temp gets up too high, (by the way how high is too high for oil temp??), then I'll get the ball rolling to install an oil cooler.

Have any of you guys mounted an oil temperature gauge? Do any of you know which vendor sells a good quality oil temp gauge for a 1970 Triumph 650?
 
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