Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got my 68 Trophy project stripped back to its bare frame, and the rebuild will start in the next few weeks.

All the nuts and bolts I've removed are pretty much serviceable (and have been carefully bagged according to location), but are corroded to varying degrees. It seems a shame to refit them to what is going to be a freshly painted frame with either new or restored (in other words clean and shiny) parts.

I know engine case and mounting bolts are readily available as kits, and will be purchased when the time comes, but as for the various others, are these easy to find, or do I have to measure each and track them down individually? Are there any kits available for the frame fixings for example with everything needed included?

There were some odd bolt sizes fitted to the bike as it was (three different sized heads on the four for the rear footrest plates for example), so I'm not dealing with all original bolts as it is, hence why measuring everything wont necessarily give me the correct results. A bolt "kit" or several of them if needed would be ideal.

The other option a mechanic mate said is to just use metric nuts and bolts of the closest diameter (and of the appropriate grade of course). I'm not averse to this, given the bike is never going to be a show winner, but I want to do it right (as in safe, and aesthetically pleasing).

What would you suggest as the best way forward?

Many thanks in advance.
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,452 Posts
Use grade 5 UNF nuts and bolts not set screws. Look up the individual part numbers in the parts book, this will give you an under head length that you can match the nearest 1/8 inch. Then google the part number and you will typically find the bolt diameter. You could of course use Metric but then your riding tool kit has to have two sets of spanners.

As for the engine plates there should be two 3/8 diameter and the rest 5/16.

Rod
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Cheers Rod, really helpful info, and thanks for confirming the bolt specs.

The metric idea feels wrong somehow, and that point on the toolkit seals the deal for me.

I’ll do some Googling. :smile2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
You can buy high-quality UNF selection kits from Grove Components at a reasonable price.
http://groveco.co.uk
I have used them for years on all my classic and vintage restoration projects for decades, without ever having experienced a poorly manufactured fixing.

Make sure you get zinc plated though, stainless will create anodic reaction and corrode the steel around it.

Ian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,240 Posts
There is a logic to part numbers and part number progression.

My suggestion is to take your parts book and match it up to a suppliers price list. Also later Triumph Parts Books will have a chart at the end converting the number to a size.

If you don't have a Parts Book or an expansive price list might I suggest going to www.britishonly.com
Here you can download your Parts Book and a price/parts list for comparison.

K
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,619 Posts
Hi Dan,

I've moved this to the main CVV Forum from Vintage Technical Tips & Tricks (where you'd started the thread originally); doesn't really fit with the latter's ethos and more people will see it here.

Fasteners raise vexed questions here in GB because of the age of your bike:-

All the nuts and bolts
have been carefully bagged according to location
Platers are around that'll replate original fasteners but, even if any'll do it, they'll charge the earth to keep 'em separate according to your "bags"; most'll want a bucket-full, which they'll "tumble" to clean and replate; you then have to "measure each ... individually" as you rebuild. Be aware that they'll be replated in zinc, not the original cadmium, which is likely to appear horrifyingly-bright when returned but does dull relatively-quickly.

do I have to measure each and track them down individually?
Ime, 'fraid so ...

Usually, the quickest way to know diameter, thread and length is to take the part number from the parts book to http://stainlessbits.com/link12.html. However, this does contain several "?????" and a few mistakes - e.g. barrel base studs described as both "BSW/BSF" and "UNC/UNF" or a some small screws described as UNF when they're BA. Nevertheless, this doesn't take away that it was a vast effort and is still a valuable resource; it's now hosted by Forum contributor Greg Marsh (@marshg246;) who's also turned it into a searchable database at http://www.gregmarsh.com/MC/FastenersList.aspx. :thumb

Are there any kits available for the frame fixings for example with everything needed included?
Not in plated afaik, one or more stainless suppliers might offer "kits" for a given area; however, be aware even they're a vexed area, which I'll explain ...

Use grade 5 UNF nuts and bolts not set screws. Look up the individual part numbers in the parts book, this will give you an under head length that you can match the nearest 1/8 inch.
Hah, you wish! :)

Because most people who rebuild old bikes don't want plated fasteners going rusty as the finished restoration sits in the garage, stainless fasteners overtook plated some years ago. The parts suppliers sell relatively-few plated fasteners so, apart from any available being pretty-much as expensive as the equivalent stainless, your choice will be 'take it or leave it', rather than "grade", bolt/setscrew or a length you don't have to hacksaw (the end of which'll go rusty :cool:).

odd bolt sizes fitted to the bike as it was (three different sized heads on the four for the rear footrest plates
While the latter sounds like the usual DPO (Dreaded/Dipsh1t Previous Owner), bear in mind your bike originally had both Unified- and British Standard-thread fasteners, consequently at least two different hex. sizes for the same shank diameters ...

However you decide to proceed, if you don't have 'em already, I strongly advise a set of "thread gauges" aka "screw pitch gauges" - enter either phrase into your preferred internet search engine and decide how much you want to pay - and a way of measuring diameters accurately - good steel rule works most of the time but both Aldi and Lidl have low-cost-but-good digital vernier calipers time-to-time. Armed with diameter and tpi (threads per inch), you can look up a thread on t'internet - "unified thread", "cycle thread" and "bsf thread" become your new best friends in your preferred search engine. :)

I know engine case and mounting bolts are readily available as kits,
Mmmm ... you know your bike's engine case screws are BSF and the correct mounting bolts are Cycle? Ime, "kits" are more-often of Unified-thread fasteners ...

Then you're aware "kit" engine case screws will be Allen heads, not original Pozidrive and - if such a detail is likely to bother you - heads of different-length bolts could well be different patterns too?

Are there any kits available for the frame fixings for example with everything needed included?
"one or more stainless suppliers might offer "kits" for a given area; however, be aware even they're a vexed area, which I'll explain ..."

I started using stainless nearly forty years ago - originally the exhaust clamp bolts because the heat there causes plating to fall of fairly rapidly (due to differential expansion?) and then the fasteners'd both look crap and are difficult to remove/reuse. :( Then I disliked the way any plated fastener rusted at the hex. corners, plus I changed a lot of bolts on my T160's to studs-'n'-dome-nuts. Although I changed fewer bolts on subsequent bikes, I've never gone back to plated, because of the reasons mentioned above, because stainless are available in GB in a wider variety of lengths than plated and, even if any do have to be cut down, having cleaned up cut ends with files in an electric drill, they never rust.

I use stainless even if I'm trying to replicate the look of original cadmium, because even polished stainless lightly bead-blasted does ... but never goes rusty ... :thumb

Notwithstanding they came off the bike, ime you'll likely end your rebuild with a load of - usually short - bolts, having bought a load of new longer ones. That's usually because Triumph was tight about washers - you'll care more about hex. corners and spring washers gouging your new paint and chrome so you'll fit more washers - and at least some of your paint will be thicker than Meriden applied ... :cool:

The above is at least one of the reasons many stainless suppliers don't offer "kits", they got fed up with punters moaning how this bolt or that screw isn't long enough, not enough washers, yadda, yadda. I've used the Middletons for decades - very rarely out of stock of anything, quick dispatch; uniform look - when I've had to a buy a replacement for something I bought thirty years ago, the new one looks exactly the same. But, if I get a length or thread wrong, while they'll exchange the fastener, I pay postage both ways for my mistake ...

The other option a mechanic mate said is to just use metric nuts and bolts of the closest diameter (and of the appropriate grade of course). I'm not averse to this,
You should be - this is A Really Crap Idea. :(

"closest diameter" is rarely any good - if bolts and studs aren't of the correct diameter, vibration will wear holes oval - only 5/16" / M8 are close enough; 5 mm. is bigger than 2BA / 3/16", 6 mm. is smaller than 1/4", 10 mm. is bigger than 3/8" and smaller than 7/16", 12 mm. is bigger than 7/16" and smaller than 1/2".

Plus what would you do about threaded components - you can hardly fit, say, M6 Allen screws through the engine cases? So you'd be left with a mixture certainly of metric and British Standard fasteners, and probably some Unified too. :Darn Fwiw, years ago, an ex-girlfiend had a 1960's bitsa and, at first, I tried using more-common Unified fasteners rather than BS; but I came up against the problem that some original BS threads would take major work to convert to Unified ... in the end, it proved easier to use all-BS fasteners, as I should've done in the first place ... lesson learned ... :rolleyes:

What would you suggest as the best way forward?
Not sure there's one "best way", to a great extent, it's up to you, all we can can do is offer individual experience ... and point out 'the worst ways' ...

stainless will create acidic reaction and corrode the steel around it.
Never experienced that in nearly forty years and well over a dozen bikes and cars.

Hth.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Apart from the auto correct error (acidic was supposed to say Anodic, but I guess you knew that), now corrected, I am really surprised you have not experienced galvanic corrosion. I have seen it a number of times where stainless is against steel. It is even worse in aluminium; on a recent S2a Land Rover project, I had to bin most of the panels where the PO had fitted SS fasteners, presumably for longevity (the fasteners were ok but the aluminium panels were toast),

Stainless steel and mild steel are 0.25 and 0.6 respectively. More than enough to start galvanic corrosion in the weaker element (in this case steel or Iron). This is the reason for sacrificial zinc anodes on steel hull boats.

Obviously you need to add water (and worse: salt) into the equation to accelerate the process, as well as lots of time, but I build my restorations to last (I treat each one as a 'keeper') so don't take any risks. Zinc plated fasteners look as good as stainless and as long as they are good quality, will last as long.

Just sharing my knowledge and experience.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
You could buy home plating kits back in the day. I used one many years ago and the results were great.

Not sure if this is still viable but I had fun wtih it.
in the UK, I've ordered quite a bit of stuff from these guys for UNF parts.

namrick.co.uk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Don't forget if you use stainless to lubricate the bolt or nut before joining the two, stops 'galling', something that happens occasionally and always on a nut and bolt in the most awkward place to try and cut/snap the bolt in half. I use copper grease - sparingly.

As for a supplier, I use www.a2stainless.co.uk for odds and ends. Not the cheapest but very quick service.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,565 Posts
If you're in Yatley, you're an easy trip to Kempton Park.

Nooky's Nuts and a couple of other suppliers are always there - as is Andy Gregory
Andy sells some parts with an "s" after it's number to indicate stainless
Other suppliers like nooky sell from big trays in a pick and mix style operation

You could turn up with your dime bags and sort out fresh bags that match , keeping a paper tally as you go. That's what I have done.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,619 Posts
Hi Ian,

Apart from the auto correct error (acidic was supposed to say Anodic,
Ah, right, I did wonder ...

Nope, never experienced anodic/electrolytic corrosion with stainless in either aluminium alloy (e.g. engine cases) or ordinary steel components. I've used used stainless since 1980, increasingly through the 1980's, used it pretty-much exclusively since the late 1980's, not only fasteners but other components - I often have parts specially made in stainless. And, yes, from a past life, it was once part of a job to know what electrolytic corrosion looked like ...

on a recent S2a Land Rover project, I had to bin most of the panels where the PO had fitted SS fasteners, presumably for longevity (the fasteners were ok but the aluminium panels were toast
Mmmm ... I'd be inclined to look at the actual stainless and alloy for the cause.

As I posted for Dan, the use of especially stainless fasteners has been so widespread for so long on all common different makes of particularly motorcycles that the retail supply of non-stainless fasteners is limited. In addition, with the widespread prevalence of internet forums like this, if there was a widespread problem, it'd be all over said forums. But, as someone who's read and contributed to old motorcycle forums for over twenty years, problems with stainless on old motorcycles are simply not widespread.

If there's a problem with stainless, particularly in GB, it's that there isn't actually a legal definition of "stainless"; while I haven't seen any for some time, back in the late 1980's and 1990's, there were definitely shysters around playing on many people's desire for 'cheap' above all else. :(

Stainless steel and mild steel are 0.25 and 0.6 respectively. More than enough to start galvanic corrosion
Possibly, but that isn't the whole picture. One part you're missing is why certain grades of "stainless" don't appear to suffer non-galvanic corrosion; one reason they don't appear to suffer non-galvanic corrosion is also one reason they don't suffer galvanic corrosion.

Zinc plated fasteners look as good as stainless and as long as they are good quality, will last as long.
Define "good quality" for Dan The OP?

As I posted earlier, the first fasteners I replaced with stainless were exhaust clamp bolts. Ime, plated rust within a few months because the plating comes off with the heat. Otoh, I still have the first stainless exhaust clamp bolts I fitted - 39 years ago ...

Just sharing my knowledge and experience.....
Likewise ...

Hth.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
Hi Dan, Cadmium look alike plating kits are sold. I've used them. The plating looks good, but not thick & durable like factory. Takes hours. Commercially cad plating causes pollution so very few do it these days.

Like Stuart says stainless does a good job at visually replicating stainless. Better than zinc to my eyes.

Forget metric. That's no solution.

Your bike will be a mix of unified fasteners & CEI as well as BA. Just what Triumph did & a fact of Triumph ownership. The Philips screws are Pozidrive so you'll need a set of Pozidrive bits. Not stocked by most stores in USA, so I get online. Pozidrive actually grips better than allan wrench head, but one use of a Philips driver & it's damaged. Pozidrive is a different shape head. It will often have small hash marks between the slots. The driver has hash marks between the blades. Change to allen screws if you like the look of heads better. Your choice.

Since the bike has various CEI size screws you'll need a BA (Whitworth) wrench set as well as the imperial (inch size) wrenches. Again fact of life in 1968. Some imperial wrenches will work on CEI head, but don't really fit right. Some you really need the BA size, such as banjo bolt on carb fuel banjo. Head bolts & others.

Even my '73 Tiger has several BA wrench size hex fasteners.

Every last nut, bolt & screw has to looked at in its own right to make sure you have the correct threads. Some are close & start to work, then as you go a little deeper the threads are damaged. Not so simple.

Hears a question I've asked, when you go to a local hardware store & want to buy fasteners what do they sell? Can you get BA, CEI, Whitworth, imperial thread fasteners off the shelf.

Here in USA, BA, CEI, Whitworth are not sold even at specialty fastener shops. We must get from a Brit bike parts seller or on line.

BA is similar to what our machine screw sizes would be. A BA2 is similar, but not the same as our 10-32.

Here in USA hardware stores stock imperial thread machine screw sizes, fine & course thread bolts in zinc. Various hardness's.
A selection of stainless in similar sizes, but lengths are limited. Lots of metric but not such a large selection.

Specialty fastener houses such as C&M fasteners sells pretty much all sizes & materials, plus threaded rod in fine & course in different materials, a full range of metric. Most available different hardness's. Again no British type fasteners at all.

So you've got a huge task ahead of you. Get used to it. That's what vintage bike owner ship is like. Your basically going to have to go bolt, by bolt & nut by nut.

I've not had problems with stainless corroding either. I always put a bit of grease on threads to make sure it doesn't gall or corrode.
I don't find this makes all steel lock nuts come loose or bolts fall out of alloy cases. I use Loctite when appropriate. I find that stops corrosion as well. No grease or oil with Loctite.

Back in the day it was easy. Just go to the dealership a few miles from me & get it. Several Triumph shops within 20 miles. Usually all genuine parts. Now that was nice.
Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,565 Posts
BA isn't a "whitworth"
It was used mainly for model engineering, electrical connections, instrument making etc
Afaik it's a Swiss idea originally

Most hardware shops only sell metric here .
Only "four candles" type shops would stock Imperial.
The last shop in my town that had men in brown coats pulling things out of drawers closed last year after 87 years.
But any britbike shop will stock them by part number and autojumbles are full of specialists
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Nope, never experienced anodic/electrolytic corrosion with stainless in either aluminium alloy (e.g. engine cases) or ordinary steel components. I've used used stainless since 1980, increasingly through the 1980's, used it pretty-much exclusively since the late 1980's, not only fasteners but other components - I often have parts specially made in stainless. And, yes, from a past life, it was once part of a job to know what electrolytic corrosion looked like ...

As I posted for Dan, the use of especially stainless fasteners has been so widespread for so long on all common different makes of particularly motorcycles that the retail supply of non-stainless fasteners is limited. In addition, with the widespread prevalence of internet forums like this, if there was a widespread problem, it'd be all over said forums. But, as someone who's read and contributed to old motorcycle forums for over twenty years, problems with stainless on old motorcycles are simply not widespread.

Stainless steel and mild steel are 0.25 and 0.6 respectively. More than enough to start galvanic corrosion
Possibly, but that isn't the whole picture. One part you're missing is why certain grades of "stainless" don't appear to suffer non-galvanic corrosion; one reason they don't appear to suffer non-galvanic corrosion is also one reason they don't suffer galvanic corrosion.
Nobody is suggesting this is a widespread problem but it is a very well documented issue, regardless of either of our personal experiences.

https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stainless-steel-mild-steel.jpg

I guess that on the sort of vehicles we both work on, the majority of stainless fixings in mild steel or alloy will not cause an issue for many years as they do not generally have the accellerant of harsh conditions (water, salt etc) but it will happen over time (perhaps so long that we don't care?). The aluminium panels of the Land rover lost their battle with the quality (magnet test) stainless fittings after 15 years. But like I said; I treat each restoration as a "keeper" so whilst not exclusively discounting stainless, I switched to quality ZP some years ago.

The ZP bolts from Grove Components are exceptional quality, the best I have seen in 30+ years of building and restoring. The exhaust manifold nuts on my Lotus Seven still look great after over 10 years. Without a trained eye (or a magnet) you would be hard pressed to differentiate them from Stainless and there is no risk of reaction with steel or aluminium. Hence my recommendation. Take it or leave it.

Ian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thank you gents, lots of helpful info there, and lots to think about.

I realised early in the strip down process that standard Imperial sockets weren't going to cut it, so I bought a set of Whitworth spanners as well. Between them, I managed to get everything undone. But it is a real mix on the bike. I seem to recall one pair of pinch bolts on one of the yokes had metric Allen heads, just to add to the mix...

I have found a supplier that will do all the fork and front end nuts, bolts and washers - literally every fastening between the top yoke and the wheel - against the part numbers off the parts diagram (for a T140 as that's where the forks came from). £85 though - not cheap. Although will be hassle free.

I have a decent pair of digital calipers, so measuring diameters isn't going to be an issue. I will look at a thread gauge also.

I have access to an ultrasonic cleaning bath this weekend, so plan to chuck a few of the bolts in there and see how they come up. I'm not worried necessarily about shiny, (apart from perhaps the stem nut and the fork top nuts due to their prominent position), as long as they look clean, and I can get the surface corrosion off. It's a cheap (free) and easy thing to try, anyway, and it may allow some of them to be re-used satisfactorily.

Thank you everyone.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,619 Posts
Hi Dan,

I realised early in the strip down process that standard Imperial sockets weren't going to cut it, so I bought a set of Whitworth spanners as well. Between them, I managed to get everything undone.
By "standard Imperial sockets", you mean AF? Risking stating the obvious, the markings relate to the Across Flats hex. measurement.

Otoh, "Whitworth" and "British Standard" markings relate to the shank OD, but they're different ... :D BS and Whitworth hex. sizes are the same, but they relate to different shank diameters, and it's the BS shank diameters/markings that are most meaningful on your bike.

Aside, the reason for BS and Whitworth hex. sizes being the same, but relating to different shank diameters, is historical:-

. Whitworth was the first fastener standard (named after its inventor (Sir) Joseph Whitworth) and laid out not only shank OD (bka "major diameter") and tpi but also head sizes. So it then became possible for different companies to mass-produce fasteners and tools and know that one maker's tool would fit another's nut or bolt.

. However, Whitworth threads had a limitation in that 1840's metallurgy required coarse (few tpi) threads that were unsuitable for vibrating environments, because a fastener didn't require much rotation to loosen it. By around the beginning of the 20th century, metallurgy was advanced enough for even fasteners taking a high torque to have finer threads, while smaller hexs. saved metal and money; the Whitworth hex. sizes were used to speed acceptance of the new British Standard Fine thread but each BSF major diameter used one hex. size smaller than the same Whitworth major diameter.

. It's for that reason your new "Whitworth" spanners are marked with both a fraction suffixed "BS" and a smaller faction suffixed "W"; e.g. "5/16 BS" and "1/4 W"? That's because the same hex. size is on a British Standard nut or bolt with a 5/16" major diameter/shank OD and on a Whitworth nut or bolt with a 1/4" major diameter/shank OD.

. Nevertheless, you shouldn't come across actual Whitworth-size nuts and bolts - Triumph didn't use 'em on unit-engine bikes and the last time I came across brand-new Whitworth-thread fasteners (in the 1980's), the hex. sizes were British Standard for the major diameters. IIrc, the only actual Whitworth threads on your bike might be the ends of the cylinder base studs into the crankcases - if the nuts are 3/8" Cycle with a small hex.; otoh, if the nuts are 12-point (double hex.), they're most-likely UNF and the stud/crankcase thread is UNC. Small hex. nuts are a whole 'nother can of worms ... :rofl

I have found a supplier that will do all the fork and front end nuts, bolts and washers - literally every fastening between the top yoke and the wheel - against the part numbers off the parts diagram (for a T140 as that's where the forks came from).
(Forks are T150, remember) Bear in mind that, with the exception of the caliper mounting studs into the sliders and the drain plugs in the bottoms of the sliders, these are all UNF threads ... caliper mounting studs into the sliders are BSF, drain plugs in the bottoms of the sliders are 2BA. Btw, if fitting the new drain plugs feels at all stiff, don't carry on, the supplier has supplied 3/16"UNF or No.10UNF screws which are similar but not the same and they will break, damhikt ... :cry

I seem to recall one pair of pinch bolts on one of the yokes had metric Allen heads, just to add to the mix...
Mmmm ... you sure this wasn't just an odd Allen hex.? All the yoke pinch bolts are 3/8"UNF, the top yoke threads are in the yoke, the drive-side lower yoke pinch bolt is also the eyebolt for mounting a front brake pipe-hose junction. Otoh, I have encountered Allen hexs. that differ by only 1/32", which could've meant you found a metric Allen key fitted better?

I have access to an ultrasonic cleaning bath this weekend, so plan to chuck a few of the bolts in there and see how they come up. I'm not worried necessarily about shiny,
as long as they look clean, and I can get the surface corrosion off. It's a cheap (free) and easy thing to try, anyway, and it may allow some of them to be re-used satisfactorily.
Mmmm ... again risking stating the obvious, while ultrasonic might clean off corrosion, rust's because the plating's damaged/gone, so they'll rust again unless you replate 'em. If you're planning on having a commercial plater replate 'em, because of the process, you cleaning off corrosion is unlikely to save you much money. Cleaning 'em yourself only might be worthwhile if you're also replating yourself.

not worried necessarily about shiny, (apart from perhaps the stem nut and the fork top nuts due to their prominent position),
Stainless for these?

Btw, one place I found stainless domed nuts to be better than the standard self-locking nuts was on the lower yoke stanchion pinch bolts. The nuts are on the front of the yoke and even though my T160's had only been on the road for about six years when I changed 'em, I remember finding significant corrosion here, presumably because water and road crap had been driven between the nut and bolt threads by speed. :(

Hth.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I got my first set of bolts through the post today from Namrick who seem to carry an excellent selection of bright zinc plated high tensile UNF nuts and bolts of the various sizes needed. Excellent service, in that I ordered late Tuesday, and they came through the door midday today (Thursday). Bolts look to be good quality and nicely finished, and carry the important 3 radial lines on the heads (Grade 5).

As per advice, I cross referenced the part numbers of the bolts needed (in this case rear subframe to frame) from a 1968 650 twin parts list using Google, noted the measurements, then started hunting through suppliers. Ordered the necessary bolts for the frame to rear frame fixings, plus a couple of bags of washers and nuts, and it came to a reasonable £22 delivered. I didn't even need to dig through my bags to find the originals, which saved a little bit of time.

Once these new fasteners are fitted, and I'm happy with everything, the old ones will go into a 'discard or spares' tub out of the way.

For peace of mind, I test-fitted the rear pair of lower bolts with the captive threads in the frame, and they screw in nicely. Even knowing I ordered the right parts, it's a relief confirming it's all going to go back together nicely.

Also, couldn't resist a sad photo of a shiny new bolt and washer loosely fitted to my newly painted subframe. I need little snippets like this to provide the occasional glimpse of what it is that I'm going to end up with :)

I'm going to keep ordering the replacement bolts via the same method as I go through. Very impressed with Namrick based on this first experience though.

Thank you all for the words of wisdom. Greatly appreciated.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,743 Posts
I got my first set of bolts through the post today from Namrick who seem to carry an excellent selection of bright zinc plated high tensile UNF nuts and bolts of the various sizes needed. Excellent service, in that I ordered late Tuesday, and they came through the door midday today (Thursday). Bolts look to be good quality and nicely finished, and carry the important 3 radial lines on the heads (Grade 5).
Hi Postie.

Good read.

I considered zinc plate over stainless for my rebuild but was swayed to the latter due to the corrosion free properties of stainless.

Pitting can occur with stainless, but this would require severe environments which might include the presence of corrosive chemicals such as chloride.

The problem with zinc plating is that corrosion will take place once the zinc coating is damaged.
Such damage can easily take place simply by the pressures brought upon the respective surfaces of fasteners when tightening takes place.

On the other hand, zinc plating is ideal for those who require fully original restorations in which original fasteners are valued in a rebuild.

Cheers

R R
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top